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Intensity-modulated pelvic radiation therapy and simultaneous integrated boost to the prostate area in patients with high-risk prostate cancer: a preliminary report of disease control.

Saracino B, Petrongari MG, Marzi S, Bruzzaniti V, Sara G, Arcangeli S, Arcangeli G, PinnarĂ² P, Giordano C, Ferraro AM, Strigari L - Cancer Med (2014)

Bottom Line: For the whole patient group, the 3- and 5-year freedom from biochemical failure were 82.6% and 74.6%, respectively, with a better outcome in patients treated with radical approach.The 3- and 5-year ≥G2 freedom from late rectal toxicity rate were 98% and 95%, respectively, while the 3- and 5-year ≥G2 freedom from late urinary toxicity rate were 95% and 88%, respectively.The study concludes that pelvic IMRT and SIB to the prostatic area in association with 2-year ADT was a well-tolerated technique, providing high disease control in patients with prostate cancer requiring LN treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiotherapy, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome, Italy.

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Actuarial analysis of the freedom from grade 2 late rectal toxicity for radical (RAD) versus postoperative irradiation (ART or SRT intent) (A). Actuarial analysis of the freedom from grade 2 late genitourinary (GU) toxicity for radical (RAD) versus postoperative irradiation (ART or SRT intent) (B). Actuarial analysis of the freedom from grade 2 late rectal toxicity for radical (RAD) versus postoperative irradiation (ART or SRT intent) in relation to the rectal volume receiving doses >70 Gy (C).
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fig01: Actuarial analysis of the freedom from grade 2 late rectal toxicity for radical (RAD) versus postoperative irradiation (ART or SRT intent) (A). Actuarial analysis of the freedom from grade 2 late genitourinary (GU) toxicity for radical (RAD) versus postoperative irradiation (ART or SRT intent) (B). Actuarial analysis of the freedom from grade 2 late rectal toxicity for radical (RAD) versus postoperative irradiation (ART or SRT intent) in relation to the rectal volume receiving doses >70 Gy (C).

Mentions: None of the patients experienced late G3 urinary or rectal toxicity. At 5 years, the actuarial rates of freedom from G2 rectal late toxicity were 90.4% and 96.6% for the RAD and ART/SRT groups, respectively (Fig.1A), while the 5-year freedom from G2 late urinary toxicity were 80.5% and 91.6%, respectively (Fig.1B). Late toxicity was not significantly affected by prostatic or pelvic irradiated volume, while a significant lower G2 rectal late toxicity was observed in patients when less than 20% rectum volume received doses higher than 70 Gy (Fig.1C, P = 0.013).


Intensity-modulated pelvic radiation therapy and simultaneous integrated boost to the prostate area in patients with high-risk prostate cancer: a preliminary report of disease control.

Saracino B, Petrongari MG, Marzi S, Bruzzaniti V, Sara G, Arcangeli S, Arcangeli G, PinnarĂ² P, Giordano C, Ferraro AM, Strigari L - Cancer Med (2014)

Actuarial analysis of the freedom from grade 2 late rectal toxicity for radical (RAD) versus postoperative irradiation (ART or SRT intent) (A). Actuarial analysis of the freedom from grade 2 late genitourinary (GU) toxicity for radical (RAD) versus postoperative irradiation (ART or SRT intent) (B). Actuarial analysis of the freedom from grade 2 late rectal toxicity for radical (RAD) versus postoperative irradiation (ART or SRT intent) in relation to the rectal volume receiving doses >70 Gy (C).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4302681&req=5

fig01: Actuarial analysis of the freedom from grade 2 late rectal toxicity for radical (RAD) versus postoperative irradiation (ART or SRT intent) (A). Actuarial analysis of the freedom from grade 2 late genitourinary (GU) toxicity for radical (RAD) versus postoperative irradiation (ART or SRT intent) (B). Actuarial analysis of the freedom from grade 2 late rectal toxicity for radical (RAD) versus postoperative irradiation (ART or SRT intent) in relation to the rectal volume receiving doses >70 Gy (C).
Mentions: None of the patients experienced late G3 urinary or rectal toxicity. At 5 years, the actuarial rates of freedom from G2 rectal late toxicity were 90.4% and 96.6% for the RAD and ART/SRT groups, respectively (Fig.1A), while the 5-year freedom from G2 late urinary toxicity were 80.5% and 91.6%, respectively (Fig.1B). Late toxicity was not significantly affected by prostatic or pelvic irradiated volume, while a significant lower G2 rectal late toxicity was observed in patients when less than 20% rectum volume received doses higher than 70 Gy (Fig.1C, P = 0.013).

Bottom Line: For the whole patient group, the 3- and 5-year freedom from biochemical failure were 82.6% and 74.6%, respectively, with a better outcome in patients treated with radical approach.The 3- and 5-year ≥G2 freedom from late rectal toxicity rate were 98% and 95%, respectively, while the 3- and 5-year ≥G2 freedom from late urinary toxicity rate were 95% and 88%, respectively.The study concludes that pelvic IMRT and SIB to the prostatic area in association with 2-year ADT was a well-tolerated technique, providing high disease control in patients with prostate cancer requiring LN treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiotherapy, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome, Italy.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus