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Mapping the dynamics of force transduction at cell-cell junctions of epithelial clusters.

Ng MR, Besser A, Brugge JS, Danuser G - Elife (2014)

Bottom Line: We developed computational and experimental approaches to quantify, with both sub-cellular and multi-cellular resolution, the dynamics of force transmission in cell clusters.Applying this technology to spontaneously-forming adherent epithelial cell clusters, we found that basal force fluctuations were coupled to E-cadherin localization at the level of individual cell–cell junctions.Importantly, force transmission through a cell required coordinated modulation of cell-matrix adhesion and actomyosin contractility in the cell and its neighbors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States.

ABSTRACT
Force transduction at cell–cell adhesions regulates tissue development, maintenance and adaptation. We developed computational and experimental approaches to quantify, with both sub-cellular and multi-cellular resolution, the dynamics of force transmission in cell clusters. Applying this technology to spontaneously-forming adherent epithelial cell clusters, we found that basal force fluctuations were coupled to E-cadherin localization at the level of individual cell–cell junctions. At the multi-cellular scale, cell–cell force exchange depended on the cell position within a cluster, and was adaptive to reconfigurations due to cell divisions or positional rearrangements. Importantly, force transmission through a cell required coordinated modulation of cell-matrix adhesion and actomyosin contractility in the cell and its neighbors. These data provide insights into mechanisms that could control mechanical stress homeostasis in dynamic epithelial tissues, and highlight our methods as a resource for the study of mechanotransduction in cell–cell adhesions [corrected].

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Localization of focal adhesions and cell–cell adhesions in MCF10A cell clusters.(A–B) Focal adhesions in a representative MCF10A cell pair (A) and 4-cell cluster visualized by immunostaining of paxillin, cell–cell junctions visualized by E-cadherin-GFP. Fluorescence images were acquired using the same parameters as for TFM measurements.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03282.018
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fig8: Localization of focal adhesions and cell–cell adhesions in MCF10A cell clusters.(A–B) Focal adhesions in a representative MCF10A cell pair (A) and 4-cell cluster visualized by immunostaining of paxillin, cell–cell junctions visualized by E-cadherin-GFP. Fluorescence images were acquired using the same parameters as for TFM measurements.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03282.018

Mentions: Our measurements of cell–cell force fluctuations during mitosis also revealed spatial patterns of force transduction between multiple connected cells. When junctions were re-established after mitosis, those embedded in the cell cluster had lower force transmission compared to junctions at the cluster periphery (network in Figure 4C; Figure 4—figure supplement 1B). To further examine the spatial distribution of cell–cell forces, we categorized each cell in a cell cluster by the number of its neighbors or its degree of connectivity (k) (Figure 1). With increasing k, the sum of cell–cell forces increased (Figure 7A), which indicates that the cumulative force a cell experiences through its cell–cell adhesions increases with the number of connected neighbors. Strikingly, the increase in cumulative cell–cell forces for higher k-values was not paralleled by stronger cell–matrix traction forces (Figure 7B). Thus, contrary to the conclusions drawn from examining cell doublets (Maruthamuthu et al., 2011), the generation and exchange of forces at cell–cell junctions can be decoupled from cell–matrix traction force generation, especially in larger cell clusters where cells have higher k values. This result is further supported by the observation that focal adhesions and traction forces are primarily localized at the periphery of cell clusters (Figure 8), consistent with a previous report (Mertz et al., 2013).10.7554/eLife.03282.017Figure 7.Spatial organization of cell–cell forces in clusters.


Mapping the dynamics of force transduction at cell-cell junctions of epithelial clusters.

Ng MR, Besser A, Brugge JS, Danuser G - Elife (2014)

Localization of focal adhesions and cell–cell adhesions in MCF10A cell clusters.(A–B) Focal adhesions in a representative MCF10A cell pair (A) and 4-cell cluster visualized by immunostaining of paxillin, cell–cell junctions visualized by E-cadherin-GFP. Fluorescence images were acquired using the same parameters as for TFM measurements.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03282.018
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4300730&req=5

fig8: Localization of focal adhesions and cell–cell adhesions in MCF10A cell clusters.(A–B) Focal adhesions in a representative MCF10A cell pair (A) and 4-cell cluster visualized by immunostaining of paxillin, cell–cell junctions visualized by E-cadherin-GFP. Fluorescence images were acquired using the same parameters as for TFM measurements.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03282.018
Mentions: Our measurements of cell–cell force fluctuations during mitosis also revealed spatial patterns of force transduction between multiple connected cells. When junctions were re-established after mitosis, those embedded in the cell cluster had lower force transmission compared to junctions at the cluster periphery (network in Figure 4C; Figure 4—figure supplement 1B). To further examine the spatial distribution of cell–cell forces, we categorized each cell in a cell cluster by the number of its neighbors or its degree of connectivity (k) (Figure 1). With increasing k, the sum of cell–cell forces increased (Figure 7A), which indicates that the cumulative force a cell experiences through its cell–cell adhesions increases with the number of connected neighbors. Strikingly, the increase in cumulative cell–cell forces for higher k-values was not paralleled by stronger cell–matrix traction forces (Figure 7B). Thus, contrary to the conclusions drawn from examining cell doublets (Maruthamuthu et al., 2011), the generation and exchange of forces at cell–cell junctions can be decoupled from cell–matrix traction force generation, especially in larger cell clusters where cells have higher k values. This result is further supported by the observation that focal adhesions and traction forces are primarily localized at the periphery of cell clusters (Figure 8), consistent with a previous report (Mertz et al., 2013).10.7554/eLife.03282.017Figure 7.Spatial organization of cell–cell forces in clusters.

Bottom Line: We developed computational and experimental approaches to quantify, with both sub-cellular and multi-cellular resolution, the dynamics of force transmission in cell clusters.Applying this technology to spontaneously-forming adherent epithelial cell clusters, we found that basal force fluctuations were coupled to E-cadherin localization at the level of individual cell–cell junctions.Importantly, force transmission through a cell required coordinated modulation of cell-matrix adhesion and actomyosin contractility in the cell and its neighbors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States.

ABSTRACT
Force transduction at cell–cell adhesions regulates tissue development, maintenance and adaptation. We developed computational and experimental approaches to quantify, with both sub-cellular and multi-cellular resolution, the dynamics of force transmission in cell clusters. Applying this technology to spontaneously-forming adherent epithelial cell clusters, we found that basal force fluctuations were coupled to E-cadherin localization at the level of individual cell–cell junctions. At the multi-cellular scale, cell–cell force exchange depended on the cell position within a cluster, and was adaptive to reconfigurations due to cell divisions or positional rearrangements. Importantly, force transmission through a cell required coordinated modulation of cell-matrix adhesion and actomyosin contractility in the cell and its neighbors. These data provide insights into mechanisms that could control mechanical stress homeostasis in dynamic epithelial tissues, and highlight our methods as a resource for the study of mechanotransduction in cell–cell adhesions [corrected].

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus