Limits...
A systematic review and meta-analysis of dengue risk with temperature change.

Fan J, Wei W, Bai Z, Fan C, Li S, Liu Q, Yang K - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2014)

Bottom Line: Dengue fever (DF) is the most serious mosquito-borne viral disease in the world and is significantly affected by temperature.Although associations between DF and temperatures have been reported repeatedly, conclusions have been inconsistent.The OR of DF incidence increased steeply from 22 °C to 29 °C, suggesting an inflexion of DF risk between these lower and upper limits of DF risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: First Clinical Medical College, Lanzhou University, No. 1 Donggang West Road, Chengguan District, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000, China. baizhenggang@126.com.

ABSTRACT
Dengue fever (DF) is the most serious mosquito-borne viral disease in the world and is significantly affected by temperature. Although associations between DF and temperatures have been reported repeatedly, conclusions have been inconsistent. Six databases were searched up to 23 March 2014, without language and geographical restrictions. The articles that studied the correlations between temperatures and dengue were selected, and a random-effects model was used to calculate the pooled odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals. Of 1589 identified articles, 137 were reviewed further, with 33 satisfying inclusion criteria. The closest associations were observed between mean temperature from the included studies (23.2-27.7 °C) and DF (OR 35.0% per 1 °C; 95% CI 18.3%-51.6%) positively. Additionally, minimum (18.1-24.2 °C) (29.5% per 1 °C; 20.9%-38.1%) and maximum temperature (28.0-34.5 °C) (28.9%; 10.3%-47.5%) were also associated with increased dengue transmission. The OR of DF incidence increased steeply from 22 °C to 29 °C, suggesting an inflexion of DF risk between these lower and upper limits of DF risk. This discovery is helpful for government decision-makers focused on preventing and controlling dengue in areas with temperatures within this range.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

The scatter plot between extracted temperatures and OR of DF.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4306847&req=5

ijerph-12-00001-f001: The scatter plot between extracted temperatures and OR of DF.

Mentions: Figure 1 shows that from approximately 16 °C to 22 °C, the impact of temperature on dengue risk remains at a lower level; from approximately 22 °C, the OR of dengue risk increases steeply up to 29 °C; and that dengue risk begins to decrease if temperatures are higher than 29 °C.


A systematic review and meta-analysis of dengue risk with temperature change.

Fan J, Wei W, Bai Z, Fan C, Li S, Liu Q, Yang K - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2014)

The scatter plot between extracted temperatures and OR of DF.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4306847&req=5

ijerph-12-00001-f001: The scatter plot between extracted temperatures and OR of DF.
Mentions: Figure 1 shows that from approximately 16 °C to 22 °C, the impact of temperature on dengue risk remains at a lower level; from approximately 22 °C, the OR of dengue risk increases steeply up to 29 °C; and that dengue risk begins to decrease if temperatures are higher than 29 °C.

Bottom Line: Dengue fever (DF) is the most serious mosquito-borne viral disease in the world and is significantly affected by temperature.Although associations between DF and temperatures have been reported repeatedly, conclusions have been inconsistent.The OR of DF incidence increased steeply from 22 °C to 29 °C, suggesting an inflexion of DF risk between these lower and upper limits of DF risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: First Clinical Medical College, Lanzhou University, No. 1 Donggang West Road, Chengguan District, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000, China. baizhenggang@126.com.

ABSTRACT
Dengue fever (DF) is the most serious mosquito-borne viral disease in the world and is significantly affected by temperature. Although associations between DF and temperatures have been reported repeatedly, conclusions have been inconsistent. Six databases were searched up to 23 March 2014, without language and geographical restrictions. The articles that studied the correlations between temperatures and dengue were selected, and a random-effects model was used to calculate the pooled odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals. Of 1589 identified articles, 137 were reviewed further, with 33 satisfying inclusion criteria. The closest associations were observed between mean temperature from the included studies (23.2-27.7 °C) and DF (OR 35.0% per 1 °C; 95% CI 18.3%-51.6%) positively. Additionally, minimum (18.1-24.2 °C) (29.5% per 1 °C; 20.9%-38.1%) and maximum temperature (28.0-34.5 °C) (28.9%; 10.3%-47.5%) were also associated with increased dengue transmission. The OR of DF incidence increased steeply from 22 °C to 29 °C, suggesting an inflexion of DF risk between these lower and upper limits of DF risk. This discovery is helpful for government decision-makers focused on preventing and controlling dengue in areas with temperatures within this range.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus