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Transient middle cerebral artery occlusion with complete reperfusion in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

Hill JW, Nemoto EM - MethodsX (2014)

Bottom Line: Middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) by the intraluminal suture method is widely used to model ischemic stroke in rats.Current methods include transection or ligation of the external carotid or common carotid artery and thus result in partial restoration of perfusion after transient MCAO.Advantages of the method include: MCAO is achieved through insertion of an intraluminal suture into the internal carotid artery through the common carotid artery.At the end of the occlusion period, the suture is withdrawn and the incision in the common carotid artery is closed with cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive and complete reperfusion is established.No residual subcutaneous sutures remain during recovery.Vasculature is restored to the preoperative state.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 87131.

ABSTRACT

Middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) by the intraluminal suture method is widely used to model ischemic stroke in rats. Current methods include transection or ligation of the external carotid or common carotid artery and thus result in partial restoration of perfusion after transient MCAO. Since incomplete reperfusion may influence recovery and thus confound studies of the impact of neuroprotective compounds and therapies on outcomes after stroke, we have devised a novel method to induce transient MCAO with complete reperfusion. Advantages of the method include: MCAO is achieved through insertion of an intraluminal suture into the internal carotid artery through the common carotid artery.At the end of the occlusion period, the suture is withdrawn and the incision in the common carotid artery is closed with cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive and complete reperfusion is established.No residual subcutaneous sutures remain during recovery.Vasculature is restored to the preoperative state.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Verification of proper insertion of the occluding suture. The suture is held on the end with forceps (lower arrow) and bent toward the midline while gently advancing it into the ICA until flexion of the suture is observed through the lateral wall of the ICA (upper arrow).
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fig0020: Verification of proper insertion of the occluding suture. The suture is held on the end with forceps (lower arrow) and bent toward the midline while gently advancing it into the ICA until flexion of the suture is observed through the lateral wall of the ICA (upper arrow).

Mentions: A punctate incision is made in the ventral wall of the CCA with a 25G needle 5 mm caudal to the clamp and a 4–0 nylon suture (Doccol Corporation) 30 mm in length with a 2–3 mm silicone-coated tip (0.39 mm diameter) is advanced into the CCA lumen to the clamp. The lower silk suture is secured around the occluding suture to prevent bleeding (Fig. 3). The clamp is removed and the suture advanced into the ICA until resistance is felt. In the correct position, the end of the suture should be roughly at the caudal end of the surgical field. If resistance is felt while much of the suture is outside the surgical field, the suture may have entered the pterygopalatine artery. If this occurs, the suture is pulled back to the bifurcation and reinserted while attempting to direct it toward the midline. To ensure proper placement of the occluding suture once resistance is felt, the suture is grasped with forceps, bent toward the midline, and gently pushed forward into the ICA until flexion of the suture can be visualized through the lateral wall of the ICA (Fig. 4). Care must be taken during this step to not insert the suture pass the point of visualizing flexion through the ICA or the ICA may be punctured by the suture and result in subarachnoid hemorrhage. Additionally, flexion of the occluding suture should be visualized only once to prevent stretching of the ICA which can result in increased variability in infarction. After flexion of the suture has been observed, the suture is immediately secured in place by tightening the two silk sutures around the CCA and trimming off the end of the occluding suture with micro scissors (Fig. 5). In this position, the suture occludes the middle cerebral artery (MCA) origin and MCA territory becomes ischemic. Note the position of the end of the occluding suture in relation to the caudal suture occluding the CCA. This observation is useful in determining if any movement of the occluding suture occurred during the occlusion period. The wound is closed and the animal is allowed to recover during the 90-min occlusion period.


Transient middle cerebral artery occlusion with complete reperfusion in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

Hill JW, Nemoto EM - MethodsX (2014)

Verification of proper insertion of the occluding suture. The suture is held on the end with forceps (lower arrow) and bent toward the midline while gently advancing it into the ICA until flexion of the suture is observed through the lateral wall of the ICA (upper arrow).
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4306192&req=5

fig0020: Verification of proper insertion of the occluding suture. The suture is held on the end with forceps (lower arrow) and bent toward the midline while gently advancing it into the ICA until flexion of the suture is observed through the lateral wall of the ICA (upper arrow).
Mentions: A punctate incision is made in the ventral wall of the CCA with a 25G needle 5 mm caudal to the clamp and a 4–0 nylon suture (Doccol Corporation) 30 mm in length with a 2–3 mm silicone-coated tip (0.39 mm diameter) is advanced into the CCA lumen to the clamp. The lower silk suture is secured around the occluding suture to prevent bleeding (Fig. 3). The clamp is removed and the suture advanced into the ICA until resistance is felt. In the correct position, the end of the suture should be roughly at the caudal end of the surgical field. If resistance is felt while much of the suture is outside the surgical field, the suture may have entered the pterygopalatine artery. If this occurs, the suture is pulled back to the bifurcation and reinserted while attempting to direct it toward the midline. To ensure proper placement of the occluding suture once resistance is felt, the suture is grasped with forceps, bent toward the midline, and gently pushed forward into the ICA until flexion of the suture can be visualized through the lateral wall of the ICA (Fig. 4). Care must be taken during this step to not insert the suture pass the point of visualizing flexion through the ICA or the ICA may be punctured by the suture and result in subarachnoid hemorrhage. Additionally, flexion of the occluding suture should be visualized only once to prevent stretching of the ICA which can result in increased variability in infarction. After flexion of the suture has been observed, the suture is immediately secured in place by tightening the two silk sutures around the CCA and trimming off the end of the occluding suture with micro scissors (Fig. 5). In this position, the suture occludes the middle cerebral artery (MCA) origin and MCA territory becomes ischemic. Note the position of the end of the occluding suture in relation to the caudal suture occluding the CCA. This observation is useful in determining if any movement of the occluding suture occurred during the occlusion period. The wound is closed and the animal is allowed to recover during the 90-min occlusion period.

Bottom Line: Middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) by the intraluminal suture method is widely used to model ischemic stroke in rats.Current methods include transection or ligation of the external carotid or common carotid artery and thus result in partial restoration of perfusion after transient MCAO.Advantages of the method include: MCAO is achieved through insertion of an intraluminal suture into the internal carotid artery through the common carotid artery.At the end of the occlusion period, the suture is withdrawn and the incision in the common carotid artery is closed with cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive and complete reperfusion is established.No residual subcutaneous sutures remain during recovery.Vasculature is restored to the preoperative state.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 87131.

ABSTRACT

Middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) by the intraluminal suture method is widely used to model ischemic stroke in rats. Current methods include transection or ligation of the external carotid or common carotid artery and thus result in partial restoration of perfusion after transient MCAO. Since incomplete reperfusion may influence recovery and thus confound studies of the impact of neuroprotective compounds and therapies on outcomes after stroke, we have devised a novel method to induce transient MCAO with complete reperfusion. Advantages of the method include: MCAO is achieved through insertion of an intraluminal suture into the internal carotid artery through the common carotid artery.At the end of the occlusion period, the suture is withdrawn and the incision in the common carotid artery is closed with cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive and complete reperfusion is established.No residual subcutaneous sutures remain during recovery.Vasculature is restored to the preoperative state.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus