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On the subjective acceptance during cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging at 7.0 Tesla.

Klix S, Els A, Paul K, Graessl A, Oezerdem C, Weinberger O, Winter L, Thalhammer C, Huelnhagen T, Rieger J, Mehling H, Schulz-Menger J, Niendorf T - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Transient muscular contraction was documented in 12.7% of the questionnaires.No severe side effects as vomiting or syncope after scanning occurred.No increase in heart rate was observed during the UHF-CMR exam versus the baseline clinical examination.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility (B.U.F.F.), Max-Delbrueck-Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This study examines the subjective acceptance during UHF-CMR in a cohort of healthy volunteers who underwent a cardiac MR examination at 7.0T.

Methods: Within a period of two-and-a-half years (January 2012 to June 2014) a total of 165 healthy volunteers (41 female, 124 male) without any known history of cardiac disease underwent UHF-CMR. For the assessment of the subjective acceptance a questionnaire was used to examine the participants experience prior, during and after the UHF-CMR examination. For this purpose, subjects were asked to respond to the questionnaire in an exit interview held immediately after the completion of the UHF-CMR examination under supervision of a study nurse to ensure accurate understanding of the questions. All questions were answered with "yes" or "no" including space for additional comments.

Results: Transient muscular contraction was documented in 12.7% of the questionnaires. Muscular contraction was reported to occur only during periods of scanning with the magnetic field gradients being rapidly switched. Dizziness during the study was reported by 12.7% of the subjects. Taste of metal was reported by 10.1% of the study population. Light flashes were reported by 3.6% of the entire cohort. 13% of the subjects reported side effects/observations which were not explicitly listed in the questionnaire but covered by the question about other side effects. No severe side effects as vomiting or syncope after scanning occurred. No increase in heart rate was observed during the UHF-CMR exam versus the baseline clinical examination.

Conclusions: This study adds to the literature by detailing the subjective acceptance of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging examinations at a magnetic field strength of 7.0T. Cardiac MR examinations at 7.0T are well tolerated by healthy subjects. Broader observational and multi-center studies including patient cohorts with cardiac diseases are required to gain further insights into the subjective acceptance of UHF-CMR examinations.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Results derived from the completed questionnaires.Synopsis of the results reported by 165 subjects on subjective acceptance of UHF-CMR. The most mentioned side effects reported were transient muscular contraction during scanning (12.7%) and dizziness experienced during the study (12.7%).
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pone.0117095.g002: Results derived from the completed questionnaires.Synopsis of the results reported by 165 subjects on subjective acceptance of UHF-CMR. The most mentioned side effects reported were transient muscular contraction during scanning (12.7%) and dizziness experienced during the study (12.7%).

Mentions: A synopsis of the evaluation of the questionnaires is provided in Fig. 2. The gender distribution of the reported sensory side effects is shown in detail in Fig. 3. Major differences in response to question 1–9 were not observed for the RF coil configurations used; with the exception of question 8 for which Pearson’s analysis provided p = 0.015.


On the subjective acceptance during cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging at 7.0 Tesla.

Klix S, Els A, Paul K, Graessl A, Oezerdem C, Weinberger O, Winter L, Thalhammer C, Huelnhagen T, Rieger J, Mehling H, Schulz-Menger J, Niendorf T - PLoS ONE (2015)

Results derived from the completed questionnaires.Synopsis of the results reported by 165 subjects on subjective acceptance of UHF-CMR. The most mentioned side effects reported were transient muscular contraction during scanning (12.7%) and dizziness experienced during the study (12.7%).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4306482&req=5

pone.0117095.g002: Results derived from the completed questionnaires.Synopsis of the results reported by 165 subjects on subjective acceptance of UHF-CMR. The most mentioned side effects reported were transient muscular contraction during scanning (12.7%) and dizziness experienced during the study (12.7%).
Mentions: A synopsis of the evaluation of the questionnaires is provided in Fig. 2. The gender distribution of the reported sensory side effects is shown in detail in Fig. 3. Major differences in response to question 1–9 were not observed for the RF coil configurations used; with the exception of question 8 for which Pearson’s analysis provided p = 0.015.

Bottom Line: Transient muscular contraction was documented in 12.7% of the questionnaires.No severe side effects as vomiting or syncope after scanning occurred.No increase in heart rate was observed during the UHF-CMR exam versus the baseline clinical examination.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility (B.U.F.F.), Max-Delbrueck-Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This study examines the subjective acceptance during UHF-CMR in a cohort of healthy volunteers who underwent a cardiac MR examination at 7.0T.

Methods: Within a period of two-and-a-half years (January 2012 to June 2014) a total of 165 healthy volunteers (41 female, 124 male) without any known history of cardiac disease underwent UHF-CMR. For the assessment of the subjective acceptance a questionnaire was used to examine the participants experience prior, during and after the UHF-CMR examination. For this purpose, subjects were asked to respond to the questionnaire in an exit interview held immediately after the completion of the UHF-CMR examination under supervision of a study nurse to ensure accurate understanding of the questions. All questions were answered with "yes" or "no" including space for additional comments.

Results: Transient muscular contraction was documented in 12.7% of the questionnaires. Muscular contraction was reported to occur only during periods of scanning with the magnetic field gradients being rapidly switched. Dizziness during the study was reported by 12.7% of the subjects. Taste of metal was reported by 10.1% of the study population. Light flashes were reported by 3.6% of the entire cohort. 13% of the subjects reported side effects/observations which were not explicitly listed in the questionnaire but covered by the question about other side effects. No severe side effects as vomiting or syncope after scanning occurred. No increase in heart rate was observed during the UHF-CMR exam versus the baseline clinical examination.

Conclusions: This study adds to the literature by detailing the subjective acceptance of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging examinations at a magnetic field strength of 7.0T. Cardiac MR examinations at 7.0T are well tolerated by healthy subjects. Broader observational and multi-center studies including patient cohorts with cardiac diseases are required to gain further insights into the subjective acceptance of UHF-CMR examinations.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus