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Preparation and application of oyster shell supported zero valent nano scale iron for removal of natural organic matter from aqueous solutions.

Alipour V, Nasseri S, Nabizadeh Nodehi R, Mahvi AH, Rashidi A - J Environ Health Sci Eng (2014)

Bottom Line: The chemical structure of nanoadsorbent was proper and free from harmful substances.Despite the relative good condition of the effective surface, due to the large size of the shell, the overall micropore volume was low.Hence the qualitative characteristics the adsorbent caused the absorption capacity of humic acid to be low (0.96 mg/g).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Health Engineering, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: In this Research, oyster shell supported zero valent iron nanoparticles were prepared and applied for the removal of natural organic matters (NOMs) from aqueous solutions under different experimental conditions.

Methods: The nanoadsorbents prepared by wet impregnation method, then characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy, X-Ray Fluorescence and BET analysis. Adsorption test was done in a batch reactor and the effects of different parameters such as initial adsorbate concentration, adsorbent dose, adsorption kinetic, pH, and temperature on removal of NOMs (humic acid as the indicator) were studied.

Results: Results showed that particle size of nanoadsorbent was in the range of 60-83 nm, and surface area and micropore volume as 16.85 m(2)/g and 0.021 m(3)/g, respectively; the main elements of adsorbent were Ca, O, Fe and Na and lime, as high as about 94.25% was the main structural component of the total weight. Produced nanoadsorbent was not soluble in water. It was also shown that by increasing the nanoadsorbent dose from 0.5 to 5 g/100 ml, the removal of humic acid increased from 62.3% to 97.4%. An inverse relationship was found between initial concentration and adsorption capacity, so that a decreasing rate of 33% for humic acid removal was observed by increasing pH from 5 to 10. Temperature increase from 25°C to 40°C, resulted in an increase in humic acid removal from 76.8% to 91.4% and its adsorption on the adsorbent could be better described by Freundlich isotherm (n = 0.016, Kf = 0.013 and R(2) = 0.74). The most fitted adsorption kinetic model was pseudo-second order model.

Conclusions: The chemical structure of nanoadsorbent was proper and free from harmful substances. Despite the relative good condition of the effective surface, due to the large size of the shell, the overall micropore volume was low. Hence the qualitative characteristics the adsorbent caused the absorption capacity of humic acid to be low (0.96 mg/g).

No MeSH data available.


The effect of the adsorbent dose @ (HA = 5 mg/L, Temp = 25°C and pH = 7).
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Fig2: The effect of the adsorbent dose @ (HA = 5 mg/L, Temp = 25°C and pH = 7).

Mentions: The effect of the initial HA concentration on its adsorption is shown in Figure 2. Although by increasing the nanoadsorbent dose of 0.5 to 10 mg/L, the removal of HA (C = 5 mg/L) was found to increase from 66.4% to 97.4%, the amount of removed HA (mg) per mass of nanoadsorbent showed a decrease in the rate from 0.66 mg/g to 0.09 mg/g. This is because of the fact that increasing adsorbent dosage increases the surface area for adsorption. However, very slow increase in the removal was observed beyond the dose of 3 g/L. This section of our results was in accordance with a study of Doulia etal who studied the adsorption of humic acid on acid-activated Greek bentonite [13].Figure 2


Preparation and application of oyster shell supported zero valent nano scale iron for removal of natural organic matter from aqueous solutions.

Alipour V, Nasseri S, Nabizadeh Nodehi R, Mahvi AH, Rashidi A - J Environ Health Sci Eng (2014)

The effect of the adsorbent dose @ (HA = 5 mg/L, Temp = 25°C and pH = 7).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4300684&req=5

Fig2: The effect of the adsorbent dose @ (HA = 5 mg/L, Temp = 25°C and pH = 7).
Mentions: The effect of the initial HA concentration on its adsorption is shown in Figure 2. Although by increasing the nanoadsorbent dose of 0.5 to 10 mg/L, the removal of HA (C = 5 mg/L) was found to increase from 66.4% to 97.4%, the amount of removed HA (mg) per mass of nanoadsorbent showed a decrease in the rate from 0.66 mg/g to 0.09 mg/g. This is because of the fact that increasing adsorbent dosage increases the surface area for adsorption. However, very slow increase in the removal was observed beyond the dose of 3 g/L. This section of our results was in accordance with a study of Doulia etal who studied the adsorption of humic acid on acid-activated Greek bentonite [13].Figure 2

Bottom Line: The chemical structure of nanoadsorbent was proper and free from harmful substances.Despite the relative good condition of the effective surface, due to the large size of the shell, the overall micropore volume was low.Hence the qualitative characteristics the adsorbent caused the absorption capacity of humic acid to be low (0.96 mg/g).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Health Engineering, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: In this Research, oyster shell supported zero valent iron nanoparticles were prepared and applied for the removal of natural organic matters (NOMs) from aqueous solutions under different experimental conditions.

Methods: The nanoadsorbents prepared by wet impregnation method, then characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy, X-Ray Fluorescence and BET analysis. Adsorption test was done in a batch reactor and the effects of different parameters such as initial adsorbate concentration, adsorbent dose, adsorption kinetic, pH, and temperature on removal of NOMs (humic acid as the indicator) were studied.

Results: Results showed that particle size of nanoadsorbent was in the range of 60-83 nm, and surface area and micropore volume as 16.85 m(2)/g and 0.021 m(3)/g, respectively; the main elements of adsorbent were Ca, O, Fe and Na and lime, as high as about 94.25% was the main structural component of the total weight. Produced nanoadsorbent was not soluble in water. It was also shown that by increasing the nanoadsorbent dose from 0.5 to 5 g/100 ml, the removal of humic acid increased from 62.3% to 97.4%. An inverse relationship was found between initial concentration and adsorption capacity, so that a decreasing rate of 33% for humic acid removal was observed by increasing pH from 5 to 10. Temperature increase from 25°C to 40°C, resulted in an increase in humic acid removal from 76.8% to 91.4% and its adsorption on the adsorbent could be better described by Freundlich isotherm (n = 0.016, Kf = 0.013 and R(2) = 0.74). The most fitted adsorption kinetic model was pseudo-second order model.

Conclusions: The chemical structure of nanoadsorbent was proper and free from harmful substances. Despite the relative good condition of the effective surface, due to the large size of the shell, the overall micropore volume was low. Hence the qualitative characteristics the adsorbent caused the absorption capacity of humic acid to be low (0.96 mg/g).

No MeSH data available.