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Poverty-related and neglected diseases - an economic and epidemiological analysis of poverty relatedness and neglect in research and development.

von Philipsborn P, Steinbeis F, Bender ME, Regmi S, Tinnemann P - Glob Health Action (2015)

Bottom Line: Within this group, the NF varies considerably (median: 19; IQR: 6-52).The IRF is an intuitive and meaningful metric to highlight shifts in global disease burden patterns.A large shortfall exists in global R&D spending for poverty-related and neglected diseases, with strong variations between diseases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Medicine, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany; Universities Allied for Essential Medicines Europe e.V. (UAEM), Berlin, Germany; peter.philipsborn@alumni.lse.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT

Background: Economic growth in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) has raised interest in how disease burden patterns are related to economic development. Meanwhile, poverty-related diseases are considered to be neglected in terms of research and development (R&D).

Objectives: Developing intuitive and meaningful metrics to measure how different diseases are related to poverty and neglected in the current R&D system.

Design: We measured how diseases are related to economic development with the income relation factor (IRF), defined by the ratio of disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) per 100,000 inhabitants in LMIC versus that in high-income countries. We calculated the IRF for 291 diseases and injuries and 67 risk factors included in the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010. We measured neglect in R&D with the neglect factor (NF), defined by the ratio of disease burden in DALYs (as percentage of the total global disease burden) and R&D expenditure (as percentage of total global health-related R&D expenditure) for 26 diseases.

Results: The disease burden varies considerably with the level of economic development, shown by the IRF (median: 1.38; interquartile range (IQR): 0.79-6.3). Comparison of IRFs from 1990 to 2010 highlights general patterns of the global epidemiological transition. The 26 poverty-related diseases included in our analysis of neglect in R&D are responsible for 13.8% of the global disease burden, but receive only 1.34% of global health-related R&D expenditure. Within this group, the NF varies considerably (median: 19; IQR: 6-52).

Conclusions: The IRF is an intuitive and meaningful metric to highlight shifts in global disease burden patterns. A large shortfall exists in global R&D spending for poverty-related and neglected diseases, with strong variations between diseases.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

PRND are strongly concentrated in only three world regions: Western and Eastern sub-Saharan Africa, and South Asia together account for more than 60% of the global burden of PRND, illustrating the concentration of PRND in the poorest countries. Source: Own calculations based on Global Burden of Disease Study 2010.
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Figure 0006: PRND are strongly concentrated in only three world regions: Western and Eastern sub-Saharan Africa, and South Asia together account for more than 60% of the global burden of PRND, illustrating the concentration of PRND in the poorest countries. Source: Own calculations based on Global Burden of Disease Study 2010.

Mentions: Of 2,490 million DALYs lost in 2010 to all causes of death and disability, 13.8% were caused by the 26 PRND included in our analysis (for details on each of these, see Fig. 2 and Table 4). From 2008 to 2012, on average 107 US$ per DALY was spent on health-related R&D annually. For the 26 PRND in our analysis, only 10.3 US$ per DALY was spent – 10 times less than the global average for all diseases. This is summed up by the NF of 10.3 for these 26 diseases combined, showing that the proportion of the global disease burden caused by these diseases is roughly 10 times larger than the proportion of total global health-related R&D expenditure spent on them. Figures 3 and 4 show detailed results for the 26 diseases and diseases groups. Figure 5 tracks the disease burden caused by these 26 diseases over the past 20 years, and Fig. 6 analyzes the geographical distribution of the disease burden caused by PRND.


Poverty-related and neglected diseases - an economic and epidemiological analysis of poverty relatedness and neglect in research and development.

von Philipsborn P, Steinbeis F, Bender ME, Regmi S, Tinnemann P - Glob Health Action (2015)

PRND are strongly concentrated in only three world regions: Western and Eastern sub-Saharan Africa, and South Asia together account for more than 60% of the global burden of PRND, illustrating the concentration of PRND in the poorest countries. Source: Own calculations based on Global Burden of Disease Study 2010.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4306754&req=5

Figure 0006: PRND are strongly concentrated in only three world regions: Western and Eastern sub-Saharan Africa, and South Asia together account for more than 60% of the global burden of PRND, illustrating the concentration of PRND in the poorest countries. Source: Own calculations based on Global Burden of Disease Study 2010.
Mentions: Of 2,490 million DALYs lost in 2010 to all causes of death and disability, 13.8% were caused by the 26 PRND included in our analysis (for details on each of these, see Fig. 2 and Table 4). From 2008 to 2012, on average 107 US$ per DALY was spent on health-related R&D annually. For the 26 PRND in our analysis, only 10.3 US$ per DALY was spent – 10 times less than the global average for all diseases. This is summed up by the NF of 10.3 for these 26 diseases combined, showing that the proportion of the global disease burden caused by these diseases is roughly 10 times larger than the proportion of total global health-related R&D expenditure spent on them. Figures 3 and 4 show detailed results for the 26 diseases and diseases groups. Figure 5 tracks the disease burden caused by these 26 diseases over the past 20 years, and Fig. 6 analyzes the geographical distribution of the disease burden caused by PRND.

Bottom Line: Within this group, the NF varies considerably (median: 19; IQR: 6-52).The IRF is an intuitive and meaningful metric to highlight shifts in global disease burden patterns.A large shortfall exists in global R&D spending for poverty-related and neglected diseases, with strong variations between diseases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Medicine, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany; Universities Allied for Essential Medicines Europe e.V. (UAEM), Berlin, Germany; peter.philipsborn@alumni.lse.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT

Background: Economic growth in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) has raised interest in how disease burden patterns are related to economic development. Meanwhile, poverty-related diseases are considered to be neglected in terms of research and development (R&D).

Objectives: Developing intuitive and meaningful metrics to measure how different diseases are related to poverty and neglected in the current R&D system.

Design: We measured how diseases are related to economic development with the income relation factor (IRF), defined by the ratio of disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) per 100,000 inhabitants in LMIC versus that in high-income countries. We calculated the IRF for 291 diseases and injuries and 67 risk factors included in the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010. We measured neglect in R&D with the neglect factor (NF), defined by the ratio of disease burden in DALYs (as percentage of the total global disease burden) and R&D expenditure (as percentage of total global health-related R&D expenditure) for 26 diseases.

Results: The disease burden varies considerably with the level of economic development, shown by the IRF (median: 1.38; interquartile range (IQR): 0.79-6.3). Comparison of IRFs from 1990 to 2010 highlights general patterns of the global epidemiological transition. The 26 poverty-related diseases included in our analysis of neglect in R&D are responsible for 13.8% of the global disease burden, but receive only 1.34% of global health-related R&D expenditure. Within this group, the NF varies considerably (median: 19; IQR: 6-52).

Conclusions: The IRF is an intuitive and meaningful metric to highlight shifts in global disease burden patterns. A large shortfall exists in global R&D spending for poverty-related and neglected diseases, with strong variations between diseases.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus