Limits...
Teaching and evaluating multitasking ability in emergency medicine residents - what is the best practice?

Heng KW - Int J Emerg Med (2014)

Bottom Line: This article reviewed the literature on multitasking in EM to identify best practices for teaching and evaluating multitasking amongst EM residents.This can be taught through a formal curriculum, role modeling by faculty, and simulation training.EM residents should be deployed in work environments commiserate with their multitasking ability and their progress should be graduated after identified deficiencies are remediated.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Emergency Department, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, 11 Jalan Tan Tock Seng 308433, Singapore.

ABSTRACT
Multitasking is an essential skill to develop during Emergency Medicine (EM) residency. Residents who struggle to cope in a multitasking environment risk fatigue, stress, and burnout. Improper management of interruption has been causally linked with medical errors. Formal teaching and evaluation of multitasking is often lacking in EM residency programs. This article reviewed the literature on multitasking in EM to identify best practices for teaching and evaluating multitasking amongst EM residents. With the advancement in understanding of what multitasking is, deliberate attempts should be made to teach residents pitfalls and coping strategies. This can be taught through a formal curriculum, role modeling by faculty, and simulation training. The best way to evaluate multitasking ability in residents is by direct observation. The EM Milestone Project provides a framework by which multitasking can be evaluated. EM residents should be deployed in work environments commiserate with their multitasking ability and their progress should be graduated after identified deficiencies are remediated.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Screen snapshot of an emergency medicine record system. Visual cues on an EMR system highlight unreviewed investigation results (P, point of care; X, X-ray; E, EKG; in red), patient location, and patients awaiting disposition.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4306081&req=5

Figure 1: Screen snapshot of an emergency medicine record system. Visual cues on an EMR system highlight unreviewed investigation results (P, point of care; X, X-ray; E, EKG; in red), patient location, and patients awaiting disposition.

Mentions: Residents should be taught interruption-handling strategies like when to ignore the interruption or how to suspend a primary task in a state that makes it easy to return to and how to resume a previously interrupted task [25],[26]. They should be explicitly taught recall techniques (e.g., visual cues, making a short note, involving nursing staff as a backup reminder). Where possible, technological solutions should be employed to aid physicians in recall and decision-making [27]. Figure 1 shows a screenshot of the electronic EM record system, EDWeb®, which provides visual cues on outstanding tasks. The goal is for residents to know when to avoid certain interruptions which would be detrimental to their work processes, while maintaining situational awareness and keeping an open eye or ear to know when switching tasks is appropriate to prioritize another patient over the current one. These skills are critical to the successful management of multiple patients.


Teaching and evaluating multitasking ability in emergency medicine residents - what is the best practice?

Heng KW - Int J Emerg Med (2014)

Screen snapshot of an emergency medicine record system. Visual cues on an EMR system highlight unreviewed investigation results (P, point of care; X, X-ray; E, EKG; in red), patient location, and patients awaiting disposition.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4306081&req=5

Figure 1: Screen snapshot of an emergency medicine record system. Visual cues on an EMR system highlight unreviewed investigation results (P, point of care; X, X-ray; E, EKG; in red), patient location, and patients awaiting disposition.
Mentions: Residents should be taught interruption-handling strategies like when to ignore the interruption or how to suspend a primary task in a state that makes it easy to return to and how to resume a previously interrupted task [25],[26]. They should be explicitly taught recall techniques (e.g., visual cues, making a short note, involving nursing staff as a backup reminder). Where possible, technological solutions should be employed to aid physicians in recall and decision-making [27]. Figure 1 shows a screenshot of the electronic EM record system, EDWeb®, which provides visual cues on outstanding tasks. The goal is for residents to know when to avoid certain interruptions which would be detrimental to their work processes, while maintaining situational awareness and keeping an open eye or ear to know when switching tasks is appropriate to prioritize another patient over the current one. These skills are critical to the successful management of multiple patients.

Bottom Line: This article reviewed the literature on multitasking in EM to identify best practices for teaching and evaluating multitasking amongst EM residents.This can be taught through a formal curriculum, role modeling by faculty, and simulation training.EM residents should be deployed in work environments commiserate with their multitasking ability and their progress should be graduated after identified deficiencies are remediated.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Emergency Department, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, 11 Jalan Tan Tock Seng 308433, Singapore.

ABSTRACT
Multitasking is an essential skill to develop during Emergency Medicine (EM) residency. Residents who struggle to cope in a multitasking environment risk fatigue, stress, and burnout. Improper management of interruption has been causally linked with medical errors. Formal teaching and evaluation of multitasking is often lacking in EM residency programs. This article reviewed the literature on multitasking in EM to identify best practices for teaching and evaluating multitasking amongst EM residents. With the advancement in understanding of what multitasking is, deliberate attempts should be made to teach residents pitfalls and coping strategies. This can be taught through a formal curriculum, role modeling by faculty, and simulation training. The best way to evaluate multitasking ability in residents is by direct observation. The EM Milestone Project provides a framework by which multitasking can be evaluated. EM residents should be deployed in work environments commiserate with their multitasking ability and their progress should be graduated after identified deficiencies are remediated.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus