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Marine peptides and their anti-infective activities.

Kang HK, Seo CH, Park Y - Mar Drugs (2015)

Bottom Line: Moreover, several studies have reported that marine peptides exhibit various anti-infective activities, such as antimicrobial, antifungal, antimalarial, antiprotozoal, anti-tuberculosis, and antiviral activities.In the last several decades, studies of marine plants, animals, and microbes have revealed tremendous number of structurally diverse and bioactive secondary metabolites.Thus, the identification of novel antimicrobial peptides should be continued, and all possible strategies should be explored.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Science, Chosun University, Gwangju 501-759, Korea. hkkang129@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Marine bioresources are a valuable source of bioactive compounds with industrial and nutraceutical potential. Numerous clinical trials evaluating novel chemotherapeutic agents derived from marine sources have revealed novel mechanisms of action. Recently, marine-derived bioactive peptides have attracted attention owing to their numerous beneficial effects. Moreover, several studies have reported that marine peptides exhibit various anti-infective activities, such as antimicrobial, antifungal, antimalarial, antiprotozoal, anti-tuberculosis, and antiviral activities. In the last several decades, studies of marine plants, animals, and microbes have revealed tremendous number of structurally diverse and bioactive secondary metabolites. However, the treatments available for many infectious diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, and viruses are limited. Thus, the identification of novel antimicrobial peptides should be continued, and all possible strategies should be explored. In this review, we will present the structures and anti-infective activity of peptides isolated from marine sources (sponges, algae, bacteria, fungi and fish) from 2006 to the present.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Amino acid sequence of scygonadin (5). Scygonadin was isolated from the seminal plasma of the mud crab, Scylla serrate [36,37]. Scygonadin contained α-helices and had 39 residues on the same hydrophobic surface. Scygonadin may interact with cell membranes.
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marinedrugs-13-00618-f004: Amino acid sequence of scygonadin (5). Scygonadin was isolated from the seminal plasma of the mud crab, Scylla serrate [36,37]. Scygonadin contained α-helices and had 39 residues on the same hydrophobic surface. Scygonadin may interact with cell membranes.

Mentions: Scygonadin (5) is an anionic antimicrobial peptide recently identified from the seminal plasma of Scylla serrata. [36,37]. This molecule (Figure 4), which showed no homology to any other protein in databanks, was able to inhibit Micrococcus luteus growth [93]. Scygonadin showed activity against E. coli (MIC = 25–50 μg/mL), P. aeruginosa (MIC = 12.5–25 μg/mL), S. aureus (MIC = 50–100 μg/mL) and Streptococcus pyogenes (MIC = 25–50 μg/mL). To gain more detailed information about its antimicrobial activity, the mature scygonadin peptide was expressed in E. coli to obtain a large quantity of the biologically active product. An approximately 43-kDa fusion protein, CKS-scygonadin, was obtained, and was highly stable and active [37].


Marine peptides and their anti-infective activities.

Kang HK, Seo CH, Park Y - Mar Drugs (2015)

Amino acid sequence of scygonadin (5). Scygonadin was isolated from the seminal plasma of the mud crab, Scylla serrate [36,37]. Scygonadin contained α-helices and had 39 residues on the same hydrophobic surface. Scygonadin may interact with cell membranes.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4306955&req=5

marinedrugs-13-00618-f004: Amino acid sequence of scygonadin (5). Scygonadin was isolated from the seminal plasma of the mud crab, Scylla serrate [36,37]. Scygonadin contained α-helices and had 39 residues on the same hydrophobic surface. Scygonadin may interact with cell membranes.
Mentions: Scygonadin (5) is an anionic antimicrobial peptide recently identified from the seminal plasma of Scylla serrata. [36,37]. This molecule (Figure 4), which showed no homology to any other protein in databanks, was able to inhibit Micrococcus luteus growth [93]. Scygonadin showed activity against E. coli (MIC = 25–50 μg/mL), P. aeruginosa (MIC = 12.5–25 μg/mL), S. aureus (MIC = 50–100 μg/mL) and Streptococcus pyogenes (MIC = 25–50 μg/mL). To gain more detailed information about its antimicrobial activity, the mature scygonadin peptide was expressed in E. coli to obtain a large quantity of the biologically active product. An approximately 43-kDa fusion protein, CKS-scygonadin, was obtained, and was highly stable and active [37].

Bottom Line: Moreover, several studies have reported that marine peptides exhibit various anti-infective activities, such as antimicrobial, antifungal, antimalarial, antiprotozoal, anti-tuberculosis, and antiviral activities.In the last several decades, studies of marine plants, animals, and microbes have revealed tremendous number of structurally diverse and bioactive secondary metabolites.Thus, the identification of novel antimicrobial peptides should be continued, and all possible strategies should be explored.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Science, Chosun University, Gwangju 501-759, Korea. hkkang129@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Marine bioresources are a valuable source of bioactive compounds with industrial and nutraceutical potential. Numerous clinical trials evaluating novel chemotherapeutic agents derived from marine sources have revealed novel mechanisms of action. Recently, marine-derived bioactive peptides have attracted attention owing to their numerous beneficial effects. Moreover, several studies have reported that marine peptides exhibit various anti-infective activities, such as antimicrobial, antifungal, antimalarial, antiprotozoal, anti-tuberculosis, and antiviral activities. In the last several decades, studies of marine plants, animals, and microbes have revealed tremendous number of structurally diverse and bioactive secondary metabolites. However, the treatments available for many infectious diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, and viruses are limited. Thus, the identification of novel antimicrobial peptides should be continued, and all possible strategies should be explored. In this review, we will present the structures and anti-infective activity of peptides isolated from marine sources (sponges, algae, bacteria, fungi and fish) from 2006 to the present.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus