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Leotia cf. lubrica forms arbutoid mycorrhiza with Comarostaphylis arbutoides (Ericaceae).

Kühdorf K, Münzenberger B, Begerow D, Gómez-Laurito J, Hüttl RF - Mycorrhiza (2014)

Bottom Line: The morphotype was described morphologically and anatomically.Leotia cf. lubrica was identified using molecular methods, such as sequencing the internal-transcribed spacer (ITS) and the large subunit (LSU) ribosomal DNA regions, as well as phylogenetic analyses.Specific plant primers were used to confirm C. arbutoides as the host plant of the leotioid mycorrhiza.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF), Institute of Landscape Biogeochemistry, Eberswalder Straße 84, 15374, Müncheberg, Germany, katja.kuehdorf@zalf.de.

ABSTRACT
Arbutoid mycorrhizal plants are commonly found as understory vegetation in forests worldwide where ectomycorrhiza-forming trees occur. Comarostaphylis arbutoides (Ericaceae) is a tropical woody plant and common in tropical Central America. This plant forms arbutoid mycorrhiza, whereas only associations with Leccinum monticola as well as Sebacina sp. are described so far. We collected arbutoid mycorrhizas of C. arbutoides from the Cerro de la Muerte (Cordillera de Talamanca), Costa Rica, where this plant species grows together with Quercus costaricensis. We provide here the first evidence of mycorrhizal status for the Ascomycete Leotia cf. lubrica (Helotiales) that was so far under discussion as saprophyte or mycorrhizal. This fungus formed arbutoid mycorrhiza with C. arbutoides. The morphotype was described morphologically and anatomically. Leotia cf. lubrica was identified using molecular methods, such as sequencing the internal-transcribed spacer (ITS) and the large subunit (LSU) ribosomal DNA regions, as well as phylogenetic analyses. Specific plant primers were used to confirm C. arbutoides as the host plant of the leotioid mycorrhiza.

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a–d Interference contrast of the three mantle layers of leotioid mycorrhiza; bars, 20 μm: a outer mantle layer, hyphae containing numerous oily droplets (arrowheads). b Middle mantle layer. c Inner mantle layer. d Inner mantle layer close to very tip with brownish matrix (remnants of root cap cells). e–f Semi-thin sections of the arbutoid mycorrhiza Leotia cf. lubrica-Comarostaphylis arbutoides; bars, 50 μm: e hyphal mantle (HM), Hartig net (HN), intracellular hyphae (iH), and central cylinder (CC). f Anatomical features in detail
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Fig3: a–d Interference contrast of the three mantle layers of leotioid mycorrhiza; bars, 20 μm: a outer mantle layer, hyphae containing numerous oily droplets (arrowheads). b Middle mantle layer. c Inner mantle layer. d Inner mantle layer close to very tip with brownish matrix (remnants of root cap cells). e–f Semi-thin sections of the arbutoid mycorrhiza Leotia cf. lubrica-Comarostaphylis arbutoides; bars, 50 μm: e hyphal mantle (HM), Hartig net (HN), intracellular hyphae (iH), and central cylinder (CC). f Anatomical features in detail

Mentions: (Figs. 2 and 3a–d) Mantle plectenchymatous throughout, all hyphae clampless and smooth; laticifers are lacking. Outer mantle layers (Figs. 2a and 3a) hyphae arranged net-like; hyphae frequently branched, often with merged hyphal tips, matrix lacking (mantle type E; Agerer 1991); hyphae septate, even and straight, not constricted at septa; hyphae with closed anastomoses, anastomosal bridge long, mostly thinner than hyphae; hyphae with numerous oily droplets, droplets light yellow to light orange; cytoplasm colorless; hyphae 10–90 μm long, 0.7–3.1 μm diameter; cell walls 0.2–0.4 μm thick; septa as thick as cell walls and often difficult to discern due to frequent droplets. Middle mantle layers (Figs. 2d, e and 3b) contain a nongelatinous matrix, hyphae irregularly interwoven, repeatedly branched and septate, colorless, no discernible pattern; frequently merged hyphal tips, hyphae at distal end simple; hyphae 15–50 (90) μm long, 0.9–2.4 μm diameter; cell walls 0.2 μm thick; septa as thick as cell walls; anastomoses frequently and very variable in shape; anastomoses open or closed by a simple septum; anastomosal bridge long, short, or almost lacking; bridge thinner or thicker than hyphae or as thick as hyphae; cell walls of anastomoses as thick as remaining wall; anastomoses close to hyphal tips not found. Inner mantle layers (Figs. 2f, h and 3c) ring-like arrangement of hyphal bundles; hyphae even or irregularly inflated, at distal end simple or slightly inflated; hyphae rarely septate, colorless; hyphae (7) 20–130 μm long, 1.5–3.9 μm diameter; cell walls 0.2–0.3 μm thick, septa as thick as cell walls; anastomoses frequently, anastomoses open, with short bridge or bridge almost lacking, bridge thinner or thicker than hyphae, or as thick as hyphae; cell walls of anastomoses as thick as remaining walls; anastomoses close to hyphal tips also present. Very tip (Figs. 2g, h and 3d) inner mantle layers similar to remaining part but without hyphal bundles; hyphae often irregularly inflated, many hyphae with hyphal tips; outer and middle mantle layers organized as older parts of the mantle.Fig. 2


Leotia cf. lubrica forms arbutoid mycorrhiza with Comarostaphylis arbutoides (Ericaceae).

Kühdorf K, Münzenberger B, Begerow D, Gómez-Laurito J, Hüttl RF - Mycorrhiza (2014)

a–d Interference contrast of the three mantle layers of leotioid mycorrhiza; bars, 20 μm: a outer mantle layer, hyphae containing numerous oily droplets (arrowheads). b Middle mantle layer. c Inner mantle layer. d Inner mantle layer close to very tip with brownish matrix (remnants of root cap cells). e–f Semi-thin sections of the arbutoid mycorrhiza Leotia cf. lubrica-Comarostaphylis arbutoides; bars, 50 μm: e hyphal mantle (HM), Hartig net (HN), intracellular hyphae (iH), and central cylinder (CC). f Anatomical features in detail
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Fig3: a–d Interference contrast of the three mantle layers of leotioid mycorrhiza; bars, 20 μm: a outer mantle layer, hyphae containing numerous oily droplets (arrowheads). b Middle mantle layer. c Inner mantle layer. d Inner mantle layer close to very tip with brownish matrix (remnants of root cap cells). e–f Semi-thin sections of the arbutoid mycorrhiza Leotia cf. lubrica-Comarostaphylis arbutoides; bars, 50 μm: e hyphal mantle (HM), Hartig net (HN), intracellular hyphae (iH), and central cylinder (CC). f Anatomical features in detail
Mentions: (Figs. 2 and 3a–d) Mantle plectenchymatous throughout, all hyphae clampless and smooth; laticifers are lacking. Outer mantle layers (Figs. 2a and 3a) hyphae arranged net-like; hyphae frequently branched, often with merged hyphal tips, matrix lacking (mantle type E; Agerer 1991); hyphae septate, even and straight, not constricted at septa; hyphae with closed anastomoses, anastomosal bridge long, mostly thinner than hyphae; hyphae with numerous oily droplets, droplets light yellow to light orange; cytoplasm colorless; hyphae 10–90 μm long, 0.7–3.1 μm diameter; cell walls 0.2–0.4 μm thick; septa as thick as cell walls and often difficult to discern due to frequent droplets. Middle mantle layers (Figs. 2d, e and 3b) contain a nongelatinous matrix, hyphae irregularly interwoven, repeatedly branched and septate, colorless, no discernible pattern; frequently merged hyphal tips, hyphae at distal end simple; hyphae 15–50 (90) μm long, 0.9–2.4 μm diameter; cell walls 0.2 μm thick; septa as thick as cell walls; anastomoses frequently and very variable in shape; anastomoses open or closed by a simple septum; anastomosal bridge long, short, or almost lacking; bridge thinner or thicker than hyphae or as thick as hyphae; cell walls of anastomoses as thick as remaining wall; anastomoses close to hyphal tips not found. Inner mantle layers (Figs. 2f, h and 3c) ring-like arrangement of hyphal bundles; hyphae even or irregularly inflated, at distal end simple or slightly inflated; hyphae rarely septate, colorless; hyphae (7) 20–130 μm long, 1.5–3.9 μm diameter; cell walls 0.2–0.3 μm thick, septa as thick as cell walls; anastomoses frequently, anastomoses open, with short bridge or bridge almost lacking, bridge thinner or thicker than hyphae, or as thick as hyphae; cell walls of anastomoses as thick as remaining walls; anastomoses close to hyphal tips also present. Very tip (Figs. 2g, h and 3d) inner mantle layers similar to remaining part but without hyphal bundles; hyphae often irregularly inflated, many hyphae with hyphal tips; outer and middle mantle layers organized as older parts of the mantle.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: The morphotype was described morphologically and anatomically.Leotia cf. lubrica was identified using molecular methods, such as sequencing the internal-transcribed spacer (ITS) and the large subunit (LSU) ribosomal DNA regions, as well as phylogenetic analyses.Specific plant primers were used to confirm C. arbutoides as the host plant of the leotioid mycorrhiza.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF), Institute of Landscape Biogeochemistry, Eberswalder Straße 84, 15374, Müncheberg, Germany, katja.kuehdorf@zalf.de.

ABSTRACT
Arbutoid mycorrhizal plants are commonly found as understory vegetation in forests worldwide where ectomycorrhiza-forming trees occur. Comarostaphylis arbutoides (Ericaceae) is a tropical woody plant and common in tropical Central America. This plant forms arbutoid mycorrhiza, whereas only associations with Leccinum monticola as well as Sebacina sp. are described so far. We collected arbutoid mycorrhizas of C. arbutoides from the Cerro de la Muerte (Cordillera de Talamanca), Costa Rica, where this plant species grows together with Quercus costaricensis. We provide here the first evidence of mycorrhizal status for the Ascomycete Leotia cf. lubrica (Helotiales) that was so far under discussion as saprophyte or mycorrhizal. This fungus formed arbutoid mycorrhiza with C. arbutoides. The morphotype was described morphologically and anatomically. Leotia cf. lubrica was identified using molecular methods, such as sequencing the internal-transcribed spacer (ITS) and the large subunit (LSU) ribosomal DNA regions, as well as phylogenetic analyses. Specific plant primers were used to confirm C. arbutoides as the host plant of the leotioid mycorrhiza.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus