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Protective effect of sodium nitroprusside on the rat small intestine transplanted mucosa.

Chen FH, Li K, Yin L, Chen CQ, Yan ZW, Chen GM - Biochem Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: Interestingly, the pre-SNP graft samples exhibited less damage compared to the SBT and post-SNP samples.In addition, mucosal samples from the pre-SNP group showed higher Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity and higher levels of laminin expression compared to the SBT and post-SNP samples.The findings of the present study reveal that SNP given before graft ischemia/reperfusion injury has a protective effect on mucosal histology and molecular markers of function in the transplanted small intestine.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ultrasound Department, Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai 200090, China.

ABSTRACT
The intestinal mucosal epithelium is extremely susceptible to even brief periods of ischemia. Mucosal barrier damage, which is associated with ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and consequently bacterial translocation, remains a major obstacle for clinically successful small bowel transplantation (SBT). Previous studies have demonstrated a protective effect of nitric oxide (NO) on other transplanted organs and NO mediated intestinal protection has also been reported in vitro. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of sodium nitroprusside (SNP), NO donor, on graft mucosal histology and molecular markers of function after SBT in rats. We used SNP in different period of heterotopic SBT rats. The groups consisted of SBT, pre-SNP group, and post-SNP group. Interestingly, the pre-SNP graft samples exhibited less damage compared to the SBT and post-SNP samples. In addition, mucosal samples from the pre-SNP group showed higher Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity and higher levels of laminin expression compared to the SBT and post-SNP samples. The findings of the present study reveal that SNP given before graft ischemia/reperfusion injury has a protective effect on mucosal histology and molecular markers of function in the transplanted small intestine.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Vessel reconstruction: donor graft's cuffed portal vein is inserted into left renal vein of the recipient and an end to side anastomosis is performed between SMA and the abdominal aorta. The right picture shows a typical graft 20 seconds after artery anastomosis and vein insertion and demonstrates good blood circulation in the graft.
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fig1: Vessel reconstruction: donor graft's cuffed portal vein is inserted into left renal vein of the recipient and an end to side anastomosis is performed between SMA and the abdominal aorta. The right picture shows a typical graft 20 seconds after artery anastomosis and vein insertion and demonstrates good blood circulation in the graft.

Mentions: The H-SBT model was based on the modified classical method [8] and performed consistently by the same surgical team. The cuff technique was used for venous reconstruction. Briefly, the donor small bowel vasculature was perfused with LR solution through the superior mesenteric aorta in vivo after branch ligation and clamping of the superior and inferior aorta leaving the portal vein patent. Twenty centimeters of small bowel 5 cm distal to the ligament of Treitz isolated on the superior mesenteric vascular pedicle attached to stumps of the aorta and portal vein was used for the graft. After harvest, the intestinal lumen was gently cleared with LR solution and the graft was stored on ice at 4°C until transplantation. The donor portal vein was cuffed (a manual cuff was made using a 2 mm DSA tube) and ligated to the recipient left kidney vein (left kidney was resected) to reconstruct venous outflow, and an aortic patch was anastomosed end to side to the recipient infrarenal aorta by running suture to reconstruct arterial inflow. The oral end of the transplanted intestine was closed and the distal end exteriorized through the left lower abdominal wall creating a cutaneous stoma (Figure 1). Intestinal samples for molecular analysis were harvested 72 hours after transplantation through the graft stoma, frozen in liquid nitrogen, and stored at −80°C until further use.


Protective effect of sodium nitroprusside on the rat small intestine transplanted mucosa.

Chen FH, Li K, Yin L, Chen CQ, Yan ZW, Chen GM - Biochem Res Int (2015)

Vessel reconstruction: donor graft's cuffed portal vein is inserted into left renal vein of the recipient and an end to side anastomosis is performed between SMA and the abdominal aorta. The right picture shows a typical graft 20 seconds after artery anastomosis and vein insertion and demonstrates good blood circulation in the graft.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4306256&req=5

fig1: Vessel reconstruction: donor graft's cuffed portal vein is inserted into left renal vein of the recipient and an end to side anastomosis is performed between SMA and the abdominal aorta. The right picture shows a typical graft 20 seconds after artery anastomosis and vein insertion and demonstrates good blood circulation in the graft.
Mentions: The H-SBT model was based on the modified classical method [8] and performed consistently by the same surgical team. The cuff technique was used for venous reconstruction. Briefly, the donor small bowel vasculature was perfused with LR solution through the superior mesenteric aorta in vivo after branch ligation and clamping of the superior and inferior aorta leaving the portal vein patent. Twenty centimeters of small bowel 5 cm distal to the ligament of Treitz isolated on the superior mesenteric vascular pedicle attached to stumps of the aorta and portal vein was used for the graft. After harvest, the intestinal lumen was gently cleared with LR solution and the graft was stored on ice at 4°C until transplantation. The donor portal vein was cuffed (a manual cuff was made using a 2 mm DSA tube) and ligated to the recipient left kidney vein (left kidney was resected) to reconstruct venous outflow, and an aortic patch was anastomosed end to side to the recipient infrarenal aorta by running suture to reconstruct arterial inflow. The oral end of the transplanted intestine was closed and the distal end exteriorized through the left lower abdominal wall creating a cutaneous stoma (Figure 1). Intestinal samples for molecular analysis were harvested 72 hours after transplantation through the graft stoma, frozen in liquid nitrogen, and stored at −80°C until further use.

Bottom Line: Interestingly, the pre-SNP graft samples exhibited less damage compared to the SBT and post-SNP samples.In addition, mucosal samples from the pre-SNP group showed higher Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity and higher levels of laminin expression compared to the SBT and post-SNP samples.The findings of the present study reveal that SNP given before graft ischemia/reperfusion injury has a protective effect on mucosal histology and molecular markers of function in the transplanted small intestine.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ultrasound Department, Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai 200090, China.

ABSTRACT
The intestinal mucosal epithelium is extremely susceptible to even brief periods of ischemia. Mucosal barrier damage, which is associated with ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and consequently bacterial translocation, remains a major obstacle for clinically successful small bowel transplantation (SBT). Previous studies have demonstrated a protective effect of nitric oxide (NO) on other transplanted organs and NO mediated intestinal protection has also been reported in vitro. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of sodium nitroprusside (SNP), NO donor, on graft mucosal histology and molecular markers of function after SBT in rats. We used SNP in different period of heterotopic SBT rats. The groups consisted of SBT, pre-SNP group, and post-SNP group. Interestingly, the pre-SNP graft samples exhibited less damage compared to the SBT and post-SNP samples. In addition, mucosal samples from the pre-SNP group showed higher Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity and higher levels of laminin expression compared to the SBT and post-SNP samples. The findings of the present study reveal that SNP given before graft ischemia/reperfusion injury has a protective effect on mucosal histology and molecular markers of function in the transplanted small intestine.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus