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Occupational kneeling and squatting: development and validation of an assessment method combining measurements and diaries.

Ditchen DM, Ellegast RP, Gawliczek T, Hartmann B, Rieger MA - Int Arch Occup Environ Health (2014)

Bottom Line: The accuracy of the method was examined by comparing the results to measurements of entire work shifts.Unsupported kneeling was the most widely used knee posture in our sample (median 11.4 % per work shift), followed by supported kneeling (3.0 %), sitting on heels (1.1 %), squatting (0.7 %), and crawling (0.0 %).The daily time spent in knee-straining postures varied considerably, both between the individual occupations, within an occupation (e.g. parquet layers: 0.0-88.9 %), and to some extent even within a single task (e.g. preparation work of floor layers (22.0 ± 23.0 %).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Occupational Safety and Health of the German Social Accident Insurance, Alte Heerstr. 111, 53757, Sankt Augustin, Germany, dirk.ditchen@dguv.de.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: As knee-straining postures such as kneeling and squatting are known to be risk factors for knee disorders, there is a need for effective exposure assessment at the workplace. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a method to capture knee-straining postures for entire work shifts by combining measurement techniques with the information obtained from diaries, and thus avoiding measuring entire work shifts. This approach was applied to various occupational tasks to obtain an overview of typical exposure values in current specific occupations.

Methods: The analyses were carried out in the field using an ambulatory measuring system (CUELA) to assess posture combined with one-day self-reported occupational diaries describing the durations of various work tasks. In total, 242 work shifts were measured, representing 81 typical tasks from 16 professions. Knee-straining postures were analysed as daily time intervals for five different postures. The accuracy of the method was examined by comparing the results to measurements of entire work shifts.

Results: Unsupported kneeling was the most widely used knee posture in our sample (median 11.4 % per work shift), followed by supported kneeling (3.0 %), sitting on heels (1.1 %), squatting (0.7 %), and crawling (0.0 %). The daily time spent in knee-straining postures varied considerably, both between the individual occupations, within an occupation (e.g. parquet layers: 0.0-88.9 %), and to some extent even within a single task (e.g. preparation work of floor layers (22.0 ± 23.0 %). The applied measuring method for obtaining daily exposure to the knee has been proven valid and efficient randomly compared with whole-shift measurements (p = 0.27).

Conclusions: The daily degree of postural exposure to the knee showed a huge variation within the analysed job categories and seemed to be dependent on the particular tasks performed. The results of this study may help to develop an exposure matrix with respect to occupational knee-straining postures. The tested combination of task-based measurement and diary information may be a promising option for providing a cost-effective assessment tool.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of daily time intervals spent in five different knee-straining postures over all measurements (box-plots showing percentiles 5, 25, 50, 75, and 95; N = 242 work shifts)
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Fig4: Distribution of daily time intervals spent in five different knee-straining postures over all measurements (box-plots showing percentiles 5, 25, 50, 75, and 95; N = 242 work shifts)

Mentions: Figure 4 shows the distributions of daily time intervals of the analysed postures over all examined work shifts. According to these results, unsupported kneeling was the most widely used knee posture in our sample (median 11.4 %, e.g. 55 min in a typical work shift of 480 min), followed by supported kneeling (15 min/480 min shift), sitting on heels (5 min), squatting (3 min), and crawling (0 min). The total mean exposure to the knee (=100 %) consisted mainly of unsupported kneeling (51.3 %), followed by supported kneeling (25.1 %), squatting (12.8 %), sitting on heels (9.5 %), and crawling (1.2 %).Fig. 4


Occupational kneeling and squatting: development and validation of an assessment method combining measurements and diaries.

Ditchen DM, Ellegast RP, Gawliczek T, Hartmann B, Rieger MA - Int Arch Occup Environ Health (2014)

Distribution of daily time intervals spent in five different knee-straining postures over all measurements (box-plots showing percentiles 5, 25, 50, 75, and 95; N = 242 work shifts)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4305088&req=5

Fig4: Distribution of daily time intervals spent in five different knee-straining postures over all measurements (box-plots showing percentiles 5, 25, 50, 75, and 95; N = 242 work shifts)
Mentions: Figure 4 shows the distributions of daily time intervals of the analysed postures over all examined work shifts. According to these results, unsupported kneeling was the most widely used knee posture in our sample (median 11.4 %, e.g. 55 min in a typical work shift of 480 min), followed by supported kneeling (15 min/480 min shift), sitting on heels (5 min), squatting (3 min), and crawling (0 min). The total mean exposure to the knee (=100 %) consisted mainly of unsupported kneeling (51.3 %), followed by supported kneeling (25.1 %), squatting (12.8 %), sitting on heels (9.5 %), and crawling (1.2 %).Fig. 4

Bottom Line: The accuracy of the method was examined by comparing the results to measurements of entire work shifts.Unsupported kneeling was the most widely used knee posture in our sample (median 11.4 % per work shift), followed by supported kneeling (3.0 %), sitting on heels (1.1 %), squatting (0.7 %), and crawling (0.0 %).The daily time spent in knee-straining postures varied considerably, both between the individual occupations, within an occupation (e.g. parquet layers: 0.0-88.9 %), and to some extent even within a single task (e.g. preparation work of floor layers (22.0 ± 23.0 %).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Occupational Safety and Health of the German Social Accident Insurance, Alte Heerstr. 111, 53757, Sankt Augustin, Germany, dirk.ditchen@dguv.de.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: As knee-straining postures such as kneeling and squatting are known to be risk factors for knee disorders, there is a need for effective exposure assessment at the workplace. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a method to capture knee-straining postures for entire work shifts by combining measurement techniques with the information obtained from diaries, and thus avoiding measuring entire work shifts. This approach was applied to various occupational tasks to obtain an overview of typical exposure values in current specific occupations.

Methods: The analyses were carried out in the field using an ambulatory measuring system (CUELA) to assess posture combined with one-day self-reported occupational diaries describing the durations of various work tasks. In total, 242 work shifts were measured, representing 81 typical tasks from 16 professions. Knee-straining postures were analysed as daily time intervals for five different postures. The accuracy of the method was examined by comparing the results to measurements of entire work shifts.

Results: Unsupported kneeling was the most widely used knee posture in our sample (median 11.4 % per work shift), followed by supported kneeling (3.0 %), sitting on heels (1.1 %), squatting (0.7 %), and crawling (0.0 %). The daily time spent in knee-straining postures varied considerably, both between the individual occupations, within an occupation (e.g. parquet layers: 0.0-88.9 %), and to some extent even within a single task (e.g. preparation work of floor layers (22.0 ± 23.0 %). The applied measuring method for obtaining daily exposure to the knee has been proven valid and efficient randomly compared with whole-shift measurements (p = 0.27).

Conclusions: The daily degree of postural exposure to the knee showed a huge variation within the analysed job categories and seemed to be dependent on the particular tasks performed. The results of this study may help to develop an exposure matrix with respect to occupational knee-straining postures. The tested combination of task-based measurement and diary information may be a promising option for providing a cost-effective assessment tool.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus