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A new modified Tsuge suture for flexor tendon repairs: the biomechanical analysis and clinical application.

Chen J, Wang K, Katirai F, Chen Z - J Orthop Surg Res (2014)

Bottom Line: The biomechanical analysis relied on 50 flexor digitorum profundus tendons harvested from fresh cadavers.The tendons were randomly divided into five groups, transected, and repaired by use of a 1. double-loop suture, 2. double modified locking Kessler, 3. four-strand Savage, 4. modified six-strand Savage, and 5. the new technique.The new modified Tsuge sutures described here have evident higher tensile and breaking forces compared to other four-strand core suture techniques, suggesting, in turn, that this new technique is a good alternative for flexor tendon repairs in clinical applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department Hand Surgery, Wuhan Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science & Technology, Jiefang Ave. 1277, Wuhan, Hubei, 430022, People's Republic of China. chenjianghai2002@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This study is to develop a new suturing technique for flexor tendon repair by modifying the extant Tsuge repair techniques and to use biomechanical analysis to compare the new method with four established repair techniques and evaluate its clinical efficacy in the repair of 47 flexor tendons in 22 patients.

Methods: The biomechanical analysis relied on 50 flexor digitorum profundus tendons harvested from fresh cadavers. The tendons were randomly divided into five groups, transected, and repaired by use of a 1. double-loop suture, 2. double modified locking Kessler, 3. four-strand Savage, 4. modified six-strand Savage, and 5. the new technique. The tensile force and breaking force of all repaired tendons were measured by static loading trials. For clinical application, 22 patients with acute flexor tendon injuries were treated with the new modified Tsuge suture and follow-up for more than 12 months.

Results: While differences in the tensile force and breaking force in the modified Tsuge sutures and modified six-strand Savage sutures were not statistically significant, static loading trials showed the tensile force, in the form of a 2-mm gap formation, and the breaking force of the new modified Tsuge sutures were, statistically, both higher than the ones characteristic of double-loop sutures, double modified locking Kessler, and four-strand Savage sutures. After 12 months, restored functions were observed in all the patients during the postoperative 12 months. Total active motion (TAM) score demonstrated that more than 90% fingers were estimated as excellent or good.

Conclusion: The new modified Tsuge sutures described here have evident higher tensile and breaking forces compared to other four-strand core suture techniques, suggesting, in turn, that this new technique is a good alternative for flexor tendon repairs in clinical applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Ultimate breaking force. Ultimate breaking force was significantly increased in the new modified Tsuge suture compared with double-loop sutures, double modified locking Kessler, and four-strand Savage sutures (p < 0.05).
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Fig5: Ultimate breaking force. Ultimate breaking force was significantly increased in the new modified Tsuge suture compared with double-loop sutures, double modified locking Kessler, and four-strand Savage sutures (p < 0.05).

Mentions: On the other hand, the breaking force of the new modified Tsuge suture was 42 ± 5.2 N, while for the modified Savage, it was 45 ± 4.3 N. With similar patterns for tensile gap forces, the ultimate tensile force was significantly stronger in the new modified Tsuge sutures than in double-loop sutures (31.5 ± 3.1 N), double modified locking Kessler (31.8 ± 3.4 N), and four-strand Savage (32.7 ± 3.1 N) sutures (Figure 5).Figure 5


A new modified Tsuge suture for flexor tendon repairs: the biomechanical analysis and clinical application.

Chen J, Wang K, Katirai F, Chen Z - J Orthop Surg Res (2014)

Ultimate breaking force. Ultimate breaking force was significantly increased in the new modified Tsuge suture compared with double-loop sutures, double modified locking Kessler, and four-strand Savage sutures (p < 0.05).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4305253&req=5

Fig5: Ultimate breaking force. Ultimate breaking force was significantly increased in the new modified Tsuge suture compared with double-loop sutures, double modified locking Kessler, and four-strand Savage sutures (p < 0.05).
Mentions: On the other hand, the breaking force of the new modified Tsuge suture was 42 ± 5.2 N, while for the modified Savage, it was 45 ± 4.3 N. With similar patterns for tensile gap forces, the ultimate tensile force was significantly stronger in the new modified Tsuge sutures than in double-loop sutures (31.5 ± 3.1 N), double modified locking Kessler (31.8 ± 3.4 N), and four-strand Savage (32.7 ± 3.1 N) sutures (Figure 5).Figure 5

Bottom Line: The biomechanical analysis relied on 50 flexor digitorum profundus tendons harvested from fresh cadavers.The tendons were randomly divided into five groups, transected, and repaired by use of a 1. double-loop suture, 2. double modified locking Kessler, 3. four-strand Savage, 4. modified six-strand Savage, and 5. the new technique.The new modified Tsuge sutures described here have evident higher tensile and breaking forces compared to other four-strand core suture techniques, suggesting, in turn, that this new technique is a good alternative for flexor tendon repairs in clinical applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department Hand Surgery, Wuhan Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science & Technology, Jiefang Ave. 1277, Wuhan, Hubei, 430022, People's Republic of China. chenjianghai2002@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This study is to develop a new suturing technique for flexor tendon repair by modifying the extant Tsuge repair techniques and to use biomechanical analysis to compare the new method with four established repair techniques and evaluate its clinical efficacy in the repair of 47 flexor tendons in 22 patients.

Methods: The biomechanical analysis relied on 50 flexor digitorum profundus tendons harvested from fresh cadavers. The tendons were randomly divided into five groups, transected, and repaired by use of a 1. double-loop suture, 2. double modified locking Kessler, 3. four-strand Savage, 4. modified six-strand Savage, and 5. the new technique. The tensile force and breaking force of all repaired tendons were measured by static loading trials. For clinical application, 22 patients with acute flexor tendon injuries were treated with the new modified Tsuge suture and follow-up for more than 12 months.

Results: While differences in the tensile force and breaking force in the modified Tsuge sutures and modified six-strand Savage sutures were not statistically significant, static loading trials showed the tensile force, in the form of a 2-mm gap formation, and the breaking force of the new modified Tsuge sutures were, statistically, both higher than the ones characteristic of double-loop sutures, double modified locking Kessler, and four-strand Savage sutures. After 12 months, restored functions were observed in all the patients during the postoperative 12 months. Total active motion (TAM) score demonstrated that more than 90% fingers were estimated as excellent or good.

Conclusion: The new modified Tsuge sutures described here have evident higher tensile and breaking forces compared to other four-strand core suture techniques, suggesting, in turn, that this new technique is a good alternative for flexor tendon repairs in clinical applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus