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Maxillofacial Fractures due to Falls: does Fall Modality Determine the Pattern of Injury?

Roccia F, Boffano P, Bianchi FA, Zavattero E - J Oral Maxillofac Res (2014)

Bottom Line: The middle third of the face was affected most frequently.After LOCF, however, the inferior third was prevalently involved.This study showed that fracture severity and site are influenced not only by patient age, but also by the nature of the fall.

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Affiliation: Surgical Science Department, San Giovanni Battista Hospital, University of Turin, Turin Italy.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: In several epidemiological studies of maxillofacial trauma, falls were one of the most frequent causes of facial injury. The aim of this study is to analyse the patterns of fall-related maxillofacial injuries based on the height of the fall.

Material and methods: Using a systematic computer-assisted database of patients hospitalised with maxillofacial fractures, only those with fall-related injuries were considered. The falls were divided into four groups: falls from slipping, tripping or stumbling (STSF), loss of consciousness (LOCF), stairs (SAF), and height (HF). Data on the age, gender, fracture site, Facial Injury Severity Scale (FISS), facial lacerations, associated lesions, type of treatment, and length of hospital stay were also analysed.

Results: This study included 557 patients (338 males, 219 females; average age 51.5 years [range 4 - 99 years]). In the over 60 age group, females were more prevalent in STSF than males. According to aetiology, STSF was the most frequent cause of maxillofacial fractures (315 patients; 56.5%) followed by LOCF (157; 28.2%), HF (55; 9.9%), and SAF (30; 5.4%). The middle third of the face was affected most frequently. After LOCF, however, the inferior third was prevalently involved. The majority of associated fractures, as well as the most severe injuries and greatest rate of facial lacerations, occurred secondary to HF.

Conclusions: This study showed that fracture severity and site are influenced not only by patient age, but also by the nature of the fall.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Modified MCFONTZL classification of facial lacerations [24].
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fig4: Modified MCFONTZL classification of facial lacerations [24].

Mentions: Overall, 207 patients (37.2%) had 232 facial lacerations. Half of these were localised to the lower third of the face, mainly in the chin region. As shown in Figure 4, most facial lacerations were located between the upper eyelids, or on the forehead, nose, upper and lower lips, and chin. If we consider the facial lacerations according to the type of fall, a greater rate of lacerations per patient was observed in HF falls (Figure 5).


Maxillofacial Fractures due to Falls: does Fall Modality Determine the Pattern of Injury?

Roccia F, Boffano P, Bianchi FA, Zavattero E - J Oral Maxillofac Res (2014)

Modified MCFONTZL classification of facial lacerations [24].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4306323&req=5

fig4: Modified MCFONTZL classification of facial lacerations [24].
Mentions: Overall, 207 patients (37.2%) had 232 facial lacerations. Half of these were localised to the lower third of the face, mainly in the chin region. As shown in Figure 4, most facial lacerations were located between the upper eyelids, or on the forehead, nose, upper and lower lips, and chin. If we consider the facial lacerations according to the type of fall, a greater rate of lacerations per patient was observed in HF falls (Figure 5).

Bottom Line: The middle third of the face was affected most frequently.After LOCF, however, the inferior third was prevalently involved.This study showed that fracture severity and site are influenced not only by patient age, but also by the nature of the fall.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Surgical Science Department, San Giovanni Battista Hospital, University of Turin, Turin Italy.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: In several epidemiological studies of maxillofacial trauma, falls were one of the most frequent causes of facial injury. The aim of this study is to analyse the patterns of fall-related maxillofacial injuries based on the height of the fall.

Material and methods: Using a systematic computer-assisted database of patients hospitalised with maxillofacial fractures, only those with fall-related injuries were considered. The falls were divided into four groups: falls from slipping, tripping or stumbling (STSF), loss of consciousness (LOCF), stairs (SAF), and height (HF). Data on the age, gender, fracture site, Facial Injury Severity Scale (FISS), facial lacerations, associated lesions, type of treatment, and length of hospital stay were also analysed.

Results: This study included 557 patients (338 males, 219 females; average age 51.5 years [range 4 - 99 years]). In the over 60 age group, females were more prevalent in STSF than males. According to aetiology, STSF was the most frequent cause of maxillofacial fractures (315 patients; 56.5%) followed by LOCF (157; 28.2%), HF (55; 9.9%), and SAF (30; 5.4%). The middle third of the face was affected most frequently. After LOCF, however, the inferior third was prevalently involved. The majority of associated fractures, as well as the most severe injuries and greatest rate of facial lacerations, occurred secondary to HF.

Conclusions: This study showed that fracture severity and site are influenced not only by patient age, but also by the nature of the fall.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus