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Improved inflammatory balance of human skeletal muscle during exercise after supplementations of the ginseng-based steroid Rg1.

Hou CW, Lee SD, Kao CL, Cheng IS, Lin YN, Chuang SJ, Chen CY, Ivy JL, Huang CY, Kuo CH - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of ginseng-based steroid Rg1 on TNF-alpha and IL-10 gene expression in human skeletal muscle against exercise challenge, as well as on its ergogenic outcomes.However, cycling time to exhaustion at 80% VO2max increased significantly by ~20% (P<0.05).Our result suggests that Rg1 is an ergogenic component of ginseng, which can minimize unwanted lipid peroxidation of exercised human skeletal muscle, and attenuate pro-inflammatory shift under exercise challenge.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Exercise Biochemistry, Department of Sports Sciences, University of Taipei, Taipei, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Unlabelled: The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of ginseng-based steroid Rg1 on TNF-alpha and IL-10 gene expression in human skeletal muscle against exercise challenge, as well as on its ergogenic outcomes. Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover trials were performed, separated by a 4-week washout. Healthy young men were randomized into two groups and received capsule containing either 5 mg of Rg1 or Placebo one night and one hour before exercise. Muscle biopsies were conducted at baseline, immediately and 3 h after a standardized 60-min cycle ergometer exercise. While treatment differences in glycogen depletion rate of biopsied quadriceps muscle during exercise did not reach statistical significance, Rg1 supplementations enhanced post-exercise glycogen replenishment and increased citrate synthase activity in the skeletal muscle 3 h after exercise, concurrent with improved meal tolerance during recovery (P<0.05). Rg1 suppressed the exercise-induced increases in thiobarbituric acids reactive substance (TBARS) and reversed the increased TNF-alpha and decreased IL-10 mRNA of quadriceps muscle against the exercise challenge. PGC-1 alpha and GLUT4 mRNAs of exercised muscle were not affected by Rg1. Maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max) was not changed by Rg1. However, cycling time to exhaustion at 80% VO2max increased significantly by ~20% (P<0.05).

Conclusion: Our result suggests that Rg1 is an ergogenic component of ginseng, which can minimize unwanted lipid peroxidation of exercised human skeletal muscle, and attenuate pro-inflammatory shift under exercise challenge.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Oral Rg1 supplementations reverses pro-inflammatory shift in balance of exercised human skeletal muscle.Quantitative PCR data of mRNAs for TNF-α (A), IL-10 (B), and IL-6 (C) in vastus lateralis muscle.
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pone.0116387.g005: Oral Rg1 supplementations reverses pro-inflammatory shift in balance of exercised human skeletal muscle.Quantitative PCR data of mRNAs for TNF-α (A), IL-10 (B), and IL-6 (C) in vastus lateralis muscle.

Mentions: Trial 3 evaluated the mitochondria enzyme adaptation (Fig. 3), lipid peroxidation (Fig. 4), and inflammatory potentiation (Fig. 5) of exercised skeletal muscle during recovery. Results from the biopsied muscle samples reveal that Rg1 supplementations induced a significant increase in citrate synthase (CS) activity within only 3 h following exercise at 70% VO2max, whereas this increase was not detected for the Placebo trial. The lipid peroxidation marker TBARS in exercised human muscle increased significantly during the Placebo trial. However, this increase was eliminated completely during the Rg1 trial (Fig. 4). Exercise significantly lowered IL-10 mRNA levels by ~50% (Fig. 5A) with increased TNF-α mRNA (Fig. 5B). This pro-inflammatory shift in balance induced by exercise was reversed by pre-workout Rg1 supplementations. A delayed increase in IL-6 mRNA was found 3 h after exercise (Fig. 5C, P< 0.05) without an observable difference between Rg1 and Placebo trials.


Improved inflammatory balance of human skeletal muscle during exercise after supplementations of the ginseng-based steroid Rg1.

Hou CW, Lee SD, Kao CL, Cheng IS, Lin YN, Chuang SJ, Chen CY, Ivy JL, Huang CY, Kuo CH - PLoS ONE (2015)

Oral Rg1 supplementations reverses pro-inflammatory shift in balance of exercised human skeletal muscle.Quantitative PCR data of mRNAs for TNF-α (A), IL-10 (B), and IL-6 (C) in vastus lateralis muscle.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4305310&req=5

pone.0116387.g005: Oral Rg1 supplementations reverses pro-inflammatory shift in balance of exercised human skeletal muscle.Quantitative PCR data of mRNAs for TNF-α (A), IL-10 (B), and IL-6 (C) in vastus lateralis muscle.
Mentions: Trial 3 evaluated the mitochondria enzyme adaptation (Fig. 3), lipid peroxidation (Fig. 4), and inflammatory potentiation (Fig. 5) of exercised skeletal muscle during recovery. Results from the biopsied muscle samples reveal that Rg1 supplementations induced a significant increase in citrate synthase (CS) activity within only 3 h following exercise at 70% VO2max, whereas this increase was not detected for the Placebo trial. The lipid peroxidation marker TBARS in exercised human muscle increased significantly during the Placebo trial. However, this increase was eliminated completely during the Rg1 trial (Fig. 4). Exercise significantly lowered IL-10 mRNA levels by ~50% (Fig. 5A) with increased TNF-α mRNA (Fig. 5B). This pro-inflammatory shift in balance induced by exercise was reversed by pre-workout Rg1 supplementations. A delayed increase in IL-6 mRNA was found 3 h after exercise (Fig. 5C, P< 0.05) without an observable difference between Rg1 and Placebo trials.

Bottom Line: The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of ginseng-based steroid Rg1 on TNF-alpha and IL-10 gene expression in human skeletal muscle against exercise challenge, as well as on its ergogenic outcomes.However, cycling time to exhaustion at 80% VO2max increased significantly by ~20% (P<0.05).Our result suggests that Rg1 is an ergogenic component of ginseng, which can minimize unwanted lipid peroxidation of exercised human skeletal muscle, and attenuate pro-inflammatory shift under exercise challenge.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Exercise Biochemistry, Department of Sports Sciences, University of Taipei, Taipei, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Unlabelled: The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of ginseng-based steroid Rg1 on TNF-alpha and IL-10 gene expression in human skeletal muscle against exercise challenge, as well as on its ergogenic outcomes. Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover trials were performed, separated by a 4-week washout. Healthy young men were randomized into two groups and received capsule containing either 5 mg of Rg1 or Placebo one night and one hour before exercise. Muscle biopsies were conducted at baseline, immediately and 3 h after a standardized 60-min cycle ergometer exercise. While treatment differences in glycogen depletion rate of biopsied quadriceps muscle during exercise did not reach statistical significance, Rg1 supplementations enhanced post-exercise glycogen replenishment and increased citrate synthase activity in the skeletal muscle 3 h after exercise, concurrent with improved meal tolerance during recovery (P<0.05). Rg1 suppressed the exercise-induced increases in thiobarbituric acids reactive substance (TBARS) and reversed the increased TNF-alpha and decreased IL-10 mRNA of quadriceps muscle against the exercise challenge. PGC-1 alpha and GLUT4 mRNAs of exercised muscle were not affected by Rg1. Maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max) was not changed by Rg1. However, cycling time to exhaustion at 80% VO2max increased significantly by ~20% (P<0.05).

Conclusion: Our result suggests that Rg1 is an ergogenic component of ginseng, which can minimize unwanted lipid peroxidation of exercised human skeletal muscle, and attenuate pro-inflammatory shift under exercise challenge.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus