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Stridor in children: Is airway always the cause?

Gupta R, Williams A, Vetrivel M, Singh G - J Pediatr Neurosci (2014 Sep-Dec)

Bottom Line: Stridor in children is usually, but not always caused by airway pathology.The anesthesiologists should have a sound knowledge of the neurological associations of stridor and its management.In such cases, prompt treatment of the neurological pathology usually resolves the stridor and may prevent unnecessary airway evaluation and intervention in the child.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India.

ABSTRACT
Stridor in children is usually, but not always caused by airway pathology. The anesthesiologists should have a sound knowledge of the neurological associations of stridor and its management. In such cases, prompt treatment of the neurological pathology usually resolves the stridor and may prevent unnecessary airway evaluation and intervention in the child.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Contrast enhanced computed tomography brain showing dilatation of all the ventricles s/o obstructive hydrocephalus
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Figure 1: Contrast enhanced computed tomography brain showing dilatation of all the ventricles s/o obstructive hydrocephalus

Mentions: An 8-month-old female baby born at term by normal vaginal delivery, from a second-degree consanguinous marriage; presented with noisy breathing and progressive increase in the size of the head for 4 weeks. There was no history of apneic or cyanotic episodes. The mother reported mild pharyngonasal reflux during feeding but no episodes of vomiting. The child underwent lumbosacral myelomeningocele repair 2 months ago. On examination, she was awake, irritable and had noisy breathing that was aggravated on crying. There were no other signs or symptoms of respiratory distress. Her heart rate was 123/min, blood pressure was 80/50 mm of Hg, respiratory rate was 38/min and oxygen saturation was 99% on room air. Glasgow Coma Scale was 15/15, head circumference was 48 cm and the anterior fontanelle was bulging and tense. Neurological examination revealed bilateral lateral rectus paresis but no up gaze paresis. Both upper limbs were spastic and the lower limbs were flaccid with grade 0 power. Contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT) brain showed dilatation of all the ventricles s/o obstructive hydrocephalus [Figure 1]. She was posted for an emergency V-P shunt insertion.


Stridor in children: Is airway always the cause?

Gupta R, Williams A, Vetrivel M, Singh G - J Pediatr Neurosci (2014 Sep-Dec)

Contrast enhanced computed tomography brain showing dilatation of all the ventricles s/o obstructive hydrocephalus
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4302552&req=5

Figure 1: Contrast enhanced computed tomography brain showing dilatation of all the ventricles s/o obstructive hydrocephalus
Mentions: An 8-month-old female baby born at term by normal vaginal delivery, from a second-degree consanguinous marriage; presented with noisy breathing and progressive increase in the size of the head for 4 weeks. There was no history of apneic or cyanotic episodes. The mother reported mild pharyngonasal reflux during feeding but no episodes of vomiting. The child underwent lumbosacral myelomeningocele repair 2 months ago. On examination, she was awake, irritable and had noisy breathing that was aggravated on crying. There were no other signs or symptoms of respiratory distress. Her heart rate was 123/min, blood pressure was 80/50 mm of Hg, respiratory rate was 38/min and oxygen saturation was 99% on room air. Glasgow Coma Scale was 15/15, head circumference was 48 cm and the anterior fontanelle was bulging and tense. Neurological examination revealed bilateral lateral rectus paresis but no up gaze paresis. Both upper limbs were spastic and the lower limbs were flaccid with grade 0 power. Contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT) brain showed dilatation of all the ventricles s/o obstructive hydrocephalus [Figure 1]. She was posted for an emergency V-P shunt insertion.

Bottom Line: Stridor in children is usually, but not always caused by airway pathology.The anesthesiologists should have a sound knowledge of the neurological associations of stridor and its management.In such cases, prompt treatment of the neurological pathology usually resolves the stridor and may prevent unnecessary airway evaluation and intervention in the child.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India.

ABSTRACT
Stridor in children is usually, but not always caused by airway pathology. The anesthesiologists should have a sound knowledge of the neurological associations of stridor and its management. In such cases, prompt treatment of the neurological pathology usually resolves the stridor and may prevent unnecessary airway evaluation and intervention in the child.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus