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Does repeat Hb measurement within 2 hours after a normal initial Hb in stable trauma patients add value to trauma evaluation?

Sierink JC, Joosse P, de Castro SM, Schep NW, Goslings JC - Int J Emerg Med (2014)

Bottom Line: A total of 1,537 patients were included in the study, 1,246 of which did not present with signs of haemodynamic instability.A normal i-Hb was found in 914 patients (73%).Of the 914 patients with a normal i-Hb, 639 (70%) had a normal r-Hb, while in 127 patients (14%), an abnormal r-Hb was found.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Trauma Unit, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, Amsterdam AZ 1105, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Background: In our level I trauma center, it is considered common practice to repeat blood haemoglobin measurements in patients within 2 h after admission. However, the rationale behind this procedure is elusive and can be considered labour-intensive, especially in patients in whom haemorrhaging is not to be expected. The aim of this study was to assess the value of the repeated Hb measurement (r-Hb) within 2 h in adult trauma patients without evidence of haemodynamic instability.

Methods: The local trauma registry was used to identify all trauma patients without evidence of haemodynamic instability from January 2009 to December 2010. Patients in whom no initial blood Hb measurement (i-Hb) was done on admission, referrals, and patients without risk for traumatic injuries or haemorrhage based upon mechanism of injury (e.g. inhalation or drowning injury) were excluded.

Results: A total of 1,537 patients were included in the study, 1,246 of which did not present with signs of haemodynamic instability. Median Injury Severity Score (ISS) was 5 (interquartile range (IQR) 1 to 13), 22% of the patients were multitrauma patients (ISS > 15). A normal i-Hb was found in 914 patients (73%). Of the 914 patients with a normal i-Hb, 639 (70%) had a normal r-Hb, while in 127 patients (14%), an abnormal r-Hb was found. In none of these patients, the abnormal r-Hb led to new diagnoses. In 148 patients (16%), no repeated Hb measurement was done without clinical consequences.

Conclusion: We conclude that repeated blood Hb measurement within 2 h after admission in stable, adult trauma patients with a normal initial Hb concentration does not add value to a trauma patient's evaluation.

No MeSH data available.


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Flowchart of repeat Hb measurement within 2 h in trauma patients without evidence of haemodynamic instability.
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Figure 1: Flowchart of repeat Hb measurement within 2 h in trauma patients without evidence of haemodynamic instability.

Mentions: A flowchart of the r-Hb measurements in the remaining 1,246 trauma patients is shown in Figure 1. Hundred twenty nine of the patients underwent total-body CT scanning (10%). Nine hundred and fourteen (74%) patients had a normal i-Hb level. Repeated blood Hb measurement in patients with a normal i-Hb was performed in 766 patients (84%). In 582 patients (76%), this measurement was performed within the hour, and in 184 (24%) patients, it was performed within 1 to 2 h after admission to the trauma room. There was no significant difference in abnormal r-Hb measurements for patients whose Hb was measured within 2 h and between 1 to 2 h (P = 0.140).


Does repeat Hb measurement within 2 hours after a normal initial Hb in stable trauma patients add value to trauma evaluation?

Sierink JC, Joosse P, de Castro SM, Schep NW, Goslings JC - Int J Emerg Med (2014)

Flowchart of repeat Hb measurement within 2 h in trauma patients without evidence of haemodynamic instability.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4306047&req=5

Figure 1: Flowchart of repeat Hb measurement within 2 h in trauma patients without evidence of haemodynamic instability.
Mentions: A flowchart of the r-Hb measurements in the remaining 1,246 trauma patients is shown in Figure 1. Hundred twenty nine of the patients underwent total-body CT scanning (10%). Nine hundred and fourteen (74%) patients had a normal i-Hb level. Repeated blood Hb measurement in patients with a normal i-Hb was performed in 766 patients (84%). In 582 patients (76%), this measurement was performed within the hour, and in 184 (24%) patients, it was performed within 1 to 2 h after admission to the trauma room. There was no significant difference in abnormal r-Hb measurements for patients whose Hb was measured within 2 h and between 1 to 2 h (P = 0.140).

Bottom Line: A total of 1,537 patients were included in the study, 1,246 of which did not present with signs of haemodynamic instability.A normal i-Hb was found in 914 patients (73%).Of the 914 patients with a normal i-Hb, 639 (70%) had a normal r-Hb, while in 127 patients (14%), an abnormal r-Hb was found.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Trauma Unit, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, Amsterdam AZ 1105, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Background: In our level I trauma center, it is considered common practice to repeat blood haemoglobin measurements in patients within 2 h after admission. However, the rationale behind this procedure is elusive and can be considered labour-intensive, especially in patients in whom haemorrhaging is not to be expected. The aim of this study was to assess the value of the repeated Hb measurement (r-Hb) within 2 h in adult trauma patients without evidence of haemodynamic instability.

Methods: The local trauma registry was used to identify all trauma patients without evidence of haemodynamic instability from January 2009 to December 2010. Patients in whom no initial blood Hb measurement (i-Hb) was done on admission, referrals, and patients without risk for traumatic injuries or haemorrhage based upon mechanism of injury (e.g. inhalation or drowning injury) were excluded.

Results: A total of 1,537 patients were included in the study, 1,246 of which did not present with signs of haemodynamic instability. Median Injury Severity Score (ISS) was 5 (interquartile range (IQR) 1 to 13), 22% of the patients were multitrauma patients (ISS > 15). A normal i-Hb was found in 914 patients (73%). Of the 914 patients with a normal i-Hb, 639 (70%) had a normal r-Hb, while in 127 patients (14%), an abnormal r-Hb was found. In none of these patients, the abnormal r-Hb led to new diagnoses. In 148 patients (16%), no repeated Hb measurement was done without clinical consequences.

Conclusion: We conclude that repeated blood Hb measurement within 2 h after admission in stable, adult trauma patients with a normal initial Hb concentration does not add value to a trauma patient's evaluation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus