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Water-air CO2 fluxes in the Tagus estuary plume (Portugal) during two distinct winter episodes.

Oliveira AP, Mateus MD, Cabeçadas G, Neves R - Carbon Balance Manag (2015)

Bottom Line: A hydrodynamic model was used to simulate the circulation regime of the study area, thus providing relevant information on hydrodynamic processes controlling the plume.The freshwater intrusion on Tagus shelf exerted considerable influence on biochemical dynamics, allowing identification of two regions: a high nutrient region enriched in CO2 inside the estuarine plume and another warmer region rich in phytoplankton in the outer plume.The Tagus estuarine plume behaved as a weak source of CO2 to the atmosphere, with estimated fluxes of 3.5 ± 3.7 and 27.0 ± 3.8 mmol C m(-2) d(-1) for February 2004 and March 2001, respectively.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Instituto Português do Mar e da Atmosfera (IPMA), I.P., Avenida de Brasília, 1449-006 Lisboa, Portugal.

ABSTRACT

Background: Estuarine plumes are frequently under strong influence of land-derived inputs of organic matter. These plumes have characteristic physical and chemical conditions, and their morphology and extent in the coastal area depends strongly on physical conditions such as river discharge, tides and wind action. In this work we investigate the physical dynamics of the Tagus estuary plume and the CO2 system response during two contrasting hydrological winter periods. A hydrodynamic model was used to simulate the circulation regime of the study area, thus providing relevant information on hydrodynamic processes controlling the plume.

Results: Model simulations show that for the studied periods, the major cause of the plume variability (size and shape) was the interaction between Tagus River discharge and wind. The freshwater intrusion on Tagus shelf exerted considerable influence on biochemical dynamics, allowing identification of two regions: a high nutrient region enriched in CO2 inside the estuarine plume and another warmer region rich in phytoplankton in the outer plume.

Conclusions: The Tagus estuarine plume behaved as a weak source of CO2 to the atmosphere, with estimated fluxes of 3.5 ± 3.7 and 27.0 ± 3.8 mmol C m(-2) d(-1) for February 2004 and March 2001, respectively.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Location of the study site. Location of the sampling stations in the mouth of the Tagus estuary (SW Portugal) and adjacent coastal area. The position of the Guia meteorological station (38°41’27” N, 9°27’34” W) is marked with a star.
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Fig1: Location of the study site. Location of the sampling stations in the mouth of the Tagus estuary (SW Portugal) and adjacent coastal area. The position of the Guia meteorological station (38°41’27” N, 9°27’34” W) is marked with a star.

Mentions: This paper aims to characterize the dynamics of water-air CO2 flux in the Tagus estuarine plume (Figure 1) during two contrasting winter periods, based on the pCO2 dynamics derived from field data. Underlying controlling mechanisms have been investigated based on the river discharge, the role of temperature and the biological activity. This study merges field data retrieved by experimental methods with information derived from the results of a numerical model on the spatial and temporal variability of the physical structure of the plume.Figure 1


Water-air CO2 fluxes in the Tagus estuary plume (Portugal) during two distinct winter episodes.

Oliveira AP, Mateus MD, Cabeçadas G, Neves R - Carbon Balance Manag (2015)

Location of the study site. Location of the sampling stations in the mouth of the Tagus estuary (SW Portugal) and adjacent coastal area. The position of the Guia meteorological station (38°41’27” N, 9°27’34” W) is marked with a star.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4306733&req=5

Fig1: Location of the study site. Location of the sampling stations in the mouth of the Tagus estuary (SW Portugal) and adjacent coastal area. The position of the Guia meteorological station (38°41’27” N, 9°27’34” W) is marked with a star.
Mentions: This paper aims to characterize the dynamics of water-air CO2 flux in the Tagus estuarine plume (Figure 1) during two contrasting winter periods, based on the pCO2 dynamics derived from field data. Underlying controlling mechanisms have been investigated based on the river discharge, the role of temperature and the biological activity. This study merges field data retrieved by experimental methods with information derived from the results of a numerical model on the spatial and temporal variability of the physical structure of the plume.Figure 1

Bottom Line: A hydrodynamic model was used to simulate the circulation regime of the study area, thus providing relevant information on hydrodynamic processes controlling the plume.The freshwater intrusion on Tagus shelf exerted considerable influence on biochemical dynamics, allowing identification of two regions: a high nutrient region enriched in CO2 inside the estuarine plume and another warmer region rich in phytoplankton in the outer plume.The Tagus estuarine plume behaved as a weak source of CO2 to the atmosphere, with estimated fluxes of 3.5 ± 3.7 and 27.0 ± 3.8 mmol C m(-2) d(-1) for February 2004 and March 2001, respectively.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Instituto Português do Mar e da Atmosfera (IPMA), I.P., Avenida de Brasília, 1449-006 Lisboa, Portugal.

ABSTRACT

Background: Estuarine plumes are frequently under strong influence of land-derived inputs of organic matter. These plumes have characteristic physical and chemical conditions, and their morphology and extent in the coastal area depends strongly on physical conditions such as river discharge, tides and wind action. In this work we investigate the physical dynamics of the Tagus estuary plume and the CO2 system response during two contrasting hydrological winter periods. A hydrodynamic model was used to simulate the circulation regime of the study area, thus providing relevant information on hydrodynamic processes controlling the plume.

Results: Model simulations show that for the studied periods, the major cause of the plume variability (size and shape) was the interaction between Tagus River discharge and wind. The freshwater intrusion on Tagus shelf exerted considerable influence on biochemical dynamics, allowing identification of two regions: a high nutrient region enriched in CO2 inside the estuarine plume and another warmer region rich in phytoplankton in the outer plume.

Conclusions: The Tagus estuarine plume behaved as a weak source of CO2 to the atmosphere, with estimated fluxes of 3.5 ± 3.7 and 27.0 ± 3.8 mmol C m(-2) d(-1) for February 2004 and March 2001, respectively.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus