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Neurocognitive rehabilitation in Parkinson's disease with motor imagery: a rehabilitative experience in a case report.

Zangrando F, Piccinini G, Pelliccioni A, Saraceni VM, Paolucci T - Case Rep Med (2015)

Bottom Line: The balance and the risk of falls were determined using the Tinetti Balance and Gait Evaluation Scale.Endpoints were before the treatment, at the end of the treatment, and at a 12-week follow-up.Primary outcome is the improvement in balance and the falls risk reduction; secondary outcome is lower limb pain reduction.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Complex Operative Unit in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Umberto I Hospital, "Sapienza" University of Rome, Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome, Italy.

ABSTRACT
A 50-year-old female with Parkinson's disease underwent a neurocognitive rehabilitation program consisting of one-hour-lasting sessions attended twice a week for three months. The balance and the risk of falls were determined using the Tinetti Balance and Gait Evaluation Scale. The pain was determined using the Visual Analog Scale and the course of the disease was examined using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). Endpoints were before the treatment, at the end of the treatment, and at a 12-week follow-up. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of neurocognitive rehabilitation in PD with motor imagery. Primary outcome is the improvement in balance and the falls risk reduction; secondary outcome is lower limb pain reduction.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Graphic representation of Tinetti (a) and VAS (b) results.
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fig3: Graphic representation of Tinetti (a) and VAS (b) results.

Mentions: Data were collected by a blinded tester specialist in physical medicine and rehabilitation at the beginning of treatment (T0), at the end of treatment (3 months) (T1), and at the 3-month follow-up (T2). We analyzed the balance and the risk of falls using the Tinetti Balance and Gait Evaluation Scale (28-point scale: <19 indicates a high risk for falls; 19–24 indicates a moderate risk for falls). The Visual Analog Scale (VAS) (scored 0–10) was used to quantify the pain subjectively. The course of the disease was examined using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). The Tinetti scale identified improvements in balance and indicated that the patient decreased her risk of falling, both in “ON” and “OFF” phases; these effects persisted at T2 (Figure 3). According to these results, the Pull Test, performed in the “ON” and “OFF” phases, showed an improvement in balance from T0 to T1 with confirmed results at the follow-up (“ON” phase: 1 (T0), 0 (T1), 0 (T2); “OFF” phase: 2 (T0), 1 (T1), 1 (T2)). The VAS, decreasing from 7 (T0) to 1.7 (T1), confirmed the decline in lower limb pain as a freezing prodrome, improving to 0.5 at T2. The UPDRS showed improved motor activity in the “ON” and “OFF” phases, with a resulting improvement in the activities of daily living. This score remained constant at the follow-up (Figure 4).


Neurocognitive rehabilitation in Parkinson's disease with motor imagery: a rehabilitative experience in a case report.

Zangrando F, Piccinini G, Pelliccioni A, Saraceni VM, Paolucci T - Case Rep Med (2015)

Graphic representation of Tinetti (a) and VAS (b) results.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4302360&req=5

fig3: Graphic representation of Tinetti (a) and VAS (b) results.
Mentions: Data were collected by a blinded tester specialist in physical medicine and rehabilitation at the beginning of treatment (T0), at the end of treatment (3 months) (T1), and at the 3-month follow-up (T2). We analyzed the balance and the risk of falls using the Tinetti Balance and Gait Evaluation Scale (28-point scale: <19 indicates a high risk for falls; 19–24 indicates a moderate risk for falls). The Visual Analog Scale (VAS) (scored 0–10) was used to quantify the pain subjectively. The course of the disease was examined using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). The Tinetti scale identified improvements in balance and indicated that the patient decreased her risk of falling, both in “ON” and “OFF” phases; these effects persisted at T2 (Figure 3). According to these results, the Pull Test, performed in the “ON” and “OFF” phases, showed an improvement in balance from T0 to T1 with confirmed results at the follow-up (“ON” phase: 1 (T0), 0 (T1), 0 (T2); “OFF” phase: 2 (T0), 1 (T1), 1 (T2)). The VAS, decreasing from 7 (T0) to 1.7 (T1), confirmed the decline in lower limb pain as a freezing prodrome, improving to 0.5 at T2. The UPDRS showed improved motor activity in the “ON” and “OFF” phases, with a resulting improvement in the activities of daily living. This score remained constant at the follow-up (Figure 4).

Bottom Line: The balance and the risk of falls were determined using the Tinetti Balance and Gait Evaluation Scale.Endpoints were before the treatment, at the end of the treatment, and at a 12-week follow-up.Primary outcome is the improvement in balance and the falls risk reduction; secondary outcome is lower limb pain reduction.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Complex Operative Unit in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Umberto I Hospital, "Sapienza" University of Rome, Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome, Italy.

ABSTRACT
A 50-year-old female with Parkinson's disease underwent a neurocognitive rehabilitation program consisting of one-hour-lasting sessions attended twice a week for three months. The balance and the risk of falls were determined using the Tinetti Balance and Gait Evaluation Scale. The pain was determined using the Visual Analog Scale and the course of the disease was examined using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). Endpoints were before the treatment, at the end of the treatment, and at a 12-week follow-up. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of neurocognitive rehabilitation in PD with motor imagery. Primary outcome is the improvement in balance and the falls risk reduction; secondary outcome is lower limb pain reduction.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus