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Marine peptides and their anti-infective activities.

Kang HK, Seo CH, Park Y - Mar Drugs (2015)

Bottom Line: Moreover, several studies have reported that marine peptides exhibit various anti-infective activities, such as antimicrobial, antifungal, antimalarial, antiprotozoal, anti-tuberculosis, and antiviral activities.In the last several decades, studies of marine plants, animals, and microbes have revealed tremendous number of structurally diverse and bioactive secondary metabolites.Thus, the identification of novel antimicrobial peptides should be continued, and all possible strategies should be explored.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Science, Chosun University, Gwangju 501-759, Korea. hkkang129@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Marine bioresources are a valuable source of bioactive compounds with industrial and nutraceutical potential. Numerous clinical trials evaluating novel chemotherapeutic agents derived from marine sources have revealed novel mechanisms of action. Recently, marine-derived bioactive peptides have attracted attention owing to their numerous beneficial effects. Moreover, several studies have reported that marine peptides exhibit various anti-infective activities, such as antimicrobial, antifungal, antimalarial, antiprotozoal, anti-tuberculosis, and antiviral activities. In the last several decades, studies of marine plants, animals, and microbes have revealed tremendous number of structurally diverse and bioactive secondary metabolites. However, the treatments available for many infectious diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, and viruses are limited. Thus, the identification of novel antimicrobial peptides should be continued, and all possible strategies should be explored. In this review, we will present the structures and anti-infective activity of peptides isolated from marine sources (sponges, algae, bacteria, fungi and fish) from 2006 to the present.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Structure of Homophymines A–E (99–103) and A1–E1 (104–108). Homophymines are a series of cyclodepsipeptides isolated from Homophymia sp. collected from shallow waters off the east coast of New Caledonia [87,88].
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marinedrugs-13-00618-f016: Structure of Homophymines A–E (99–103) and A1–E1 (104–108). Homophymines are a series of cyclodepsipeptides isolated from Homophymia sp. collected from shallow waters off the east coast of New Caledonia [87,88].

Mentions: The cytotoxic cyclic peptide lactone, koshikamide B (109), is the first account of a peptide possessing a carbamoylated asparagine and the new amino acid residue 2-(3-amino-2-hydroxy-5-oxopyrrolidin-2-yl) propionic acid (AHPP) [89]. It was initially isolated from a Theonella sp., collected off Shimokoshiki Island, Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan. It exhibited cytotoxicity against P388 murine leukemia and HCT-116 human colon tumor cell lines, with IC50 values of 0.22 and 3.7 μM, respectively (Figure 16). Koshikamides F–H (110–112) are 17-residue depsipeptides containing a 10-residue macrolactone that inhibits HIV-1 entry against a CCR5-using viral envelope, with IC50 values of 2.3 and 5.5 μM, respectively, whereas their linear kishikamides C were inactive [90]. Koshikamides F–H also had moderate cytotoxicity in the HCT-116 colon cancer cell line with an IC50 of 10 μM. Koshikamides F-H did not inhibit the growth of C. albicans.


Marine peptides and their anti-infective activities.

Kang HK, Seo CH, Park Y - Mar Drugs (2015)

Structure of Homophymines A–E (99–103) and A1–E1 (104–108). Homophymines are a series of cyclodepsipeptides isolated from Homophymia sp. collected from shallow waters off the east coast of New Caledonia [87,88].
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4306955&req=5

marinedrugs-13-00618-f016: Structure of Homophymines A–E (99–103) and A1–E1 (104–108). Homophymines are a series of cyclodepsipeptides isolated from Homophymia sp. collected from shallow waters off the east coast of New Caledonia [87,88].
Mentions: The cytotoxic cyclic peptide lactone, koshikamide B (109), is the first account of a peptide possessing a carbamoylated asparagine and the new amino acid residue 2-(3-amino-2-hydroxy-5-oxopyrrolidin-2-yl) propionic acid (AHPP) [89]. It was initially isolated from a Theonella sp., collected off Shimokoshiki Island, Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan. It exhibited cytotoxicity against P388 murine leukemia and HCT-116 human colon tumor cell lines, with IC50 values of 0.22 and 3.7 μM, respectively (Figure 16). Koshikamides F–H (110–112) are 17-residue depsipeptides containing a 10-residue macrolactone that inhibits HIV-1 entry against a CCR5-using viral envelope, with IC50 values of 2.3 and 5.5 μM, respectively, whereas their linear kishikamides C were inactive [90]. Koshikamides F–H also had moderate cytotoxicity in the HCT-116 colon cancer cell line with an IC50 of 10 μM. Koshikamides F-H did not inhibit the growth of C. albicans.

Bottom Line: Moreover, several studies have reported that marine peptides exhibit various anti-infective activities, such as antimicrobial, antifungal, antimalarial, antiprotozoal, anti-tuberculosis, and antiviral activities.In the last several decades, studies of marine plants, animals, and microbes have revealed tremendous number of structurally diverse and bioactive secondary metabolites.Thus, the identification of novel antimicrobial peptides should be continued, and all possible strategies should be explored.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Science, Chosun University, Gwangju 501-759, Korea. hkkang129@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Marine bioresources are a valuable source of bioactive compounds with industrial and nutraceutical potential. Numerous clinical trials evaluating novel chemotherapeutic agents derived from marine sources have revealed novel mechanisms of action. Recently, marine-derived bioactive peptides have attracted attention owing to their numerous beneficial effects. Moreover, several studies have reported that marine peptides exhibit various anti-infective activities, such as antimicrobial, antifungal, antimalarial, antiprotozoal, anti-tuberculosis, and antiviral activities. In the last several decades, studies of marine plants, animals, and microbes have revealed tremendous number of structurally diverse and bioactive secondary metabolites. However, the treatments available for many infectious diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, and viruses are limited. Thus, the identification of novel antimicrobial peptides should be continued, and all possible strategies should be explored. In this review, we will present the structures and anti-infective activity of peptides isolated from marine sources (sponges, algae, bacteria, fungi and fish) from 2006 to the present.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus