Limits...
Association between Glucose Levels and Intraocular Pressure: Pre- and Postprandial Analysis in Diabetic and Nondiabetic Patients.

Pimentel LG, Gracitelli CP, da Silva LS, Souza AK, Prata TS - J Ophthalmol (2015)

Bottom Line: Postprandial glucose levels were significantly higher than baseline measurements in both diabetic (P = 0.005) and nondiabetic patients (P = 0.015).In a multivariable model, the magnitude of glucose level change remained significantly associated with IOP variation even including age, baseline IOP, ancestry, and gender as a confounding factor (P < 0.001).We concluded that there is a significant association between blood glucose levels and IOP variation, especially in diabetic patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Federal University of São Paulo, 04021-001 Vila Mariana, SP, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between glucose levels and intraocular pressure (IOP) fluctuation in diabetic and nondiabetic patients. Seventeen nondiabetic and 20 diabetic subjects underwent a complete ophthalmic examination, capillary glucose testing, and applanation tonometry in two distinct situations: first, fasting for at least 8 hours and, second, postprandial measurements. Baseline glucose levels were higher in diabetic patients (P < 0.001). Postprandial IOP was significantly higher than baseline IOP in diabetic (P < 0.001) and nondiabetic patients (P = 0.006). Postprandial glucose levels were significantly higher than baseline measurements in both diabetic (P = 0.005) and nondiabetic patients (P = 0.015). There was a significant association between glucose levels variation and IOP change in both diabetic patients (R (2) = 0.540; P < 0.001) and nondiabetic individuals (R (2) = 0.291; P = 0.025). There is also a significant association between the baseline glucose levels and IOP change in diabetic group (R (2) = 0.445; P = 0.001). In a multivariable model, the magnitude of glucose level change remained significantly associated with IOP variation even including age, baseline IOP, ancestry, and gender as a confounding factor (P < 0.001). We concluded that there is a significant association between blood glucose levels and IOP variation, especially in diabetic patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Box plots showing the distribution of average IOP in diabetic and nondiabetic groups in the two different times of measurements. Box represents median and interquartile range. Whiskers correspond to maximum and minimum 1.5 IQR.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4302384&req=5

fig1: Box plots showing the distribution of average IOP in diabetic and nondiabetic groups in the two different times of measurements. Box represents median and interquartile range. Whiskers correspond to maximum and minimum 1.5 IQR.

Mentions: Postprandial IOP was significantly higher than baseline IOP in diabetic (17.8 ± 0.80 versus 15.5 ± 0.55 mmHg; P < 0.001) and nondiabetic patients (15.9 ± 0.77 versus 14.3 ± 0.72 mmHg; P = 0.006). Figure 1 shows the IOP distribution of the two groups at each time point. Postprandial glucose levels were significantly higher than baseline measurements in both diabetic (mean increase of 62 mg/dL; P = 0.005) and nondiabetic patients (mean increase of 31.5 mg/dL; P = 0.015).


Association between Glucose Levels and Intraocular Pressure: Pre- and Postprandial Analysis in Diabetic and Nondiabetic Patients.

Pimentel LG, Gracitelli CP, da Silva LS, Souza AK, Prata TS - J Ophthalmol (2015)

Box plots showing the distribution of average IOP in diabetic and nondiabetic groups in the two different times of measurements. Box represents median and interquartile range. Whiskers correspond to maximum and minimum 1.5 IQR.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4302384&req=5

fig1: Box plots showing the distribution of average IOP in diabetic and nondiabetic groups in the two different times of measurements. Box represents median and interquartile range. Whiskers correspond to maximum and minimum 1.5 IQR.
Mentions: Postprandial IOP was significantly higher than baseline IOP in diabetic (17.8 ± 0.80 versus 15.5 ± 0.55 mmHg; P < 0.001) and nondiabetic patients (15.9 ± 0.77 versus 14.3 ± 0.72 mmHg; P = 0.006). Figure 1 shows the IOP distribution of the two groups at each time point. Postprandial glucose levels were significantly higher than baseline measurements in both diabetic (mean increase of 62 mg/dL; P = 0.005) and nondiabetic patients (mean increase of 31.5 mg/dL; P = 0.015).

Bottom Line: Postprandial glucose levels were significantly higher than baseline measurements in both diabetic (P = 0.005) and nondiabetic patients (P = 0.015).In a multivariable model, the magnitude of glucose level change remained significantly associated with IOP variation even including age, baseline IOP, ancestry, and gender as a confounding factor (P < 0.001).We concluded that there is a significant association between blood glucose levels and IOP variation, especially in diabetic patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Federal University of São Paulo, 04021-001 Vila Mariana, SP, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between glucose levels and intraocular pressure (IOP) fluctuation in diabetic and nondiabetic patients. Seventeen nondiabetic and 20 diabetic subjects underwent a complete ophthalmic examination, capillary glucose testing, and applanation tonometry in two distinct situations: first, fasting for at least 8 hours and, second, postprandial measurements. Baseline glucose levels were higher in diabetic patients (P < 0.001). Postprandial IOP was significantly higher than baseline IOP in diabetic (P < 0.001) and nondiabetic patients (P = 0.006). Postprandial glucose levels were significantly higher than baseline measurements in both diabetic (P = 0.005) and nondiabetic patients (P = 0.015). There was a significant association between glucose levels variation and IOP change in both diabetic patients (R (2) = 0.540; P < 0.001) and nondiabetic individuals (R (2) = 0.291; P = 0.025). There is also a significant association between the baseline glucose levels and IOP change in diabetic group (R (2) = 0.445; P = 0.001). In a multivariable model, the magnitude of glucose level change remained significantly associated with IOP variation even including age, baseline IOP, ancestry, and gender as a confounding factor (P < 0.001). We concluded that there is a significant association between blood glucose levels and IOP variation, especially in diabetic patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus