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Telephone cognitive-behavioral therapy for adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder: a randomized controlled non-inferiority trial.

Turner CM, Mataix-Cols D, Lovell K, Krebs G, Lang K, Byford S, Heyman I - J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry (2014)

Bottom Line: At 12-month follow-up, there were no significant between-group differences on the CY-BOCS, but the confidence intervals exceeded the non-inferiority threshold.TCBT is an effective treatment and is not inferior to standard clinic-based CBT, at least in the midterm.This approach provides a means of making a specialized treatment more accessible to many adolescents with OCD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. Electronic address: cynthia.turner@uq.edu.au.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Ninety-five percent CI for the difference in Children’s Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS) between telephone cognitive-behavioral therapy (TCBT) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) conditions.
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fig2: Ninety-five percent CI for the difference in Children’s Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS) between telephone cognitive-behavioral therapy (TCBT) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) conditions.

Mentions: Figure 2 presents the 95% confidence interval for the CY-BOCS mean difference between CBT and TCBT groups, and Figure 3 presents the mean scores (with standard error) for both conditions across time. For all assessment points through to the 6-month follow-up, the difference between conditions was nonsignificant, and the 95% confidence interval lay below the 5-point difference margin, indicating that TCBT was not inferior to CBT. For the 12-month follow-up point, the 95% confidence interval included the margin of difference, and, based on the guidance provided by Piaggio et al.39 for the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) group, we conclude that the difference was nonsignificant; however, non-inferiority of TCBT could not conclusively be demonstrated at this time point.


Telephone cognitive-behavioral therapy for adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder: a randomized controlled non-inferiority trial.

Turner CM, Mataix-Cols D, Lovell K, Krebs G, Lang K, Byford S, Heyman I - J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry (2014)

Ninety-five percent CI for the difference in Children’s Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS) between telephone cognitive-behavioral therapy (TCBT) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) conditions.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4305192&req=5

fig2: Ninety-five percent CI for the difference in Children’s Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS) between telephone cognitive-behavioral therapy (TCBT) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) conditions.
Mentions: Figure 2 presents the 95% confidence interval for the CY-BOCS mean difference between CBT and TCBT groups, and Figure 3 presents the mean scores (with standard error) for both conditions across time. For all assessment points through to the 6-month follow-up, the difference between conditions was nonsignificant, and the 95% confidence interval lay below the 5-point difference margin, indicating that TCBT was not inferior to CBT. For the 12-month follow-up point, the 95% confidence interval included the margin of difference, and, based on the guidance provided by Piaggio et al.39 for the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) group, we conclude that the difference was nonsignificant; however, non-inferiority of TCBT could not conclusively be demonstrated at this time point.

Bottom Line: At 12-month follow-up, there were no significant between-group differences on the CY-BOCS, but the confidence intervals exceeded the non-inferiority threshold.TCBT is an effective treatment and is not inferior to standard clinic-based CBT, at least in the midterm.This approach provides a means of making a specialized treatment more accessible to many adolescents with OCD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. Electronic address: cynthia.turner@uq.edu.au.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus