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Marine peptides and their anti-infective activities.

Kang HK, Seo CH, Park Y - Mar Drugs (2015)

Bottom Line: Moreover, several studies have reported that marine peptides exhibit various anti-infective activities, such as antimicrobial, antifungal, antimalarial, antiprotozoal, anti-tuberculosis, and antiviral activities.In the last several decades, studies of marine plants, animals, and microbes have revealed tremendous number of structurally diverse and bioactive secondary metabolites.Thus, the identification of novel antimicrobial peptides should be continued, and all possible strategies should be explored.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Science, Chosun University, Gwangju 501-759, Korea. hkkang129@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Marine bioresources are a valuable source of bioactive compounds with industrial and nutraceutical potential. Numerous clinical trials evaluating novel chemotherapeutic agents derived from marine sources have revealed novel mechanisms of action. Recently, marine-derived bioactive peptides have attracted attention owing to their numerous beneficial effects. Moreover, several studies have reported that marine peptides exhibit various anti-infective activities, such as antimicrobial, antifungal, antimalarial, antiprotozoal, anti-tuberculosis, and antiviral activities. In the last several decades, studies of marine plants, animals, and microbes have revealed tremendous number of structurally diverse and bioactive secondary metabolites. However, the treatments available for many infectious diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, and viruses are limited. Thus, the identification of novel antimicrobial peptides should be continued, and all possible strategies should be explored. In this review, we will present the structures and anti-infective activity of peptides isolated from marine sources (sponges, algae, bacteria, fungi and fish) from 2006 to the present.

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Structure of Anthracimycin (35). Anthracimycin were isolated from the Steptomyces bacteria [55].
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marinedrugs-13-00618-f011: Structure of Anthracimycin (35). Anthracimycin were isolated from the Steptomyces bacteria [55].

Mentions: Anthracimycin (35), a chemical compound derived from the Steptomyces bacteria, was discovered in the ocean off the coast of Santa Barbara in California [55]. It has shown significant activity against B. anthracis, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus pneumo nia and S. aureus including MSSA, MRSA and vancomycin-resistant strains of S. aureus at MIC value between 0.03125 and 0.25 μg/mL. At concentrations near the MIC, anthracimycin inhibited S. aureus nucleic acid synthesis as determined by optimized macromolecular synthesis methodology, with inhibition of DNA and RNA synthesis occurring in the absence of DNA intercalation. Anthracimycin at a single dose of 1 or 10 mg/kg was able to protect mice from MRSA-induced mortality in a murine peritonitis model of infection. Anthracimycin provides an interesting new scaffold for future development of a novel MRSA antibiotic [55] (Figure 11).


Marine peptides and their anti-infective activities.

Kang HK, Seo CH, Park Y - Mar Drugs (2015)

Structure of Anthracimycin (35). Anthracimycin were isolated from the Steptomyces bacteria [55].
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4306955&req=5

marinedrugs-13-00618-f011: Structure of Anthracimycin (35). Anthracimycin were isolated from the Steptomyces bacteria [55].
Mentions: Anthracimycin (35), a chemical compound derived from the Steptomyces bacteria, was discovered in the ocean off the coast of Santa Barbara in California [55]. It has shown significant activity against B. anthracis, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus pneumo nia and S. aureus including MSSA, MRSA and vancomycin-resistant strains of S. aureus at MIC value between 0.03125 and 0.25 μg/mL. At concentrations near the MIC, anthracimycin inhibited S. aureus nucleic acid synthesis as determined by optimized macromolecular synthesis methodology, with inhibition of DNA and RNA synthesis occurring in the absence of DNA intercalation. Anthracimycin at a single dose of 1 or 10 mg/kg was able to protect mice from MRSA-induced mortality in a murine peritonitis model of infection. Anthracimycin provides an interesting new scaffold for future development of a novel MRSA antibiotic [55] (Figure 11).

Bottom Line: Moreover, several studies have reported that marine peptides exhibit various anti-infective activities, such as antimicrobial, antifungal, antimalarial, antiprotozoal, anti-tuberculosis, and antiviral activities.In the last several decades, studies of marine plants, animals, and microbes have revealed tremendous number of structurally diverse and bioactive secondary metabolites.Thus, the identification of novel antimicrobial peptides should be continued, and all possible strategies should be explored.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Science, Chosun University, Gwangju 501-759, Korea. hkkang129@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Marine bioresources are a valuable source of bioactive compounds with industrial and nutraceutical potential. Numerous clinical trials evaluating novel chemotherapeutic agents derived from marine sources have revealed novel mechanisms of action. Recently, marine-derived bioactive peptides have attracted attention owing to their numerous beneficial effects. Moreover, several studies have reported that marine peptides exhibit various anti-infective activities, such as antimicrobial, antifungal, antimalarial, antiprotozoal, anti-tuberculosis, and antiviral activities. In the last several decades, studies of marine plants, animals, and microbes have revealed tremendous number of structurally diverse and bioactive secondary metabolites. However, the treatments available for many infectious diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, and viruses are limited. Thus, the identification of novel antimicrobial peptides should be continued, and all possible strategies should be explored. In this review, we will present the structures and anti-infective activity of peptides isolated from marine sources (sponges, algae, bacteria, fungi and fish) from 2006 to the present.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus