Limits...
Consistency and standardization of color in medical imaging: a consensus report.

Badano A, Revie C, Casertano A, Cheng WC, Green P, Kimpe T, Krupinski E, Sisson C, Skrøvseth S, Treanor D, Boynton P, Clunie D, Flynn MJ, Heki T, Hewitt S, Homma H, Masia A, Matsui T, Nagy B, Nishibori M, Penczek J, Schopf T, Yagi Y, Yokoi H, Summit on Color in Medical Imagi - J Digit Imaging (2015)

Bottom Line: Participants were asked to identify areas of concern and unmet needs.This summary documents the topics that were discussed at the meeting and recommendations that were made by the participants.Key areas identified where improvements in color would provide immediate tangible benefits were those of digital microscopy, telemedicine, medical photography (particularly ophthalmic and dental photography), and display calibration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Imaging and Applied Mathematics, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10993 New Hampshire Ave., 20993, Silver Spring, USA, aldo.badano@fda.hhs.gov.

ABSTRACT
This article summarizes the consensus reached at the Summit on Color in Medical Imaging held at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on May 8-9, 2013, co-sponsored by the FDA and ICC (International Color Consortium). The purpose of the meeting was to gather information on how color is currently handled by medical imaging systems to identify areas where there is a need for improvement, to define objective requirements, and to facilitate consensus development of best practices. Participants were asked to identify areas of concern and unmet needs. This summary documents the topics that were discussed at the meeting and recommendations that were made by the participants. Key areas identified where improvements in color would provide immediate tangible benefits were those of digital microscopy, telemedicine, medical photography (particularly ophthalmic and dental photography), and display calibration. Work in these and other related areas has been started within several professional groups, including the creation of the ICC Medical Imaging Working Group.

Show MeSH
Observed color variation from RGB and six-band multispectral surgery image
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4305059&req=5

Fig7: Observed color variation from RGB and six-band multispectral surgery image

Mentions: Teledermatology (real-time and store-forward) shows why acquisition is important [25]. Providers send patient history and image data to a dermatologist who provides diagnostic and treatment recommendations, second opinions, monitoring, and/or e-learning, generally with a high degree of diagnostic accuracy (see Fig. 6). Conditions impacting color quality include lighting, camera settings (e.g., focus, flash, and white balance), compression, and views. Image rendering can improve quality, for example by using a spectrum-based reproduction system that produces high-fidelity color reproduction in different lighting environments. This type of system uses color or multispectral cameras (e.g., six-band video camera), devices for illumination spectrum measurements, calibrated color displays, and spectrum-based color conversion [26, 27]. Multispectral images from dermatology, surgery (see Fig. 7), and pathology have been rated by clinicians as achieving higher color reproducibility, better image fidelity, and superior appearance of material surface compared to conventional RGB-based images. Multispectral images also allow for quantitative color analyses that could improve diagnostic interpretations. For display, calibration and characterization protocols can be considered for high color accuracy. One pathology study [28] has revealed a slight advantage diagnostically for a properly calibrated and color-managed display and a significant advantage in terms of workflow.Fig. 6


Consistency and standardization of color in medical imaging: a consensus report.

Badano A, Revie C, Casertano A, Cheng WC, Green P, Kimpe T, Krupinski E, Sisson C, Skrøvseth S, Treanor D, Boynton P, Clunie D, Flynn MJ, Heki T, Hewitt S, Homma H, Masia A, Matsui T, Nagy B, Nishibori M, Penczek J, Schopf T, Yagi Y, Yokoi H, Summit on Color in Medical Imagi - J Digit Imaging (2015)

Observed color variation from RGB and six-band multispectral surgery image
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4305059&req=5

Fig7: Observed color variation from RGB and six-band multispectral surgery image
Mentions: Teledermatology (real-time and store-forward) shows why acquisition is important [25]. Providers send patient history and image data to a dermatologist who provides diagnostic and treatment recommendations, second opinions, monitoring, and/or e-learning, generally with a high degree of diagnostic accuracy (see Fig. 6). Conditions impacting color quality include lighting, camera settings (e.g., focus, flash, and white balance), compression, and views. Image rendering can improve quality, for example by using a spectrum-based reproduction system that produces high-fidelity color reproduction in different lighting environments. This type of system uses color or multispectral cameras (e.g., six-band video camera), devices for illumination spectrum measurements, calibrated color displays, and spectrum-based color conversion [26, 27]. Multispectral images from dermatology, surgery (see Fig. 7), and pathology have been rated by clinicians as achieving higher color reproducibility, better image fidelity, and superior appearance of material surface compared to conventional RGB-based images. Multispectral images also allow for quantitative color analyses that could improve diagnostic interpretations. For display, calibration and characterization protocols can be considered for high color accuracy. One pathology study [28] has revealed a slight advantage diagnostically for a properly calibrated and color-managed display and a significant advantage in terms of workflow.Fig. 6

Bottom Line: Participants were asked to identify areas of concern and unmet needs.This summary documents the topics that were discussed at the meeting and recommendations that were made by the participants.Key areas identified where improvements in color would provide immediate tangible benefits were those of digital microscopy, telemedicine, medical photography (particularly ophthalmic and dental photography), and display calibration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Imaging and Applied Mathematics, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10993 New Hampshire Ave., 20993, Silver Spring, USA, aldo.badano@fda.hhs.gov.

ABSTRACT
This article summarizes the consensus reached at the Summit on Color in Medical Imaging held at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on May 8-9, 2013, co-sponsored by the FDA and ICC (International Color Consortium). The purpose of the meeting was to gather information on how color is currently handled by medical imaging systems to identify areas where there is a need for improvement, to define objective requirements, and to facilitate consensus development of best practices. Participants were asked to identify areas of concern and unmet needs. This summary documents the topics that were discussed at the meeting and recommendations that were made by the participants. Key areas identified where improvements in color would provide immediate tangible benefits were those of digital microscopy, telemedicine, medical photography (particularly ophthalmic and dental photography), and display calibration. Work in these and other related areas has been started within several professional groups, including the creation of the ICC Medical Imaging Working Group.

Show MeSH