Limits...
Effects of home-based respiratory muscle training in children and adolescents with chronic lung disease.

Núñez IR, Araos DZ, Delgado CM - J Bras Pneumol (2014 Nov-Dec)

Bottom Line: We made statistical comparisons between the pre-RMT and post-RMT values, as well as evaluating the correlation between the duration and effect of RMT.We found no correlation between the duration and the effect of RMT.Home-based RMT appears to be an effective strategy for increasing respiratory muscle strength in children and adolescents with CLD or NMD, although it increased the ability to cough effectively only in those with NMD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: San Sebastian University, Faculty of Health Science, Center of Molecular Medicine, Concepción, Chile. Center of Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Health Science, San Sebastian University. Concepción. Chile.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Respiratory muscle weakness is a functional repercussion of chronic lung disease (CLD). The objective of this study was to assess the effects of home-based respiratory muscle training (RMT) in children and adolescents with CLD or neuromuscular disease (NMD).

Methods: This was a quasi-experimental study involving children and adolescents with CLD or NMD. Before and after 6 months of home-based RMT, we measured respiratory muscle strength (MIP and MEP), PEF, and peak cough flow (PCF). We made statistical comparisons between the pre-RMT and post-RMT values, as well as evaluating the correlation between the duration and effect of RMT.

Results: The study included 29 patients, with a mean age of 12 years (range, 5-17 years), of whom 18 (62.1%) were male. The CLD group comprised 11 patients (37.9%), and the NMD group comprised 18 (62.1%). The mean duration of the RMT was 60 weeks (range, 46-90 weeks) in the CLD group and 39 weeks (range, 24-89 weeks) in the NMD group. In comparison with the pre-RMT values, the post-RMT values for MIP and MEP were significantly higher in both groups, whereas those for PEF and PCF were significantly higher only in the NMD group. We found no correlation between the duration and the effect of RMT.

Conclusions: Home-based RMT appears to be an effective strategy for increasing respiratory muscle strength in children and adolescents with CLD or NMD, although it increased the ability to cough effectively only in those with NMD.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of respiratory muscle training (RMT) on peak cough flow in children and adolescents with neuromuscular disease. *p < 0.05 (Wilcoxon signed rank test for paired comparisons).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4301247&req=5

f02: Effect of respiratory muscle training (RMT) on peak cough flow in children and adolescents with neuromuscular disease. *p < 0.05 (Wilcoxon signed rank test for paired comparisons).

Mentions: In the NMD group, there was a significant post-RMT increase in respiratory muscle strength, as evidenced by the mean improvements (over baseline) in MIP (an increase in the absolute value of 25 cmH2O [45.4%; p = 0.004], as well as an increase in the percentage of the predicted value [from 44.5% {range, 22.9-90.0%} to 63.0% {range, 30.7-100%}; p = 0.01; Figure 1A]) and in MEP (an increase in the absolute value of 15 cmH2O [37.5%; p = 0.007], as well as an increase in the percentage of the predicted value [from 28% {range, 9-48%} to 33% {range, 11-62%}; p = 0.002; Figure 1B]). In the CLD group, there were similar post-RMT improvements in the mean MIP values (an increase in the absolute value of 20 cmH2O [33.3%; p = 0.01], as well as an increase in the percentage of the predicted value [from 47.5% {range, 19-82%} to 73% {range, 32-110%}; p = 0.005; Figure 1A]) and in the mean MEP values (an increase in the absolute value of 20 cmH2O [33.3%; p = 0.02], as well as an increase in the percentage of the predicted value [from 39% {range, 28-74%} to 48% {range, 27-85%}; p = 0.021; Figure 1B]). Table 3 shows the variations between the pre- and post-RMT evaluations, by group. As can be seen there (and in Figure 2), the mean PEF increased by 85 L/min (56.6%) in the NMD group (p = 0.001), compared with only 25 L/min (14.2%) in the CLD group (p = ns), whereas the mean PCF increased by 55 L/min in the NMD group (31.4%; p = 0.001), compared with only 16 L/min (8.5%) in the CLD group (p = ns). We found no correlation between the duration and the effect of the RMT, in either group.


Effects of home-based respiratory muscle training in children and adolescents with chronic lung disease.

Núñez IR, Araos DZ, Delgado CM - J Bras Pneumol (2014 Nov-Dec)

Effect of respiratory muscle training (RMT) on peak cough flow in children and adolescents with neuromuscular disease. *p < 0.05 (Wilcoxon signed rank test for paired comparisons).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4301247&req=5

f02: Effect of respiratory muscle training (RMT) on peak cough flow in children and adolescents with neuromuscular disease. *p < 0.05 (Wilcoxon signed rank test for paired comparisons).
Mentions: In the NMD group, there was a significant post-RMT increase in respiratory muscle strength, as evidenced by the mean improvements (over baseline) in MIP (an increase in the absolute value of 25 cmH2O [45.4%; p = 0.004], as well as an increase in the percentage of the predicted value [from 44.5% {range, 22.9-90.0%} to 63.0% {range, 30.7-100%}; p = 0.01; Figure 1A]) and in MEP (an increase in the absolute value of 15 cmH2O [37.5%; p = 0.007], as well as an increase in the percentage of the predicted value [from 28% {range, 9-48%} to 33% {range, 11-62%}; p = 0.002; Figure 1B]). In the CLD group, there were similar post-RMT improvements in the mean MIP values (an increase in the absolute value of 20 cmH2O [33.3%; p = 0.01], as well as an increase in the percentage of the predicted value [from 47.5% {range, 19-82%} to 73% {range, 32-110%}; p = 0.005; Figure 1A]) and in the mean MEP values (an increase in the absolute value of 20 cmH2O [33.3%; p = 0.02], as well as an increase in the percentage of the predicted value [from 39% {range, 28-74%} to 48% {range, 27-85%}; p = 0.021; Figure 1B]). Table 3 shows the variations between the pre- and post-RMT evaluations, by group. As can be seen there (and in Figure 2), the mean PEF increased by 85 L/min (56.6%) in the NMD group (p = 0.001), compared with only 25 L/min (14.2%) in the CLD group (p = ns), whereas the mean PCF increased by 55 L/min in the NMD group (31.4%; p = 0.001), compared with only 16 L/min (8.5%) in the CLD group (p = ns). We found no correlation between the duration and the effect of the RMT, in either group.

Bottom Line: We made statistical comparisons between the pre-RMT and post-RMT values, as well as evaluating the correlation between the duration and effect of RMT.We found no correlation between the duration and the effect of RMT.Home-based RMT appears to be an effective strategy for increasing respiratory muscle strength in children and adolescents with CLD or NMD, although it increased the ability to cough effectively only in those with NMD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: San Sebastian University, Faculty of Health Science, Center of Molecular Medicine, Concepción, Chile. Center of Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Health Science, San Sebastian University. Concepción. Chile.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Respiratory muscle weakness is a functional repercussion of chronic lung disease (CLD). The objective of this study was to assess the effects of home-based respiratory muscle training (RMT) in children and adolescents with CLD or neuromuscular disease (NMD).

Methods: This was a quasi-experimental study involving children and adolescents with CLD or NMD. Before and after 6 months of home-based RMT, we measured respiratory muscle strength (MIP and MEP), PEF, and peak cough flow (PCF). We made statistical comparisons between the pre-RMT and post-RMT values, as well as evaluating the correlation between the duration and effect of RMT.

Results: The study included 29 patients, with a mean age of 12 years (range, 5-17 years), of whom 18 (62.1%) were male. The CLD group comprised 11 patients (37.9%), and the NMD group comprised 18 (62.1%). The mean duration of the RMT was 60 weeks (range, 46-90 weeks) in the CLD group and 39 weeks (range, 24-89 weeks) in the NMD group. In comparison with the pre-RMT values, the post-RMT values for MIP and MEP were significantly higher in both groups, whereas those for PEF and PCF were significantly higher only in the NMD group. We found no correlation between the duration and the effect of RMT.

Conclusions: Home-based RMT appears to be an effective strategy for increasing respiratory muscle strength in children and adolescents with CLD or NMD, although it increased the ability to cough effectively only in those with NMD.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus