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Development of learning objectives for neurology in a veterinary curriculum: part I: undergraduates.

Lin YW, Volk HA, Penderis J, Tipold A, Ehlers JP - BMC Vet. Res. (2015)

Bottom Line: In the second phase, a quantitative questionnaire (multiple choice, Likert scale and free text) covering 140 learning objectives and subdivided into 8 categories was sent to 341 ESVN and ECVN members and a return rate of 62% (n = 213/341) was achieved.Of these 140 learning objectives ECVN Diplomates and ESVN members considered 42 (30%) objectives as not necessary for standard clinical veterinary neurology training, 94 (67%) were graded to be learned at a beginner level and 4 (3%) at an advanced level.The results of this study should help to reform the veterinary curriculum regarding neurology and may reduce the phenomenon of "Neurophobia".

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Hannover, Germany. alan.ywlin@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: With an increasing caseload of veterinary neurology patients in first opinion practice, there is a requirement to establish relevant learning objectives for veterinary neurology encompassing knowledge, skills and attitudes for veterinary undergraduate students in Europe. With help of experts in veterinary neurology from the European College of Veterinary Neurology (ECVN) and the European Society of Veterinary Neurology (ESVN) a survey of veterinary neurologic learning objectives using a modified Delphi method was conducted. The first phase comprised the development of a draft job description and learning objectives by a working group established by the ECVN. In the second phase, a quantitative questionnaire (multiple choice, Likert scale and free text) covering 140 learning objectives and subdivided into 8 categories was sent to 341 ESVN and ECVN members and a return rate of 62% (n = 213/341) was achieved.

Results: Of these 140 learning objectives ECVN Diplomates and ESVN members considered 42 (30%) objectives as not necessary for standard clinical veterinary neurology training, 94 (67%) were graded to be learned at a beginner level and 4 (3%) at an advanced level. The following objectives were interpreted as the most important day one skills: interpret laboratory tests, perform a neurological examination and establish a neuroanatomical localization. In this survey the three most important diseases of the central nervous system included epilepsy, intervertebral disc disease and inflammatory diseases. The three most important diseases of the peripheral nervous system included polyradiculoneuritis, myasthenia gravis and toxic neuropathies.

Conclusions: The results of this study should help to reform the veterinary curriculum regarding neurology and may reduce the phenomenon of "Neurophobia".

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of expected level from the groups ESVN and ECVN. By ESVN, 26% (n = 36) of learning objectives would be considered as not necessary, 71% (n = 99) as beginner and 3 (n = 5) as adcanced. By ECVN, 22% (n = 31) as not necessary, 74% (n = 104) as beginner and 4% (n = 5) as advanced.
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Fig1: Distribution of expected level from the groups ESVN and ECVN. By ESVN, 26% (n = 36) of learning objectives would be considered as not necessary, 71% (n = 99) as beginner and 3 (n = 5) as adcanced. By ECVN, 22% (n = 31) as not necessary, 74% (n = 104) as beginner and 4% (n = 5) as advanced.

Mentions: All 164 completed questionnaires were included in the analysis (83 ESVN members and 81 ECVN-Diplomates). Interestingly, there was no difference between ESVN and ECVN members in what level they expected from an undergraduate veterinary student (FigureΒ 1). Of the 140 learning objectives, significant differences (P < 0.05) were detected in only 8 learning objectives (TableΒ 3), of which 6 learning objectives received a higher rating from ECVN Diplomates.Figure 1


Development of learning objectives for neurology in a veterinary curriculum: part I: undergraduates.

Lin YW, Volk HA, Penderis J, Tipold A, Ehlers JP - BMC Vet. Res. (2015)

Distribution of expected level from the groups ESVN and ECVN. By ESVN, 26% (n = 36) of learning objectives would be considered as not necessary, 71% (n = 99) as beginner and 3 (n = 5) as adcanced. By ECVN, 22% (n = 31) as not necessary, 74% (n = 104) as beginner and 4% (n = 5) as advanced.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4300725&req=5

Fig1: Distribution of expected level from the groups ESVN and ECVN. By ESVN, 26% (n = 36) of learning objectives would be considered as not necessary, 71% (n = 99) as beginner and 3 (n = 5) as adcanced. By ECVN, 22% (n = 31) as not necessary, 74% (n = 104) as beginner and 4% (n = 5) as advanced.
Mentions: All 164 completed questionnaires were included in the analysis (83 ESVN members and 81 ECVN-Diplomates). Interestingly, there was no difference between ESVN and ECVN members in what level they expected from an undergraduate veterinary student (FigureΒ 1). Of the 140 learning objectives, significant differences (P < 0.05) were detected in only 8 learning objectives (TableΒ 3), of which 6 learning objectives received a higher rating from ECVN Diplomates.Figure 1

Bottom Line: In the second phase, a quantitative questionnaire (multiple choice, Likert scale and free text) covering 140 learning objectives and subdivided into 8 categories was sent to 341 ESVN and ECVN members and a return rate of 62% (n = 213/341) was achieved.Of these 140 learning objectives ECVN Diplomates and ESVN members considered 42 (30%) objectives as not necessary for standard clinical veterinary neurology training, 94 (67%) were graded to be learned at a beginner level and 4 (3%) at an advanced level.The results of this study should help to reform the veterinary curriculum regarding neurology and may reduce the phenomenon of "Neurophobia".

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Hannover, Germany. alan.ywlin@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: With an increasing caseload of veterinary neurology patients in first opinion practice, there is a requirement to establish relevant learning objectives for veterinary neurology encompassing knowledge, skills and attitudes for veterinary undergraduate students in Europe. With help of experts in veterinary neurology from the European College of Veterinary Neurology (ECVN) and the European Society of Veterinary Neurology (ESVN) a survey of veterinary neurologic learning objectives using a modified Delphi method was conducted. The first phase comprised the development of a draft job description and learning objectives by a working group established by the ECVN. In the second phase, a quantitative questionnaire (multiple choice, Likert scale and free text) covering 140 learning objectives and subdivided into 8 categories was sent to 341 ESVN and ECVN members and a return rate of 62% (n = 213/341) was achieved.

Results: Of these 140 learning objectives ECVN Diplomates and ESVN members considered 42 (30%) objectives as not necessary for standard clinical veterinary neurology training, 94 (67%) were graded to be learned at a beginner level and 4 (3%) at an advanced level. The following objectives were interpreted as the most important day one skills: interpret laboratory tests, perform a neurological examination and establish a neuroanatomical localization. In this survey the three most important diseases of the central nervous system included epilepsy, intervertebral disc disease and inflammatory diseases. The three most important diseases of the peripheral nervous system included polyradiculoneuritis, myasthenia gravis and toxic neuropathies.

Conclusions: The results of this study should help to reform the veterinary curriculum regarding neurology and may reduce the phenomenon of "Neurophobia".

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus