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Post-error action control is neurobehaviorally modulated under conditions of constant speeded response.

Soshi T, Ando K, Noda T, Nakazawa K, Tsumura H, Okada T - Front Hum Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: Error recovery often malfunctions in clinical populations, but the relationship between behavioral traits and recovery from error is unclear in healthy populations.The present study investigated the relationship between impulsivity and error recovery by simulating a speeded response situation using a Go/No-go paradigm that forced the participants to constantly make accelerated responses prior to stimuli disappearance (stimulus duration: 250 ms).These findings suggest that there may be clinical and practical efficacy of maintaining cognitive control of actions during error recovery under common daily environments that frequently evoke impulsive behaviors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Forensic Psychiatry, National Institute of Mental Health, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry Kodairo, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Post-error slowing (PES) is an error recovery strategy that contributes to action control, and occurs after errors in order to prevent future behavioral flaws. Error recovery often malfunctions in clinical populations, but the relationship between behavioral traits and recovery from error is unclear in healthy populations. The present study investigated the relationship between impulsivity and error recovery by simulating a speeded response situation using a Go/No-go paradigm that forced the participants to constantly make accelerated responses prior to stimuli disappearance (stimulus duration: 250 ms). Neural correlates of post-error processing were examined using event-related potentials (ERPs). Impulsivity traits were measured with self-report questionnaires (BIS-11, BIS/BAS). Behavioral results demonstrated that the commission error for No-go trials was 15%, but PES did not take place immediately. Delayed PES was negatively correlated with error rates and impulsivity traits, showing that response slowing was associated with reduced error rates and changed with impulsivity. Response-locked error ERPs were clearly observed for the error trials. Contrary to previous studies, error ERPs were not significantly related to PES. Stimulus-locked N2 was negatively correlated with PES and positively correlated with impulsivity traits at the second post-error Go trial: larger N2 activity was associated with greater PES and less impulsivity. In summary, under constant speeded conditions, error monitoring was dissociated from post-error action control, and PES did not occur quickly. Furthermore, PES and its neural correlate (N2) were modulated by impulsivity traits. These findings suggest that there may be clinical and practical efficacy of maintaining cognitive control of actions during error recovery under common daily environments that frequently evoke impulsive behaviors.

No MeSH data available.


(A) Negative correlation between PES and N2 (Fz) for the second post-error Go trial (PoER2). PES is represented by the ratio between post- and pre-error RTs. Scores greater indicate larger PES. (B) Positive correlation between N2 (Fz) for the PoER2 trial and reward responsiveness (RR). (C) Negative correlation between N2 (Fz) for the first post-error Go trial (PoER1) and motor impulsiveness (MI).
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Figure 6: (A) Negative correlation between PES and N2 (Fz) for the second post-error Go trial (PoER2). PES is represented by the ratio between post- and pre-error RTs. Scores greater indicate larger PES. (B) Positive correlation between N2 (Fz) for the PoER2 trial and reward responsiveness (RR). (C) Negative correlation between N2 (Fz) for the first post-error Go trial (PoER1) and motor impulsiveness (MI).

Mentions: Correlational relationships were first examined between N2 amplitudes and behavioral performances. The output coefficients are summarized in Table 3. N2 for the PoER2 trial was negatively correlated with the RT ratio for the PoER2 trial (Fz: r = –0.623, p = 0.0002; Cz: r = –0.568, p = 0.006), showing that greater (more negative) N2 activity was associated with greater PES (Figure 6A for Fz). This correlation was also significant when age and sex were controlled [Fz: rxy⋅z (partial correlation coefficient) = –0.588, p = 0.006; Cz: rxy⋅z = –0.50, p = 0.025]. N2 for the PoER1 trial was not significantly correlated with the RT ratio for the PoER1 trial. N2 components for both post-error trials were not significantly correlated with commission error rates.


Post-error action control is neurobehaviorally modulated under conditions of constant speeded response.

Soshi T, Ando K, Noda T, Nakazawa K, Tsumura H, Okada T - Front Hum Neurosci (2015)

(A) Negative correlation between PES and N2 (Fz) for the second post-error Go trial (PoER2). PES is represented by the ratio between post- and pre-error RTs. Scores greater indicate larger PES. (B) Positive correlation between N2 (Fz) for the PoER2 trial and reward responsiveness (RR). (C) Negative correlation between N2 (Fz) for the first post-error Go trial (PoER1) and motor impulsiveness (MI).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4306303&req=5

Figure 6: (A) Negative correlation between PES and N2 (Fz) for the second post-error Go trial (PoER2). PES is represented by the ratio between post- and pre-error RTs. Scores greater indicate larger PES. (B) Positive correlation between N2 (Fz) for the PoER2 trial and reward responsiveness (RR). (C) Negative correlation between N2 (Fz) for the first post-error Go trial (PoER1) and motor impulsiveness (MI).
Mentions: Correlational relationships were first examined between N2 amplitudes and behavioral performances. The output coefficients are summarized in Table 3. N2 for the PoER2 trial was negatively correlated with the RT ratio for the PoER2 trial (Fz: r = –0.623, p = 0.0002; Cz: r = –0.568, p = 0.006), showing that greater (more negative) N2 activity was associated with greater PES (Figure 6A for Fz). This correlation was also significant when age and sex were controlled [Fz: rxy⋅z (partial correlation coefficient) = –0.588, p = 0.006; Cz: rxy⋅z = –0.50, p = 0.025]. N2 for the PoER1 trial was not significantly correlated with the RT ratio for the PoER1 trial. N2 components for both post-error trials were not significantly correlated with commission error rates.

Bottom Line: Error recovery often malfunctions in clinical populations, but the relationship between behavioral traits and recovery from error is unclear in healthy populations.The present study investigated the relationship between impulsivity and error recovery by simulating a speeded response situation using a Go/No-go paradigm that forced the participants to constantly make accelerated responses prior to stimuli disappearance (stimulus duration: 250 ms).These findings suggest that there may be clinical and practical efficacy of maintaining cognitive control of actions during error recovery under common daily environments that frequently evoke impulsive behaviors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Forensic Psychiatry, National Institute of Mental Health, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry Kodairo, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Post-error slowing (PES) is an error recovery strategy that contributes to action control, and occurs after errors in order to prevent future behavioral flaws. Error recovery often malfunctions in clinical populations, but the relationship between behavioral traits and recovery from error is unclear in healthy populations. The present study investigated the relationship between impulsivity and error recovery by simulating a speeded response situation using a Go/No-go paradigm that forced the participants to constantly make accelerated responses prior to stimuli disappearance (stimulus duration: 250 ms). Neural correlates of post-error processing were examined using event-related potentials (ERPs). Impulsivity traits were measured with self-report questionnaires (BIS-11, BIS/BAS). Behavioral results demonstrated that the commission error for No-go trials was 15%, but PES did not take place immediately. Delayed PES was negatively correlated with error rates and impulsivity traits, showing that response slowing was associated with reduced error rates and changed with impulsivity. Response-locked error ERPs were clearly observed for the error trials. Contrary to previous studies, error ERPs were not significantly related to PES. Stimulus-locked N2 was negatively correlated with PES and positively correlated with impulsivity traits at the second post-error Go trial: larger N2 activity was associated with greater PES and less impulsivity. In summary, under constant speeded conditions, error monitoring was dissociated from post-error action control, and PES did not occur quickly. Furthermore, PES and its neural correlate (N2) were modulated by impulsivity traits. These findings suggest that there may be clinical and practical efficacy of maintaining cognitive control of actions during error recovery under common daily environments that frequently evoke impulsive behaviors.

No MeSH data available.