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Effect of grip type, wrist motion, and resistance level on pressures within the carpal tunnel of normal wrists.

McGorry RW, Fallentin N, Andersen JH, Keir PJ, Hansen TB, Pransky G, Lin JH - J. Orthop. Res. (2014)

Bottom Line: This study systematically evaluated the effect of wrist motion resistance and grip type on CTP during wrist motion typical of occupational tasks.CTP typically did not increase during wrist flexion, and in fact often decreased.Results could help inform design or modification of wrist motion intensive occupational tasks. © 2014 The Authors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety, 71 Frankland Road, Hopkinton, Massachusetts, 01748.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Carpal tunnel pressure (y-axis) versus wrist angular displacement (x-axis), each graph with a family of curves of resistance levels. By rows: Pinch Power and No-grip applications. By column, wrist motion conditions, left to right: (CM1)—extension/radial deviation & flexion/ulnar deviation, (E/F)—extension & flexion, (CM2)—extension/ulnar deviation & flexion/radial deviation, (R/U)—radial deviation & ulnar deviation. Sold-filled symbols indicate values significantly different from the neutral no-load condition.
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fig04: Carpal tunnel pressure (y-axis) versus wrist angular displacement (x-axis), each graph with a family of curves of resistance levels. By rows: Pinch Power and No-grip applications. By column, wrist motion conditions, left to right: (CM1)—extension/radial deviation & flexion/ulnar deviation, (E/F)—extension & flexion, (CM2)—extension/ulnar deviation & flexion/radial deviation, (R/U)—radial deviation & ulnar deviation. Sold-filled symbols indicate values significantly different from the neutral no-load condition.

Mentions: Data for each motion segment was standardized, as described in Methods, to allow investigation of change in CTP across participants, and to allow for quantifying tunnel pressure change as a function of wrist angular displacement and resistance level from the neutral, no-load condition. The results of the analyses of standardized change in CTP by wrist angular displacement for each grip application are presented in Figure 4, with solid symbols indicating significantly different pressures from the neutral, no-load condition. Resistance levels are presented as a family of curves.


Effect of grip type, wrist motion, and resistance level on pressures within the carpal tunnel of normal wrists.

McGorry RW, Fallentin N, Andersen JH, Keir PJ, Hansen TB, Pransky G, Lin JH - J. Orthop. Res. (2014)

Carpal tunnel pressure (y-axis) versus wrist angular displacement (x-axis), each graph with a family of curves of resistance levels. By rows: Pinch Power and No-grip applications. By column, wrist motion conditions, left to right: (CM1)—extension/radial deviation & flexion/ulnar deviation, (E/F)—extension & flexion, (CM2)—extension/ulnar deviation & flexion/radial deviation, (R/U)—radial deviation & ulnar deviation. Sold-filled symbols indicate values significantly different from the neutral no-load condition.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4305197&req=5

fig04: Carpal tunnel pressure (y-axis) versus wrist angular displacement (x-axis), each graph with a family of curves of resistance levels. By rows: Pinch Power and No-grip applications. By column, wrist motion conditions, left to right: (CM1)—extension/radial deviation & flexion/ulnar deviation, (E/F)—extension & flexion, (CM2)—extension/ulnar deviation & flexion/radial deviation, (R/U)—radial deviation & ulnar deviation. Sold-filled symbols indicate values significantly different from the neutral no-load condition.
Mentions: Data for each motion segment was standardized, as described in Methods, to allow investigation of change in CTP across participants, and to allow for quantifying tunnel pressure change as a function of wrist angular displacement and resistance level from the neutral, no-load condition. The results of the analyses of standardized change in CTP by wrist angular displacement for each grip application are presented in Figure 4, with solid symbols indicating significantly different pressures from the neutral, no-load condition. Resistance levels are presented as a family of curves.

Bottom Line: This study systematically evaluated the effect of wrist motion resistance and grip type on CTP during wrist motion typical of occupational tasks.CTP typically did not increase during wrist flexion, and in fact often decreased.Results could help inform design or modification of wrist motion intensive occupational tasks. © 2014 The Authors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety, 71 Frankland Road, Hopkinton, Massachusetts, 01748.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus