Limits...
Spermine reverses lipopolysaccharide-induced memory deficit in mice.

Frühauf PK, Ineu RP, Tomazi L, Duarte T, Mello CF, Rubin MA - J Neuroinflammation (2015)

Bottom Line: Spermine increased but ifenprodil decreased the recognition index in the novel object recognition task.Spermine, at doses that did not alter memory (0.3 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), reversed the cognitive impairment induced by LPS.However, spermine failed to reverse the LPS-induced increase of cortical and hippocampal cytokine levels.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduation Program in Pharmacology, Center of Health Sciences, Federal University of Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS, 97105-900, Brazil. pam_fruhauf@yahoo.com.br.

ABSTRACT

Background: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces neuroinflammation and memory deficit. Since polyamines improve memory in various cognitive tasks, we hypothesized that spermine administration reverses LPS-induced memory deficits in an object recognition task in mice. The involvement of the polyamine binding site at the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor and cytokine production in the promnesic effect of spermine were investigated.

Methods: Adult male mice were injected with LPS (250 μg/kg, intraperitoneally) and spermine (0.3 to 1 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) or ifenprodil (0.3 to 10 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), or both, and their memory function was evaluated using a novel object recognition task. In addition, cortical and hippocampal cytokines levels were measured by ELISA four hours after LPS injection.

Results: Spermine increased but ifenprodil decreased the recognition index in the novel object recognition task. Spermine, at doses that did not alter memory (0.3 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), reversed the cognitive impairment induced by LPS. Ifenprodil (0.3 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) reversed the protective effect of spermine against LPS-induced memory deficits. However, spermine failed to reverse the LPS-induced increase of cortical and hippocampal cytokine levels.

Conclusions: Spermine protects against LPS-induced memory deficits in mice by a mechanism that involves GluN2B receptors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effects of LPS on memory. Post-training administration of LPS (250 μg/kg, intraperitoneally) decreased the recognition index in the object recognition task. Data are expressed as mean ± standard error of the mean for 8 animals in each group. *P < 0.01 compared with saline group (Student’s t test). LPS, lipopolysaccharide; SAL, saline.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4302583&req=5

Fig1: Effects of LPS on memory. Post-training administration of LPS (250 μg/kg, intraperitoneally) decreased the recognition index in the object recognition task. Data are expressed as mean ± standard error of the mean for 8 animals in each group. *P < 0.01 compared with saline group (Student’s t test). LPS, lipopolysaccharide; SAL, saline.

Mentions: Figure 1 shows the effect of the post-training intraperitoneal administration of LPS or saline on recognition index in the object recognition task. Statistical analysis (Student’s t test) revealed that LPS (250 μg/kg) decreased the recognition index (t14 = 3.086; P < 0.01; η2 = 0.4), compared with the control group, indicating a memory impairment in LPS-treated animals.Figure 1


Spermine reverses lipopolysaccharide-induced memory deficit in mice.

Frühauf PK, Ineu RP, Tomazi L, Duarte T, Mello CF, Rubin MA - J Neuroinflammation (2015)

Effects of LPS on memory. Post-training administration of LPS (250 μg/kg, intraperitoneally) decreased the recognition index in the object recognition task. Data are expressed as mean ± standard error of the mean for 8 animals in each group. *P < 0.01 compared with saline group (Student’s t test). LPS, lipopolysaccharide; SAL, saline.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4302583&req=5

Fig1: Effects of LPS on memory. Post-training administration of LPS (250 μg/kg, intraperitoneally) decreased the recognition index in the object recognition task. Data are expressed as mean ± standard error of the mean for 8 animals in each group. *P < 0.01 compared with saline group (Student’s t test). LPS, lipopolysaccharide; SAL, saline.
Mentions: Figure 1 shows the effect of the post-training intraperitoneal administration of LPS or saline on recognition index in the object recognition task. Statistical analysis (Student’s t test) revealed that LPS (250 μg/kg) decreased the recognition index (t14 = 3.086; P < 0.01; η2 = 0.4), compared with the control group, indicating a memory impairment in LPS-treated animals.Figure 1

Bottom Line: Spermine increased but ifenprodil decreased the recognition index in the novel object recognition task.Spermine, at doses that did not alter memory (0.3 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), reversed the cognitive impairment induced by LPS.However, spermine failed to reverse the LPS-induced increase of cortical and hippocampal cytokine levels.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduation Program in Pharmacology, Center of Health Sciences, Federal University of Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS, 97105-900, Brazil. pam_fruhauf@yahoo.com.br.

ABSTRACT

Background: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces neuroinflammation and memory deficit. Since polyamines improve memory in various cognitive tasks, we hypothesized that spermine administration reverses LPS-induced memory deficits in an object recognition task in mice. The involvement of the polyamine binding site at the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor and cytokine production in the promnesic effect of spermine were investigated.

Methods: Adult male mice were injected with LPS (250 μg/kg, intraperitoneally) and spermine (0.3 to 1 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) or ifenprodil (0.3 to 10 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), or both, and their memory function was evaluated using a novel object recognition task. In addition, cortical and hippocampal cytokines levels were measured by ELISA four hours after LPS injection.

Results: Spermine increased but ifenprodil decreased the recognition index in the novel object recognition task. Spermine, at doses that did not alter memory (0.3 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), reversed the cognitive impairment induced by LPS. Ifenprodil (0.3 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) reversed the protective effect of spermine against LPS-induced memory deficits. However, spermine failed to reverse the LPS-induced increase of cortical and hippocampal cytokine levels.

Conclusions: Spermine protects against LPS-induced memory deficits in mice by a mechanism that involves GluN2B receptors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus