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Medication supply chain management through implementation of a hospital pharmacy computerized inventory program in Haiti.

Holm MR, Rudis MI, Wilson JW - Glob Health Action (2015)

Bottom Line: We hypothesized that the implementation of a new Pharmacy Computerized Inventory Program (PCIP) would optimize medication availability and decrease medication shortages.The pharmacy and nursing staff found the PCIP to be efficient and a significant improvement in their medication utilization.An efficient, customizable, and cost-sensitive PCIP can improve drug inventory management in a simplified and sustainable manner within a resource-constrained hospital.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pharmacy, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; holm.michelle@mayo.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: In the aftermath of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, St. Luke Hospital was built to help manage the mass casualties and subsequent cholera epidemic. A major problem faced by the hospital system was the lack of an available and sustainable supply of medications. Long-term viability of the hospital system depended largely on developing an uninterrupted medication supply chain.

Objective: We hypothesized that the implementation of a new Pharmacy Computerized Inventory Program (PCIP) would optimize medication availability and decrease medication shortages.

Design: We conducted the research by examining how medications were being utilized and distributed before and after the implementation of PCIP. We measured the number of documented medication transactions in both Phase 1 and Phase 2 as well as user logins to determine if a computerized inventory system would be beneficial in providing a sustainable, long-term solution to their medication management needs.

Results: The PCIP incorporated drug ordering, filling the drug requests, distribution, and dispensing of the medications in multiple settings; inventory of currently shelved medications; and graphic reporting of 'real-time' medication usage. During the PCIP initiation and establishment periods, the number of medication transactions increased from 219.6 to 359.5 (p=0.055), respectively, and the mean logins per day increased from 24.3 to 31.5, p<0.0001, respectively. The PCIP allows the hospital staff to identify and order medications with a critically low supply as well as track usage for future medication needs. The pharmacy and nursing staff found the PCIP to be efficient and a significant improvement in their medication utilization.

Conclusions: An efficient, customizable, and cost-sensitive PCIP can improve drug inventory management in a simplified and sustainable manner within a resource-constrained hospital.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Pharmacy computerized information system: central pharmacy medication inventory. Adding a new drug by the pharmacy staff when a shipment arrives involves searching for the drug by the first few letters or scrolling (similar to the nursing staff side) and then selecting the desired drug. After selecting the drug of choice, the pharmacy staff may change the quantity, expiration date, etc. If the drug is a new drug, then each field is filled in by the pharmacy staff.
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Figure 0003: Pharmacy computerized information system: central pharmacy medication inventory. Adding a new drug by the pharmacy staff when a shipment arrives involves searching for the drug by the first few letters or scrolling (similar to the nursing staff side) and then selecting the desired drug. After selecting the drug of choice, the pharmacy staff may change the quantity, expiration date, etc. If the drug is a new drug, then each field is filled in by the pharmacy staff.

Mentions: The PCIP was developed based on the completed needs assessment. The medication request and fill process is illustrated in Fig. 1.Figure 2–4illustrate screenshots as viewed by individuals using the PCIP system during the medication request and fill process. Figure 2 shows the screens for nurses and providers to enter online medication requests. Figure 3 depicts the screens used by central pharmacy to add a new medication to the inventory, and to maintain or adjust quantities of medications available. Figure 4 displays the off-line medication stock request cards designed for use in circumstances when the web-based PCIP program is unavailable.


Medication supply chain management through implementation of a hospital pharmacy computerized inventory program in Haiti.

Holm MR, Rudis MI, Wilson JW - Glob Health Action (2015)

Pharmacy computerized information system: central pharmacy medication inventory. Adding a new drug by the pharmacy staff when a shipment arrives involves searching for the drug by the first few letters or scrolling (similar to the nursing staff side) and then selecting the desired drug. After selecting the drug of choice, the pharmacy staff may change the quantity, expiration date, etc. If the drug is a new drug, then each field is filled in by the pharmacy staff.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4306749&req=5

Figure 0003: Pharmacy computerized information system: central pharmacy medication inventory. Adding a new drug by the pharmacy staff when a shipment arrives involves searching for the drug by the first few letters or scrolling (similar to the nursing staff side) and then selecting the desired drug. After selecting the drug of choice, the pharmacy staff may change the quantity, expiration date, etc. If the drug is a new drug, then each field is filled in by the pharmacy staff.
Mentions: The PCIP was developed based on the completed needs assessment. The medication request and fill process is illustrated in Fig. 1.Figure 2–4illustrate screenshots as viewed by individuals using the PCIP system during the medication request and fill process. Figure 2 shows the screens for nurses and providers to enter online medication requests. Figure 3 depicts the screens used by central pharmacy to add a new medication to the inventory, and to maintain or adjust quantities of medications available. Figure 4 displays the off-line medication stock request cards designed for use in circumstances when the web-based PCIP program is unavailable.

Bottom Line: We hypothesized that the implementation of a new Pharmacy Computerized Inventory Program (PCIP) would optimize medication availability and decrease medication shortages.The pharmacy and nursing staff found the PCIP to be efficient and a significant improvement in their medication utilization.An efficient, customizable, and cost-sensitive PCIP can improve drug inventory management in a simplified and sustainable manner within a resource-constrained hospital.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pharmacy, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; holm.michelle@mayo.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: In the aftermath of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, St. Luke Hospital was built to help manage the mass casualties and subsequent cholera epidemic. A major problem faced by the hospital system was the lack of an available and sustainable supply of medications. Long-term viability of the hospital system depended largely on developing an uninterrupted medication supply chain.

Objective: We hypothesized that the implementation of a new Pharmacy Computerized Inventory Program (PCIP) would optimize medication availability and decrease medication shortages.

Design: We conducted the research by examining how medications were being utilized and distributed before and after the implementation of PCIP. We measured the number of documented medication transactions in both Phase 1 and Phase 2 as well as user logins to determine if a computerized inventory system would be beneficial in providing a sustainable, long-term solution to their medication management needs.

Results: The PCIP incorporated drug ordering, filling the drug requests, distribution, and dispensing of the medications in multiple settings; inventory of currently shelved medications; and graphic reporting of 'real-time' medication usage. During the PCIP initiation and establishment periods, the number of medication transactions increased from 219.6 to 359.5 (p=0.055), respectively, and the mean logins per day increased from 24.3 to 31.5, p<0.0001, respectively. The PCIP allows the hospital staff to identify and order medications with a critically low supply as well as track usage for future medication needs. The pharmacy and nursing staff found the PCIP to be efficient and a significant improvement in their medication utilization.

Conclusions: An efficient, customizable, and cost-sensitive PCIP can improve drug inventory management in a simplified and sustainable manner within a resource-constrained hospital.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus