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The PUFA-enriched fatty acid profiles of some frozen bison from the early Holocene found in the Siberian permafrost.

Guil-Guerrero JL, Rodríguez-García I, Kirillova I, Shidlovskiy F, Ramos-Bueno RP, Savvinov G, Tikhonov A - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: To this end, we have analysed fat from several frozen bison found in the permafrost of Siberia (Russia).Fat samples from two bison showed two well-differenced areas, i.e. brown and white, the latter being saturated fatty acid enriched, corresponding to an intermediate stage of adipocere formation, while the brown ones yielded α-linolenic acid in higher percentages than found in present-day bison.As demonstrated in this work, the subcutaneous fat of bison consumed by Mesolithic hunters contained amounts of n-3 fatty acids in higher quantities than those found in current bison; thus, the subcutaneous fat of bison could have contributed to meet today's recommended daily intake of essential fatty acids for good health in the Mesolithic to a greater extent than previously thought.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Food Technology Division, CeiA3, University of Almería, Almería, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Knowledge concerning the availability of n-3 fatty acids for humans in prehistoric times is highly relevant in order to draw useful conclusions on the healthy dietary habits for present-day humans. To this end, we have analysed fat from several frozen bison found in the permafrost of Siberia (Russia). A total of 3 bison were included in this study, all them very close to the early Holocene (8,000; 8,200; and 9,300 years BP). All samples were analysed by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (GLC-MS) and GLC flame-ionization detection (GLC-FID). Fat samples from two bison showed two well-differenced areas, i.e. brown and white, the latter being saturated fatty acid enriched, corresponding to an intermediate stage of adipocere formation, while the brown ones yielded α-linolenic acid in higher percentages than found in present-day bison. As demonstrated in this work, the subcutaneous fat of bison consumed by Mesolithic hunters contained amounts of n-3 fatty acids in higher quantities than those found in current bison; thus, the subcutaneous fat of bison could have contributed to meet today's recommended daily intake of essential fatty acids for good health in the Mesolithic to a greater extent than previously thought.

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Gas-liquid chromatogram of fatty acid methyl esters from under skin fat from the belly of bison Rauchua.Red GLC from brown fat; green GLC from white lumps. As noted in the chromatogram, oleic acid (C18:1n-9Z) is the main FA component for brown fat, while palmitic acid (C16:0) and stearic acid (C18:0) are the main component for white fat.
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f4: Gas-liquid chromatogram of fatty acid methyl esters from under skin fat from the belly of bison Rauchua.Red GLC from brown fat; green GLC from white lumps. As noted in the chromatogram, oleic acid (C18:1n-9Z) is the main FA component for brown fat, while palmitic acid (C16:0) and stearic acid (C18:0) are the main component for white fat.

Mentions: A chromatogram of the FAs taken from the brown fat under the skin of bison Rauchua (BRb) is plotted in Figure 4, while the mass spectra of a selection of PUFA showing their characteristic fragmentation patterns are displayed in Figure 5. The FA profiles of the animals analysed are shown in Tables 2 and 3.


The PUFA-enriched fatty acid profiles of some frozen bison from the early Holocene found in the Siberian permafrost.

Guil-Guerrero JL, Rodríguez-García I, Kirillova I, Shidlovskiy F, Ramos-Bueno RP, Savvinov G, Tikhonov A - Sci Rep (2015)

Gas-liquid chromatogram of fatty acid methyl esters from under skin fat from the belly of bison Rauchua.Red GLC from brown fat; green GLC from white lumps. As noted in the chromatogram, oleic acid (C18:1n-9Z) is the main FA component for brown fat, while palmitic acid (C16:0) and stearic acid (C18:0) are the main component for white fat.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4300509&req=5

f4: Gas-liquid chromatogram of fatty acid methyl esters from under skin fat from the belly of bison Rauchua.Red GLC from brown fat; green GLC from white lumps. As noted in the chromatogram, oleic acid (C18:1n-9Z) is the main FA component for brown fat, while palmitic acid (C16:0) and stearic acid (C18:0) are the main component for white fat.
Mentions: A chromatogram of the FAs taken from the brown fat under the skin of bison Rauchua (BRb) is plotted in Figure 4, while the mass spectra of a selection of PUFA showing their characteristic fragmentation patterns are displayed in Figure 5. The FA profiles of the animals analysed are shown in Tables 2 and 3.

Bottom Line: To this end, we have analysed fat from several frozen bison found in the permafrost of Siberia (Russia).Fat samples from two bison showed two well-differenced areas, i.e. brown and white, the latter being saturated fatty acid enriched, corresponding to an intermediate stage of adipocere formation, while the brown ones yielded α-linolenic acid in higher percentages than found in present-day bison.As demonstrated in this work, the subcutaneous fat of bison consumed by Mesolithic hunters contained amounts of n-3 fatty acids in higher quantities than those found in current bison; thus, the subcutaneous fat of bison could have contributed to meet today's recommended daily intake of essential fatty acids for good health in the Mesolithic to a greater extent than previously thought.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Food Technology Division, CeiA3, University of Almería, Almería, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Knowledge concerning the availability of n-3 fatty acids for humans in prehistoric times is highly relevant in order to draw useful conclusions on the healthy dietary habits for present-day humans. To this end, we have analysed fat from several frozen bison found in the permafrost of Siberia (Russia). A total of 3 bison were included in this study, all them very close to the early Holocene (8,000; 8,200; and 9,300 years BP). All samples were analysed by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (GLC-MS) and GLC flame-ionization detection (GLC-FID). Fat samples from two bison showed two well-differenced areas, i.e. brown and white, the latter being saturated fatty acid enriched, corresponding to an intermediate stage of adipocere formation, while the brown ones yielded α-linolenic acid in higher percentages than found in present-day bison. As demonstrated in this work, the subcutaneous fat of bison consumed by Mesolithic hunters contained amounts of n-3 fatty acids in higher quantities than those found in current bison; thus, the subcutaneous fat of bison could have contributed to meet today's recommended daily intake of essential fatty acids for good health in the Mesolithic to a greater extent than previously thought.

Show MeSH