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The PUFA-enriched fatty acid profiles of some frozen bison from the early Holocene found in the Siberian permafrost.

Guil-Guerrero JL, Rodríguez-García I, Kirillova I, Shidlovskiy F, Ramos-Bueno RP, Savvinov G, Tikhonov A - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: To this end, we have analysed fat from several frozen bison found in the permafrost of Siberia (Russia).Fat samples from two bison showed two well-differenced areas, i.e. brown and white, the latter being saturated fatty acid enriched, corresponding to an intermediate stage of adipocere formation, while the brown ones yielded α-linolenic acid in higher percentages than found in present-day bison.As demonstrated in this work, the subcutaneous fat of bison consumed by Mesolithic hunters contained amounts of n-3 fatty acids in higher quantities than those found in current bison; thus, the subcutaneous fat of bison could have contributed to meet today's recommended daily intake of essential fatty acids for good health in the Mesolithic to a greater extent than previously thought.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Food Technology Division, CeiA3, University of Almería, Almería, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Knowledge concerning the availability of n-3 fatty acids for humans in prehistoric times is highly relevant in order to draw useful conclusions on the healthy dietary habits for present-day humans. To this end, we have analysed fat from several frozen bison found in the permafrost of Siberia (Russia). A total of 3 bison were included in this study, all them very close to the early Holocene (8,000; 8,200; and 9,300 years BP). All samples were analysed by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (GLC-MS) and GLC flame-ionization detection (GLC-FID). Fat samples from two bison showed two well-differenced areas, i.e. brown and white, the latter being saturated fatty acid enriched, corresponding to an intermediate stage of adipocere formation, while the brown ones yielded α-linolenic acid in higher percentages than found in present-day bison. As demonstrated in this work, the subcutaneous fat of bison consumed by Mesolithic hunters contained amounts of n-3 fatty acids in higher quantities than those found in current bison; thus, the subcutaneous fat of bison could have contributed to meet today's recommended daily intake of essential fatty acids for good health in the Mesolithic to a greater extent than previously thought.

Show MeSH
Fragments of the subcutaneous fat of bison Rauchua.There are light and dark areas, which correspond to different stages of fat conservation. The clear area termed “white”, corresponds to an intermediate state of formation of a structure called “adipocere”, which corresponds to the result of saturation of unsaturated fatty acids. The dark “brown” area is the primeval fat, which contains hairs (H), and the unchanged fatty acids.
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f3: Fragments of the subcutaneous fat of bison Rauchua.There are light and dark areas, which correspond to different stages of fat conservation. The clear area termed “white”, corresponds to an intermediate state of formation of a structure called “adipocere”, which corresponds to the result of saturation of unsaturated fatty acids. The dark “brown” area is the primeval fat, which contains hairs (H), and the unchanged fatty acids.

Mentions: The samples were kept in the freezers of Zoological Institute Russian Academy of Sciences in Saint Petersburg. Sterile conditions were maintained during the dissection procedures and a special drill was used on the frozen carcasses. The samples were taken from the layers under the skin in the best preserved areas (Table 1). Two bison, Yukagir and Rauchua, showed two different coloured areas, i.e. white and brown (Figure 3), which were separately analysed, yielding two well-differenced FA profiles, as discussed below. However, in the baby bison Batagay only white fat was detected.


The PUFA-enriched fatty acid profiles of some frozen bison from the early Holocene found in the Siberian permafrost.

Guil-Guerrero JL, Rodríguez-García I, Kirillova I, Shidlovskiy F, Ramos-Bueno RP, Savvinov G, Tikhonov A - Sci Rep (2015)

Fragments of the subcutaneous fat of bison Rauchua.There are light and dark areas, which correspond to different stages of fat conservation. The clear area termed “white”, corresponds to an intermediate state of formation of a structure called “adipocere”, which corresponds to the result of saturation of unsaturated fatty acids. The dark “brown” area is the primeval fat, which contains hairs (H), and the unchanged fatty acids.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4300509&req=5

f3: Fragments of the subcutaneous fat of bison Rauchua.There are light and dark areas, which correspond to different stages of fat conservation. The clear area termed “white”, corresponds to an intermediate state of formation of a structure called “adipocere”, which corresponds to the result of saturation of unsaturated fatty acids. The dark “brown” area is the primeval fat, which contains hairs (H), and the unchanged fatty acids.
Mentions: The samples were kept in the freezers of Zoological Institute Russian Academy of Sciences in Saint Petersburg. Sterile conditions were maintained during the dissection procedures and a special drill was used on the frozen carcasses. The samples were taken from the layers under the skin in the best preserved areas (Table 1). Two bison, Yukagir and Rauchua, showed two different coloured areas, i.e. white and brown (Figure 3), which were separately analysed, yielding two well-differenced FA profiles, as discussed below. However, in the baby bison Batagay only white fat was detected.

Bottom Line: To this end, we have analysed fat from several frozen bison found in the permafrost of Siberia (Russia).Fat samples from two bison showed two well-differenced areas, i.e. brown and white, the latter being saturated fatty acid enriched, corresponding to an intermediate stage of adipocere formation, while the brown ones yielded α-linolenic acid in higher percentages than found in present-day bison.As demonstrated in this work, the subcutaneous fat of bison consumed by Mesolithic hunters contained amounts of n-3 fatty acids in higher quantities than those found in current bison; thus, the subcutaneous fat of bison could have contributed to meet today's recommended daily intake of essential fatty acids for good health in the Mesolithic to a greater extent than previously thought.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Food Technology Division, CeiA3, University of Almería, Almería, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Knowledge concerning the availability of n-3 fatty acids for humans in prehistoric times is highly relevant in order to draw useful conclusions on the healthy dietary habits for present-day humans. To this end, we have analysed fat from several frozen bison found in the permafrost of Siberia (Russia). A total of 3 bison were included in this study, all them very close to the early Holocene (8,000; 8,200; and 9,300 years BP). All samples were analysed by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (GLC-MS) and GLC flame-ionization detection (GLC-FID). Fat samples from two bison showed two well-differenced areas, i.e. brown and white, the latter being saturated fatty acid enriched, corresponding to an intermediate stage of adipocere formation, while the brown ones yielded α-linolenic acid in higher percentages than found in present-day bison. As demonstrated in this work, the subcutaneous fat of bison consumed by Mesolithic hunters contained amounts of n-3 fatty acids in higher quantities than those found in current bison; thus, the subcutaneous fat of bison could have contributed to meet today's recommended daily intake of essential fatty acids for good health in the Mesolithic to a greater extent than previously thought.

Show MeSH