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Royal Jelly alleviates sperm toxicity and improves in vitro fertilization outcome in Stanozolol-treated mice.

Shalizar Jalali A, Najafi G, Hosseinchi M, Sedighnia A - Iran J Reprod Med (2015)

Bottom Line: ST treatment caused a significant (p<0.05) decrease in sperm count and motility and fertilization rate along with poor blastocyst formation and increased sperm DNA damage.The above-mentioned parameters were restored to near normal level by RJ co-administration.However, clinical studies are warranted to investigate such an effect in human subjects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Basic Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Urmia University, Urmia, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: Stanozolol (ST) is a synthetic anabolic-androgenic steroid often abused by athletes. An increasing body of evidence points towards the role of ST misuses in the pathogenesis of a wide range of adverse effects including reprotoxicity.

Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the possible reproprotective effect of royal jelly (RJ) as an efficient antioxidant in ST-treated mice.

Materials and methods: Adult male mice were divided into four groups (n=5). Two groups of mice received ST (4.6 mg/kg/day) via gavage for 35 days. RJ was given orally to one of these groups at the dose level of 100 mg/kg body weight per day synchronously. Untreated control group and RJ-only treated group were also included. Epididymal sperm characteristics and in vitro fertilizing capacity were evaluated after 35 days.

Results: ST treatment caused a significant (p<0.05) decrease in sperm count and motility and fertilization rate along with poor blastocyst formation and increased sperm DNA damage. Moreover, the incidence of apoptosis and abnormality in spermatozoa was significantly (p<0.05) higher in ST-exposed mice than those of control. The above-mentioned parameters were restored to near normal level by RJ co-administration.

Conclusion: Data from the current study suggest that RJ has a potential repro-protective action against ST-induced reproductive toxicity in mice. However, clinical studies are warranted to investigate such an effect in human subjects.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of stanozolol and royal jelly treatment on the rate of blastulation.
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Figure 3: Effect of stanozolol and royal jelly treatment on the rate of blastulation.

Mentions: Figure 2 compares ISR among the four experimental groups. The proportion of fertilized oocytes to inseminated oocytes was significantly lower in ST-only treated mice than in the control group. Co-treatment with RJ resulted in a significant improvement in this parameter compared to the ST alone group. The effects of different treatments on BD are depicted in Figure 3. The proportion of embryos that became blastocysts in ST alone group was significantly lower than that in the control group. Mice treated with RJ simultaneously exhibited amelioration of ST-induced embryo toxicity. Figure 4 summarizes the effects of ST and RJ on HR. The rate of completely hatched blastocysts was significantly smaller in ST-received mice compared to that in the controls, while this ratio was nearly restored to control levels by RJ co-administration.


Royal Jelly alleviates sperm toxicity and improves in vitro fertilization outcome in Stanozolol-treated mice.

Shalizar Jalali A, Najafi G, Hosseinchi M, Sedighnia A - Iran J Reprod Med (2015)

Effect of stanozolol and royal jelly treatment on the rate of blastulation.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4306980&req=5

Figure 3: Effect of stanozolol and royal jelly treatment on the rate of blastulation.
Mentions: Figure 2 compares ISR among the four experimental groups. The proportion of fertilized oocytes to inseminated oocytes was significantly lower in ST-only treated mice than in the control group. Co-treatment with RJ resulted in a significant improvement in this parameter compared to the ST alone group. The effects of different treatments on BD are depicted in Figure 3. The proportion of embryos that became blastocysts in ST alone group was significantly lower than that in the control group. Mice treated with RJ simultaneously exhibited amelioration of ST-induced embryo toxicity. Figure 4 summarizes the effects of ST and RJ on HR. The rate of completely hatched blastocysts was significantly smaller in ST-received mice compared to that in the controls, while this ratio was nearly restored to control levels by RJ co-administration.

Bottom Line: ST treatment caused a significant (p<0.05) decrease in sperm count and motility and fertilization rate along with poor blastocyst formation and increased sperm DNA damage.The above-mentioned parameters were restored to near normal level by RJ co-administration.However, clinical studies are warranted to investigate such an effect in human subjects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Basic Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Urmia University, Urmia, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: Stanozolol (ST) is a synthetic anabolic-androgenic steroid often abused by athletes. An increasing body of evidence points towards the role of ST misuses in the pathogenesis of a wide range of adverse effects including reprotoxicity.

Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the possible reproprotective effect of royal jelly (RJ) as an efficient antioxidant in ST-treated mice.

Materials and methods: Adult male mice were divided into four groups (n=5). Two groups of mice received ST (4.6 mg/kg/day) via gavage for 35 days. RJ was given orally to one of these groups at the dose level of 100 mg/kg body weight per day synchronously. Untreated control group and RJ-only treated group were also included. Epididymal sperm characteristics and in vitro fertilizing capacity were evaluated after 35 days.

Results: ST treatment caused a significant (p<0.05) decrease in sperm count and motility and fertilization rate along with poor blastocyst formation and increased sperm DNA damage. Moreover, the incidence of apoptosis and abnormality in spermatozoa was significantly (p<0.05) higher in ST-exposed mice than those of control. The above-mentioned parameters were restored to near normal level by RJ co-administration.

Conclusion: Data from the current study suggest that RJ has a potential repro-protective action against ST-induced reproductive toxicity in mice. However, clinical studies are warranted to investigate such an effect in human subjects.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus