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Mobile locally operated detachable end-effector manipulator for endoscopic surgery.

Kawai T, Shin M, Nishizawa Y, Horise Y, Nishikawa A, Nakamura T - Int J Comput Assist Radiol Surg (2014)

Bottom Line: Although many locally operated surgical robots and devices have been developed, none can safely grasp organs and provide traction.A mobile locally operated detachable end-effector manipulator (LODEM) was developed and tested.The manipulator could successfully handle the target organs with the required level of dexterity during an in vivo laparoscopic surgical procedure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Institute of Technology, 5-16-1 Omiya, Asahi Ward, Osaka , 535-8585, Japan, kawai@bme.oit.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Local surgery is safer than remote surgery because emergencies can be more easily addressed. Although many locally operated surgical robots and devices have been developed, none can safely grasp organs and provide traction. A new manipulator with a detachable commercial forceps was developed that can act as a third arm for a surgeon situated in a sterile area near the patient. This mechanism can be disassembled into compact parts that enable mobile use.

Methods: A mobile locally operated detachable end-effector manipulator (LODEM) was developed and tested. This device uses crank-slider and cable-rod mechanisms to achieve 5 degrees of freedom and an acting force of more than 5 N. The total mass is less than 15 kg. The positional accuracy and speed of the prototype device were evaluated while performing simulated in vivo surgery.

Results: The accuracy of the mobile LODEM was 0.4 mm, sufficient for handling organs. The manipulator could be assembled and disassembled in 8 min, making it highly mobile. The manipulator could successfully handle the target organs with the required level of dexterity during an in vivo laparoscopic surgical procedure.

Conclusions: A mobile LODEM was designed that allows minimally invasive robotically assisted endoscopic surgery by a surgeon working near the patient. This device is highly promising for robotic surgery applications.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

In vivo laparoscopic surgery: a grasping and pulling the gall bladder during cholecystectomy, b button controller attached to a handheld forceps, c horizontal position of manipulator in cholecystectomy, d grasping and pulling the colon during proctectomy
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Fig8: In vivo laparoscopic surgery: a grasping and pulling the gall bladder during cholecystectomy, b button controller attached to a handheld forceps, c horizontal position of manipulator in cholecystectomy, d grasping and pulling the colon during proctectomy

Mentions: Figure 8 shows photographs of the in vivo laparoscopic surgical procedure. In Fig. 8a, the manipulator position is being changed in order to grasp and pull the gall bladder so as to perform the cholecystectomy. The button controller is seen attached to the left-hand forceps in Fig. 8b. Figure 8c shows the manipulator at its maximum pitch angle, making it close to horizontal. Figure 8d shows the manipulator position being changed in order to grasp and pull the colon so as to perform a proctectomy. The forceps attached to the manipulator was made to stop in front of the target organ, grasp and pull it, after the surgeon transferred it to the forceps on the manipulator. The organs could be pulled in various directions using the forceps attached to the manipulator. The forceps held in the left hand could also be used to grasp and pull the organs, and the electric scalpel held in the right hand could be used to dissect the organ. Smooth dissection of the target organ was performed by the specialist. Successful laparoscopic surgery was performed with very little blood loss.


Mobile locally operated detachable end-effector manipulator for endoscopic surgery.

Kawai T, Shin M, Nishizawa Y, Horise Y, Nishikawa A, Nakamura T - Int J Comput Assist Radiol Surg (2014)

In vivo laparoscopic surgery: a grasping and pulling the gall bladder during cholecystectomy, b button controller attached to a handheld forceps, c horizontal position of manipulator in cholecystectomy, d grasping and pulling the colon during proctectomy
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4305102&req=5

Fig8: In vivo laparoscopic surgery: a grasping and pulling the gall bladder during cholecystectomy, b button controller attached to a handheld forceps, c horizontal position of manipulator in cholecystectomy, d grasping and pulling the colon during proctectomy
Mentions: Figure 8 shows photographs of the in vivo laparoscopic surgical procedure. In Fig. 8a, the manipulator position is being changed in order to grasp and pull the gall bladder so as to perform the cholecystectomy. The button controller is seen attached to the left-hand forceps in Fig. 8b. Figure 8c shows the manipulator at its maximum pitch angle, making it close to horizontal. Figure 8d shows the manipulator position being changed in order to grasp and pull the colon so as to perform a proctectomy. The forceps attached to the manipulator was made to stop in front of the target organ, grasp and pull it, after the surgeon transferred it to the forceps on the manipulator. The organs could be pulled in various directions using the forceps attached to the manipulator. The forceps held in the left hand could also be used to grasp and pull the organs, and the electric scalpel held in the right hand could be used to dissect the organ. Smooth dissection of the target organ was performed by the specialist. Successful laparoscopic surgery was performed with very little blood loss.

Bottom Line: Although many locally operated surgical robots and devices have been developed, none can safely grasp organs and provide traction.A mobile locally operated detachable end-effector manipulator (LODEM) was developed and tested.The manipulator could successfully handle the target organs with the required level of dexterity during an in vivo laparoscopic surgical procedure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Institute of Technology, 5-16-1 Omiya, Asahi Ward, Osaka , 535-8585, Japan, kawai@bme.oit.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Local surgery is safer than remote surgery because emergencies can be more easily addressed. Although many locally operated surgical robots and devices have been developed, none can safely grasp organs and provide traction. A new manipulator with a detachable commercial forceps was developed that can act as a third arm for a surgeon situated in a sterile area near the patient. This mechanism can be disassembled into compact parts that enable mobile use.

Methods: A mobile locally operated detachable end-effector manipulator (LODEM) was developed and tested. This device uses crank-slider and cable-rod mechanisms to achieve 5 degrees of freedom and an acting force of more than 5 N. The total mass is less than 15 kg. The positional accuracy and speed of the prototype device were evaluated while performing simulated in vivo surgery.

Results: The accuracy of the mobile LODEM was 0.4 mm, sufficient for handling organs. The manipulator could be assembled and disassembled in 8 min, making it highly mobile. The manipulator could successfully handle the target organs with the required level of dexterity during an in vivo laparoscopic surgical procedure.

Conclusions: A mobile LODEM was designed that allows minimally invasive robotically assisted endoscopic surgery by a surgeon working near the patient. This device is highly promising for robotic surgery applications.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus