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Public health adaptation to climate change in Canadian jurisdictions.

Austin SE, Ford JD, Berrang-Ford L, Araos M, Parker S, Fleury MD - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Based on publically available information, reported adaptation also varies greatly by municipality.The six sampled Canadian regional health authorities (or equivalent) are not reporting any adaptation initiatives.We also find little relationship between the number of initiatives reported in the six sampled municipalities and their provinces, suggesting that municipalities are adapting (or not adapting) autonomously.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Geography, McGill University, Burnside Hall Building Room 705, 805 Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal, QC H3A 0B9, Canada. stephanie.austin@mail.mcgill.ca.

ABSTRACT
Climate change poses numerous risks to the health of Canadians. Extreme weather events, poor air quality, and food insecurity in northern regions are likely to increase along with the increasing incidence and range of infectious diseases. In this study we identify and characterize Canadian federal, provincial, territorial and municipal adaptation to these health risks based on publically available information. Federal health adaptation initiatives emphasize capacity building and gathering information to address general health, infectious disease and heat-related risks. Provincial and territorial adaptation is varied. Quebec is a leader in climate change adaptation, having a notably higher number of adaptation initiatives reported, addressing almost all risks posed by climate change in the province, and having implemented various adaptation types. Meanwhile, all other Canadian provinces and territories are in the early stages of health adaptation. Based on publically available information, reported adaptation also varies greatly by municipality. The six sampled Canadian regional health authorities (or equivalent) are not reporting any adaptation initiatives. We also find little relationship between the number of initiatives reported in the six sampled municipalities and their provinces, suggesting that municipalities are adapting (or not adapting) autonomously.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Percentage of federal health adaptation initiatives by health risk.
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ijerph-12-00623-f003: Percentage of federal health adaptation initiatives by health risk.

Mentions: Canadian federal health adaptation initiatives emphasize capacity building and information type initiatives, addressing infectious diseases, heat-related risks or general health risks (Figure 2 and Figure 3). Contributing to the large number of capacity building initiatives is a series of heat risk guidelines and guidebooks prepared by Health Canada for public health officials, emergency management officials, health care workers and health administrators [66,67,68]. Meanwhile, most information initiatives reflect research conducted by the Public Health Agency of Canada that focuses on food and water safety and vector-borne diseases [69]. Both Health Canada and Natural Resources Canada have completed national vulnerability assessments (see Appendix D in Supplementary Material for descriptions of federal departments) [14,22,23]. Some of these health adaptation initiatives were implemented as part of the multi-departmental Adaptation Theme of the federal government’s Clean Air Agenda. Canada’s Federal Adaptation Policy Framework does not discuss any specific adaptation initiatives. The continuation and further expansion of health adaptation programs and funding availability depend on the priorities of individual departments and upper-level government. A list of all federal, provincial, territorial and municipal adaptation initiatives by type is shown in Table 2, and an Excel spreadsheet detailing all discrete adaptation initiatives is available in in the Supplementary Material (Appendix E).


Public health adaptation to climate change in Canadian jurisdictions.

Austin SE, Ford JD, Berrang-Ford L, Araos M, Parker S, Fleury MD - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Percentage of federal health adaptation initiatives by health risk.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4306883&req=5

ijerph-12-00623-f003: Percentage of federal health adaptation initiatives by health risk.
Mentions: Canadian federal health adaptation initiatives emphasize capacity building and information type initiatives, addressing infectious diseases, heat-related risks or general health risks (Figure 2 and Figure 3). Contributing to the large number of capacity building initiatives is a series of heat risk guidelines and guidebooks prepared by Health Canada for public health officials, emergency management officials, health care workers and health administrators [66,67,68]. Meanwhile, most information initiatives reflect research conducted by the Public Health Agency of Canada that focuses on food and water safety and vector-borne diseases [69]. Both Health Canada and Natural Resources Canada have completed national vulnerability assessments (see Appendix D in Supplementary Material for descriptions of federal departments) [14,22,23]. Some of these health adaptation initiatives were implemented as part of the multi-departmental Adaptation Theme of the federal government’s Clean Air Agenda. Canada’s Federal Adaptation Policy Framework does not discuss any specific adaptation initiatives. The continuation and further expansion of health adaptation programs and funding availability depend on the priorities of individual departments and upper-level government. A list of all federal, provincial, territorial and municipal adaptation initiatives by type is shown in Table 2, and an Excel spreadsheet detailing all discrete adaptation initiatives is available in in the Supplementary Material (Appendix E).

Bottom Line: Based on publically available information, reported adaptation also varies greatly by municipality.The six sampled Canadian regional health authorities (or equivalent) are not reporting any adaptation initiatives.We also find little relationship between the number of initiatives reported in the six sampled municipalities and their provinces, suggesting that municipalities are adapting (or not adapting) autonomously.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Geography, McGill University, Burnside Hall Building Room 705, 805 Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal, QC H3A 0B9, Canada. stephanie.austin@mail.mcgill.ca.

ABSTRACT
Climate change poses numerous risks to the health of Canadians. Extreme weather events, poor air quality, and food insecurity in northern regions are likely to increase along with the increasing incidence and range of infectious diseases. In this study we identify and characterize Canadian federal, provincial, territorial and municipal adaptation to these health risks based on publically available information. Federal health adaptation initiatives emphasize capacity building and gathering information to address general health, infectious disease and heat-related risks. Provincial and territorial adaptation is varied. Quebec is a leader in climate change adaptation, having a notably higher number of adaptation initiatives reported, addressing almost all risks posed by climate change in the province, and having implemented various adaptation types. Meanwhile, all other Canadian provinces and territories are in the early stages of health adaptation. Based on publically available information, reported adaptation also varies greatly by municipality. The six sampled Canadian regional health authorities (or equivalent) are not reporting any adaptation initiatives. We also find little relationship between the number of initiatives reported in the six sampled municipalities and their provinces, suggesting that municipalities are adapting (or not adapting) autonomously.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus