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Diet and glycaemia: the markers and their meaning. A report of the Unilever Nutrition Workshop.

Alssema M, Boers HM, Ceriello A, Kilpatrick ES, Mela DJ, Priebe MG, Schrauwen P, Wolffenbuttel BH, Pfeiffer AF - Br. J. Nutr. (2014)

Bottom Line: The particular focus of the meeting was to identify the potential applicability of glycaemic exposure markers for studying dietary effects in the non-diabetic population.Workshop participants concluded that markers of glycaemic exposures are sparsely used in intervention studies among non-diabetic populations.For all the markers of glycaemia, the responsiveness to interventions will probably be smaller among the non-diabetic than among the diabetic population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Unilever R&D,Olivier van Noortlaan 120,Vlaardingen,The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Consumption of carbohydrate-containing foods leads to transient postprandial rises in blood glucose concentrations that vary between food types. Higher postprandial glycaemic exposures have particularly been implicated in the development of chronic cardiometabolic diseases. Reducing such diet-related exposures may be beneficial not only for diabetic patients but also for the general population. A variety of markers have been used to track different aspects of glycaemic exposures, with most of the relevant knowledge derived from diabetic patients. The assessment of glycaemic exposures among the non-diabetic population may require other, more sensitive markers. The present report summarises key messages of presentations and related discussions from a workshop organised by Unilever intended to consider currently applied markers of glycaemic exposure. The particular focus of the meeting was to identify the potential applicability of glycaemic exposure markers for studying dietary effects in the non-diabetic population. Workshop participants concluded that markers of glycaemic exposures are sparsely used in intervention studies among non-diabetic populations. Continuous glucose monitoring remains the optimal approach to directly assess glycaemic exposure. Markers of glycaemic exposure such as glycated Hb, fructosamine, glycated albumin, 1,5-anhydroglucitol and advanced glycation end products can be preferred dependent on the aspect of interest (period of exposure and glucose variability). For all the markers of glycaemia, the responsiveness to interventions will probably be smaller among the non-diabetic than among the diabetic population. Further validation and acceptance of existing glycaemic exposure markers applied among the non-diabetic population would aid food innovation and better design of dietary interventions targeting glycaemic exposure.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Markers of glycaemic control and their temporary reflection of glycaemic exposure. 1,5-AG, 1,5-anhydroglucitol; HbA1c, glycated Hb.
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fig2: Markers of glycaemic control and their temporary reflection of glycaemic exposure. 1,5-AG, 1,5-anhydroglucitol; HbA1c, glycated Hb.

Mentions: CGM or multiple within-day measures of pre- and postprandial glucose are the ideal way of assessing glycaemia in both diabetic and non-diabetic populations. However, these measures are laborious, time-consuming and costly, so alternative markers of glycaemia are routinely used in managing patients with diabetes, and these markers can be considered for use in subjects without diabetes(52). An important difference among these glycaemic markers is the time frame of previous glycaemic exposure that is reflected (Fig. 2); however, other characteristics of such markers also define their applicability and use.Fig. 2


Diet and glycaemia: the markers and their meaning. A report of the Unilever Nutrition Workshop.

Alssema M, Boers HM, Ceriello A, Kilpatrick ES, Mela DJ, Priebe MG, Schrauwen P, Wolffenbuttel BH, Pfeiffer AF - Br. J. Nutr. (2014)

Markers of glycaemic control and their temporary reflection of glycaemic exposure. 1,5-AG, 1,5-anhydroglucitol; HbA1c, glycated Hb.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4302387&req=5

fig2: Markers of glycaemic control and their temporary reflection of glycaemic exposure. 1,5-AG, 1,5-anhydroglucitol; HbA1c, glycated Hb.
Mentions: CGM or multiple within-day measures of pre- and postprandial glucose are the ideal way of assessing glycaemia in both diabetic and non-diabetic populations. However, these measures are laborious, time-consuming and costly, so alternative markers of glycaemia are routinely used in managing patients with diabetes, and these markers can be considered for use in subjects without diabetes(52). An important difference among these glycaemic markers is the time frame of previous glycaemic exposure that is reflected (Fig. 2); however, other characteristics of such markers also define their applicability and use.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: The particular focus of the meeting was to identify the potential applicability of glycaemic exposure markers for studying dietary effects in the non-diabetic population.Workshop participants concluded that markers of glycaemic exposures are sparsely used in intervention studies among non-diabetic populations.For all the markers of glycaemia, the responsiveness to interventions will probably be smaller among the non-diabetic than among the diabetic population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Unilever R&D,Olivier van Noortlaan 120,Vlaardingen,The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Consumption of carbohydrate-containing foods leads to transient postprandial rises in blood glucose concentrations that vary between food types. Higher postprandial glycaemic exposures have particularly been implicated in the development of chronic cardiometabolic diseases. Reducing such diet-related exposures may be beneficial not only for diabetic patients but also for the general population. A variety of markers have been used to track different aspects of glycaemic exposures, with most of the relevant knowledge derived from diabetic patients. The assessment of glycaemic exposures among the non-diabetic population may require other, more sensitive markers. The present report summarises key messages of presentations and related discussions from a workshop organised by Unilever intended to consider currently applied markers of glycaemic exposure. The particular focus of the meeting was to identify the potential applicability of glycaemic exposure markers for studying dietary effects in the non-diabetic population. Workshop participants concluded that markers of glycaemic exposures are sparsely used in intervention studies among non-diabetic populations. Continuous glucose monitoring remains the optimal approach to directly assess glycaemic exposure. Markers of glycaemic exposure such as glycated Hb, fructosamine, glycated albumin, 1,5-anhydroglucitol and advanced glycation end products can be preferred dependent on the aspect of interest (period of exposure and glucose variability). For all the markers of glycaemia, the responsiveness to interventions will probably be smaller among the non-diabetic than among the diabetic population. Further validation and acceptance of existing glycaemic exposure markers applied among the non-diabetic population would aid food innovation and better design of dietary interventions targeting glycaemic exposure.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus