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Inguinoscrotal pain resistant to conventional treatment.

Jain A, Agarwal A - Indian J Urol (2015 Jan-Mar)

Bottom Line: Inguinoscrotal pain (ISP) is a common complaint that affects almost all age groups.The etiology may be vascular, neurogenic, visceral, muscular or psychological.Most causes of ISP are benign, but Pott's spine as a cause of ISP, when missed, may lead to serious outcomes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesia, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India.

ABSTRACT
Inguinoscrotal pain (ISP) is a common complaint that affects almost all age groups. The etiology may be vascular, neurogenic, visceral, muscular or psychological. Most causes of ISP are benign, but Pott's spine as a cause of ISP, when missed, may lead to serious outcomes.

No MeSH data available.


T1-weighted axial magnetic resonance imaging section showing contrast enhancement in the psoas major muscle of the left side
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Figure 2: T1-weighted axial magnetic resonance imaging section showing contrast enhancement in the psoas major muscle of the left side

Mentions: On re-examining the patient after 15 days, tenderness was elicited in the upper lumbar region. A repeat MRI of the lumbosacral spine was advised which revealed Pott's spine at the L2-3 level with associated edema in the psoas muscle of the affected side [Figures 1 and 2]. The patient was started on antitubercular therapy (ATT) and was relieved of his symptoms in 4 weeks. The patient is still on ATT and is under our follow-up.


Inguinoscrotal pain resistant to conventional treatment.

Jain A, Agarwal A - Indian J Urol (2015 Jan-Mar)

T1-weighted axial magnetic resonance imaging section showing contrast enhancement in the psoas major muscle of the left side
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4300576&req=5

Figure 2: T1-weighted axial magnetic resonance imaging section showing contrast enhancement in the psoas major muscle of the left side
Mentions: On re-examining the patient after 15 days, tenderness was elicited in the upper lumbar region. A repeat MRI of the lumbosacral spine was advised which revealed Pott's spine at the L2-3 level with associated edema in the psoas muscle of the affected side [Figures 1 and 2]. The patient was started on antitubercular therapy (ATT) and was relieved of his symptoms in 4 weeks. The patient is still on ATT and is under our follow-up.

Bottom Line: Inguinoscrotal pain (ISP) is a common complaint that affects almost all age groups.The etiology may be vascular, neurogenic, visceral, muscular or psychological.Most causes of ISP are benign, but Pott's spine as a cause of ISP, when missed, may lead to serious outcomes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesia, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India.

ABSTRACT
Inguinoscrotal pain (ISP) is a common complaint that affects almost all age groups. The etiology may be vascular, neurogenic, visceral, muscular or psychological. Most causes of ISP are benign, but Pott's spine as a cause of ISP, when missed, may lead to serious outcomes.

No MeSH data available.