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Rapid partial repigmentation of vitiligo in a young female adult with a gluten-free diet.

Khandalavala BN, Nirmalraj MC - Case Rep Dermatol (2014)

Bottom Line: The majority of the benefits occurred within the first month and stabilized at 4 months.Previous topical and phototherapy had not been found to be effective.The patient was maintained on the previously prescribed dapsone therapy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Family Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebr., USA.

ABSTRACT
Vitiligo is a common pigmentary skin condition with a profound impact. Despite a number of therapeutic modalities, few have been demonstrated to result in significant repigmentation within a brief period of time. Reported dietary interventions are sparse. Following exclusion of gluten in the diet, early and extensive repigmentation of facial lesions were noted in a young female adult of Asian ethnicity with acrofacial vitiligo. The majority of the benefits occurred within the first month and stabilized at 4 months. Previous topical and phototherapy had not been found to be effective. The patient was maintained on the previously prescribed dapsone therapy. Dietary elimination can potentially be a disease-modifying intervention for vitiligo and should be considered even in patients without concomitant celiac disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

August 12, 2013.
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Figure 2: August 12, 2013.

Mentions: Topical therapy had been initiated within the first year with tacrolimus ointment, and subsequently calcipotriene, with no response, following a diagnosis of vitiligo by a local dermatologist. Topical steroids had been equally ineffective. Dapsone had been initiated at 100 mg three times a week with simultaneous phototherapy, after consulting a dermatologist with extensive expertise in vitiligo in India. The light therapy had been discontinued due to inconvenience and lack of response. Based on anecdotal improvement of vitiligo with elimination of gluten from other patients and the lack of any significant impact of conventional therapies, we advised her to try complete elimination of gluten from her regular diet to determine whether this would result in any potential changes. She was maintained on oral dapsone. Within 1 month, profound and significant repigmentation was evident (fig. 2). Of note, the areas of repigmentation were distinctly darker than the native skin, which normalized over the subsequent month. Improvement continued for the next 3 months and maximal improvement was seen by 3 months, with no further repigmentation (fig. 3). None of the other lesions showed similar changes or progress of the disease. The elimination diet was well tolerated, though restrictive, and compliance was not difficult to maintain once benefits were evident. Long-term follow-up is planned.


Rapid partial repigmentation of vitiligo in a young female adult with a gluten-free diet.

Khandalavala BN, Nirmalraj MC - Case Rep Dermatol (2014)

August 12, 2013.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4307007&req=5

Figure 2: August 12, 2013.
Mentions: Topical therapy had been initiated within the first year with tacrolimus ointment, and subsequently calcipotriene, with no response, following a diagnosis of vitiligo by a local dermatologist. Topical steroids had been equally ineffective. Dapsone had been initiated at 100 mg three times a week with simultaneous phototherapy, after consulting a dermatologist with extensive expertise in vitiligo in India. The light therapy had been discontinued due to inconvenience and lack of response. Based on anecdotal improvement of vitiligo with elimination of gluten from other patients and the lack of any significant impact of conventional therapies, we advised her to try complete elimination of gluten from her regular diet to determine whether this would result in any potential changes. She was maintained on oral dapsone. Within 1 month, profound and significant repigmentation was evident (fig. 2). Of note, the areas of repigmentation were distinctly darker than the native skin, which normalized over the subsequent month. Improvement continued for the next 3 months and maximal improvement was seen by 3 months, with no further repigmentation (fig. 3). None of the other lesions showed similar changes or progress of the disease. The elimination diet was well tolerated, though restrictive, and compliance was not difficult to maintain once benefits were evident. Long-term follow-up is planned.

Bottom Line: The majority of the benefits occurred within the first month and stabilized at 4 months.Previous topical and phototherapy had not been found to be effective.The patient was maintained on the previously prescribed dapsone therapy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Family Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebr., USA.

ABSTRACT
Vitiligo is a common pigmentary skin condition with a profound impact. Despite a number of therapeutic modalities, few have been demonstrated to result in significant repigmentation within a brief period of time. Reported dietary interventions are sparse. Following exclusion of gluten in the diet, early and extensive repigmentation of facial lesions were noted in a young female adult of Asian ethnicity with acrofacial vitiligo. The majority of the benefits occurred within the first month and stabilized at 4 months. Previous topical and phototherapy had not been found to be effective. The patient was maintained on the previously prescribed dapsone therapy. Dietary elimination can potentially be a disease-modifying intervention for vitiligo and should be considered even in patients without concomitant celiac disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus