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Consistency and standardization of color in medical imaging: a consensus report.

Badano A, Revie C, Casertano A, Cheng WC, Green P, Kimpe T, Krupinski E, Sisson C, Skrøvseth S, Treanor D, Boynton P, Clunie D, Flynn MJ, Heki T, Hewitt S, Homma H, Masia A, Matsui T, Nagy B, Nishibori M, Penczek J, Schopf T, Yagi Y, Yokoi H, Summit on Color in Medical Imagi - J Digit Imaging (2015)

Bottom Line: Participants were asked to identify areas of concern and unmet needs.This summary documents the topics that were discussed at the meeting and recommendations that were made by the participants.Key areas identified where improvements in color would provide immediate tangible benefits were those of digital microscopy, telemedicine, medical photography (particularly ophthalmic and dental photography), and display calibration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Imaging and Applied Mathematics, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10993 New Hampshire Ave., 20993, Silver Spring, USA, aldo.badano@fda.hhs.gov.

ABSTRACT
This article summarizes the consensus reached at the Summit on Color in Medical Imaging held at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on May 8-9, 2013, co-sponsored by the FDA and ICC (International Color Consortium). The purpose of the meeting was to gather information on how color is currently handled by medical imaging systems to identify areas where there is a need for improvement, to define objective requirements, and to facilitate consensus development of best practices. Participants were asked to identify areas of concern and unmet needs. This summary documents the topics that were discussed at the meeting and recommendations that were made by the participants. Key areas identified where improvements in color would provide immediate tangible benefits were those of digital microscopy, telemedicine, medical photography (particularly ophthalmic and dental photography), and display calibration. Work in these and other related areas has been started within several professional groups, including the creation of the ICC Medical Imaging Working Group.

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Observed variation in color between scanners and software. a, b The same slide imaged with the same scanner, viewed using two different software packages (screenshots). c The same slide imaged on two different scanners with IHC (top) and H&E (bottom) stains. The color rendition of the scans appears noticeably different from scanner A to B
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Fig1: Observed variation in color between scanners and software. a, b The same slide imaged with the same scanner, viewed using two different software packages (screenshots). c The same slide imaged on two different scanners with IHC (top) and H&E (bottom) stains. The color rendition of the scans appears noticeably different from scanner A to B

Mentions: Although a variety of modalities in these disciplines utilize digital images including telepathology and digital microscopy, whole-slide imaging (WSI) is the modality most likely to drive the adoption of color standardization. Applications include research and clinical uses of pathology imaging for visual assessment, and (importantly) the automated assessment of images with image analysis software algorithms. Pathology samples are stained with a wide variety of colored dyes. With conventional light microscopy and human interpretation, variability in color is often not a critical issue, perhaps because in such a viewing environment, it is easy to adapt to differences and it is often easy to simply stain another piece of the tissue sample. The increasing use of digital pathology, however, highlights the color differences between samples, laboratories, and scanning and display systems (see Fig. 1). There are noticeable color differences in these situations, which are visible to the observer and affect the results of image analysis algorithms.Fig. 1


Consistency and standardization of color in medical imaging: a consensus report.

Badano A, Revie C, Casertano A, Cheng WC, Green P, Kimpe T, Krupinski E, Sisson C, Skrøvseth S, Treanor D, Boynton P, Clunie D, Flynn MJ, Heki T, Hewitt S, Homma H, Masia A, Matsui T, Nagy B, Nishibori M, Penczek J, Schopf T, Yagi Y, Yokoi H, Summit on Color in Medical Imagi - J Digit Imaging (2015)

Observed variation in color between scanners and software. a, b The same slide imaged with the same scanner, viewed using two different software packages (screenshots). c The same slide imaged on two different scanners with IHC (top) and H&E (bottom) stains. The color rendition of the scans appears noticeably different from scanner A to B
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4305059&req=5

Fig1: Observed variation in color between scanners and software. a, b The same slide imaged with the same scanner, viewed using two different software packages (screenshots). c The same slide imaged on two different scanners with IHC (top) and H&E (bottom) stains. The color rendition of the scans appears noticeably different from scanner A to B
Mentions: Although a variety of modalities in these disciplines utilize digital images including telepathology and digital microscopy, whole-slide imaging (WSI) is the modality most likely to drive the adoption of color standardization. Applications include research and clinical uses of pathology imaging for visual assessment, and (importantly) the automated assessment of images with image analysis software algorithms. Pathology samples are stained with a wide variety of colored dyes. With conventional light microscopy and human interpretation, variability in color is often not a critical issue, perhaps because in such a viewing environment, it is easy to adapt to differences and it is often easy to simply stain another piece of the tissue sample. The increasing use of digital pathology, however, highlights the color differences between samples, laboratories, and scanning and display systems (see Fig. 1). There are noticeable color differences in these situations, which are visible to the observer and affect the results of image analysis algorithms.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Participants were asked to identify areas of concern and unmet needs.This summary documents the topics that were discussed at the meeting and recommendations that were made by the participants.Key areas identified where improvements in color would provide immediate tangible benefits were those of digital microscopy, telemedicine, medical photography (particularly ophthalmic and dental photography), and display calibration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Imaging and Applied Mathematics, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10993 New Hampshire Ave., 20993, Silver Spring, USA, aldo.badano@fda.hhs.gov.

ABSTRACT
This article summarizes the consensus reached at the Summit on Color in Medical Imaging held at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on May 8-9, 2013, co-sponsored by the FDA and ICC (International Color Consortium). The purpose of the meeting was to gather information on how color is currently handled by medical imaging systems to identify areas where there is a need for improvement, to define objective requirements, and to facilitate consensus development of best practices. Participants were asked to identify areas of concern and unmet needs. This summary documents the topics that were discussed at the meeting and recommendations that were made by the participants. Key areas identified where improvements in color would provide immediate tangible benefits were those of digital microscopy, telemedicine, medical photography (particularly ophthalmic and dental photography), and display calibration. Work in these and other related areas has been started within several professional groups, including the creation of the ICC Medical Imaging Working Group.

Show MeSH