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The Chondrogenic Potential of Mesenchymal Cells and Chondrocytes from Osteoarthritic Subjects: A Comparative Analysis.

Agar G, Blumenstein S, Bar-Ziv Y, Kardosh R, Schrift-Tzadok M, Gal-Levy R, Fischler T, Goldschmid R, Yayon A - Cartilage (2011)

Bottom Line: Cartilage-derived articular chondrocytes are superior to bone marrow-derived cells when compared for their ex vivo chondrogenic potential.Interestingly, there was marked and significant difference in the expression of chondrocytic markers between chondrocytes derived from adjacent, visually distinct regions of the diseased cartilage.Although bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cells, when supplemented with the appropriate chondrogenic factors, are a suitable source for autologous cartilage implantation, adult chondroprogenitor cells, particularly those from moderately affected regions of the osteoarthritic joints, demonstrate superior chondrogenic potential.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Asaf HaRofeh Medical Center, Zrifin, Israel.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The multipotential nature of stem or progenitor cells apparently makes them the ideal choice for any cell therapy, but this as yet remains to be proven. This study (30 subjects) was designed to compare the potential to repair articular cartilage of chondrocytes taken from different regions in osteoarthritic cartilage with that of mesenchymal stem cells prepared from bone marrow of the same subject.

Design: Cartilage biopsies, bone marrow, and blood samples were taken from each of 30 individuals with chronic osteoarthritis (aged 62-85 years) undergoing total knee replacement. The chondrogenic potential of chondrocytes isolated from cartilage biopsies taken from different regions of osteoarthritic cartilage was compared with that of mesenchymal cells by quantitative analysis of several chondrocyte specific markers and an ex vivo cartilage differentiation assay.

Results: Cartilage-derived articular chondrocytes are superior to bone marrow-derived cells when compared for their ex vivo chondrogenic potential. Interestingly, there was marked and significant difference in the expression of chondrocytic markers between chondrocytes derived from adjacent, visually distinct regions of the diseased cartilage. When cultured in the presence of a fibroblast growth factor 2 variant, all cell samples from both tissues showed a high degree of chondrogenic potential.

Conclusions: Although bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cells, when supplemented with the appropriate chondrogenic factors, are a suitable source for autologous cartilage implantation, adult chondroprogenitor cells, particularly those from moderately affected regions of the osteoarthritic joints, demonstrate superior chondrogenic potential.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Proliferation curves of bone marrow (BM)–mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) and moderate or severely affected chondrocytes. BM-derived MSCs or chondrocytes derived from cartilage moderately or severely affected with osteoarthritis were cultured as described in the Materials and Methods section. The cell concentration and viability were determined at various time points during the culture. The results from 3 individual subjects (mean and standard deviation) are shown to illustrate the individual variability in the rate of cell proliferation.
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fig2-1947603510380899: Proliferation curves of bone marrow (BM)–mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) and moderate or severely affected chondrocytes. BM-derived MSCs or chondrocytes derived from cartilage moderately or severely affected with osteoarthritis were cultured as described in the Materials and Methods section. The cell concentration and viability were determined at various time points during the culture. The results from 3 individual subjects (mean and standard deviation) are shown to illustrate the individual variability in the rate of cell proliferation.

Mentions: The rates of proliferation of chondrocytes isolated from moderately or severely affected cartilage and of MSCs from 3 representative patients are shown in Figure 2. Although the absolute rates of proliferation were individual to the different patients, the trend for relative rates was maintained between subjects. Chondrocytes cultured with FGF2v1 proliferated faster than cells cultured without FGF2v1, whether derived from moderate or severely affected cartilage. Analysis of the doubling time for chondrocytes isolated from either moderate or severely affected OA cartilage showed no significant difference between them, although both tissue types demonstrated a highly significant decrease in doubling time when the cells were cultured with FGF2v1 (2.5 days with ligand vs 5.8 days without ligand for the moderate and 2.5 vs 5.4 days for the severely affected OA chondrocytes; Table 1).


The Chondrogenic Potential of Mesenchymal Cells and Chondrocytes from Osteoarthritic Subjects: A Comparative Analysis.

Agar G, Blumenstein S, Bar-Ziv Y, Kardosh R, Schrift-Tzadok M, Gal-Levy R, Fischler T, Goldschmid R, Yayon A - Cartilage (2011)

Proliferation curves of bone marrow (BM)–mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) and moderate or severely affected chondrocytes. BM-derived MSCs or chondrocytes derived from cartilage moderately or severely affected with osteoarthritis were cultured as described in the Materials and Methods section. The cell concentration and viability were determined at various time points during the culture. The results from 3 individual subjects (mean and standard deviation) are shown to illustrate the individual variability in the rate of cell proliferation.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4300788&req=5

fig2-1947603510380899: Proliferation curves of bone marrow (BM)–mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) and moderate or severely affected chondrocytes. BM-derived MSCs or chondrocytes derived from cartilage moderately or severely affected with osteoarthritis were cultured as described in the Materials and Methods section. The cell concentration and viability were determined at various time points during the culture. The results from 3 individual subjects (mean and standard deviation) are shown to illustrate the individual variability in the rate of cell proliferation.
Mentions: The rates of proliferation of chondrocytes isolated from moderately or severely affected cartilage and of MSCs from 3 representative patients are shown in Figure 2. Although the absolute rates of proliferation were individual to the different patients, the trend for relative rates was maintained between subjects. Chondrocytes cultured with FGF2v1 proliferated faster than cells cultured without FGF2v1, whether derived from moderate or severely affected cartilage. Analysis of the doubling time for chondrocytes isolated from either moderate or severely affected OA cartilage showed no significant difference between them, although both tissue types demonstrated a highly significant decrease in doubling time when the cells were cultured with FGF2v1 (2.5 days with ligand vs 5.8 days without ligand for the moderate and 2.5 vs 5.4 days for the severely affected OA chondrocytes; Table 1).

Bottom Line: Cartilage-derived articular chondrocytes are superior to bone marrow-derived cells when compared for their ex vivo chondrogenic potential.Interestingly, there was marked and significant difference in the expression of chondrocytic markers between chondrocytes derived from adjacent, visually distinct regions of the diseased cartilage.Although bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cells, when supplemented with the appropriate chondrogenic factors, are a suitable source for autologous cartilage implantation, adult chondroprogenitor cells, particularly those from moderately affected regions of the osteoarthritic joints, demonstrate superior chondrogenic potential.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Asaf HaRofeh Medical Center, Zrifin, Israel.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The multipotential nature of stem or progenitor cells apparently makes them the ideal choice for any cell therapy, but this as yet remains to be proven. This study (30 subjects) was designed to compare the potential to repair articular cartilage of chondrocytes taken from different regions in osteoarthritic cartilage with that of mesenchymal stem cells prepared from bone marrow of the same subject.

Design: Cartilage biopsies, bone marrow, and blood samples were taken from each of 30 individuals with chronic osteoarthritis (aged 62-85 years) undergoing total knee replacement. The chondrogenic potential of chondrocytes isolated from cartilage biopsies taken from different regions of osteoarthritic cartilage was compared with that of mesenchymal cells by quantitative analysis of several chondrocyte specific markers and an ex vivo cartilage differentiation assay.

Results: Cartilage-derived articular chondrocytes are superior to bone marrow-derived cells when compared for their ex vivo chondrogenic potential. Interestingly, there was marked and significant difference in the expression of chondrocytic markers between chondrocytes derived from adjacent, visually distinct regions of the diseased cartilage. When cultured in the presence of a fibroblast growth factor 2 variant, all cell samples from both tissues showed a high degree of chondrogenic potential.

Conclusions: Although bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cells, when supplemented with the appropriate chondrogenic factors, are a suitable source for autologous cartilage implantation, adult chondroprogenitor cells, particularly those from moderately affected regions of the osteoarthritic joints, demonstrate superior chondrogenic potential.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus