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The PUFA-enriched fatty acid profiles of some frozen bison from the early Holocene found in the Siberian permafrost.

Guil-Guerrero JL, Rodríguez-García I, Kirillova I, Shidlovskiy F, Ramos-Bueno RP, Savvinov G, Tikhonov A - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: To this end, we have analysed fat from several frozen bison found in the permafrost of Siberia (Russia).Fat samples from two bison showed two well-differenced areas, i.e. brown and white, the latter being saturated fatty acid enriched, corresponding to an intermediate stage of adipocere formation, while the brown ones yielded α-linolenic acid in higher percentages than found in present-day bison.As demonstrated in this work, the subcutaneous fat of bison consumed by Mesolithic hunters contained amounts of n-3 fatty acids in higher quantities than those found in current bison; thus, the subcutaneous fat of bison could have contributed to meet today's recommended daily intake of essential fatty acids for good health in the Mesolithic to a greater extent than previously thought.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Food Technology Division, CeiA3, University of Almería, Almería, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Knowledge concerning the availability of n-3 fatty acids for humans in prehistoric times is highly relevant in order to draw useful conclusions on the healthy dietary habits for present-day humans. To this end, we have analysed fat from several frozen bison found in the permafrost of Siberia (Russia). A total of 3 bison were included in this study, all them very close to the early Holocene (8,000; 8,200; and 9,300 years BP). All samples were analysed by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (GLC-MS) and GLC flame-ionization detection (GLC-FID). Fat samples from two bison showed two well-differenced areas, i.e. brown and white, the latter being saturated fatty acid enriched, corresponding to an intermediate stage of adipocere formation, while the brown ones yielded α-linolenic acid in higher percentages than found in present-day bison. As demonstrated in this work, the subcutaneous fat of bison consumed by Mesolithic hunters contained amounts of n-3 fatty acids in higher quantities than those found in current bison; thus, the subcutaneous fat of bison could have contributed to meet today's recommended daily intake of essential fatty acids for good health in the Mesolithic to a greater extent than previously thought.

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Major Late Pleistocene/early Holocene archaeological sites of north-eastern Siberia.The human remains are marked with the image of an archer, while the localities of the bison found frozen in the permafrost are marked with bison petroglyphs19. Map and drawings created with Corel Draw X3 software.
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f1: Major Late Pleistocene/early Holocene archaeological sites of north-eastern Siberia.The human remains are marked with the image of an archer, while the localities of the bison found frozen in the permafrost are marked with bison petroglyphs19. Map and drawings created with Corel Draw X3 software.

Mentions: A total of 3 specimens of frozen bison (B. priscus) from Siberia (Figure 1) were included in this study (Table 1), i.e. a baby bison from Batagay (bison Batagay), a complete body of an adult male from the Yuka region (bison Yukagir; Figure 2), and a bison from Rauchua river (bison Rauchua), which were very close in time, all from the early Holocene (8,200; 9,300; and 8,000 years BP, respectively78). Permission was received to examine the relevant specimens from museum collections. Samples from the frozen carcass of bison Rauchua were donated by the Ice Age museum in Moscow; baby bison Batagay by the Museum of Mammoth, Institute of applied ecology of the North, North-eastern federal University in Yakutsk; and bison Yukagir from by the Yakutian Academy of Sciences, Yakutsk (all them in Russian Federation).


The PUFA-enriched fatty acid profiles of some frozen bison from the early Holocene found in the Siberian permafrost.

Guil-Guerrero JL, Rodríguez-García I, Kirillova I, Shidlovskiy F, Ramos-Bueno RP, Savvinov G, Tikhonov A - Sci Rep (2015)

Major Late Pleistocene/early Holocene archaeological sites of north-eastern Siberia.The human remains are marked with the image of an archer, while the localities of the bison found frozen in the permafrost are marked with bison petroglyphs19. Map and drawings created with Corel Draw X3 software.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4300509&req=5

f1: Major Late Pleistocene/early Holocene archaeological sites of north-eastern Siberia.The human remains are marked with the image of an archer, while the localities of the bison found frozen in the permafrost are marked with bison petroglyphs19. Map and drawings created with Corel Draw X3 software.
Mentions: A total of 3 specimens of frozen bison (B. priscus) from Siberia (Figure 1) were included in this study (Table 1), i.e. a baby bison from Batagay (bison Batagay), a complete body of an adult male from the Yuka region (bison Yukagir; Figure 2), and a bison from Rauchua river (bison Rauchua), which were very close in time, all from the early Holocene (8,200; 9,300; and 8,000 years BP, respectively78). Permission was received to examine the relevant specimens from museum collections. Samples from the frozen carcass of bison Rauchua were donated by the Ice Age museum in Moscow; baby bison Batagay by the Museum of Mammoth, Institute of applied ecology of the North, North-eastern federal University in Yakutsk; and bison Yukagir from by the Yakutian Academy of Sciences, Yakutsk (all them in Russian Federation).

Bottom Line: To this end, we have analysed fat from several frozen bison found in the permafrost of Siberia (Russia).Fat samples from two bison showed two well-differenced areas, i.e. brown and white, the latter being saturated fatty acid enriched, corresponding to an intermediate stage of adipocere formation, while the brown ones yielded α-linolenic acid in higher percentages than found in present-day bison.As demonstrated in this work, the subcutaneous fat of bison consumed by Mesolithic hunters contained amounts of n-3 fatty acids in higher quantities than those found in current bison; thus, the subcutaneous fat of bison could have contributed to meet today's recommended daily intake of essential fatty acids for good health in the Mesolithic to a greater extent than previously thought.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Food Technology Division, CeiA3, University of Almería, Almería, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Knowledge concerning the availability of n-3 fatty acids for humans in prehistoric times is highly relevant in order to draw useful conclusions on the healthy dietary habits for present-day humans. To this end, we have analysed fat from several frozen bison found in the permafrost of Siberia (Russia). A total of 3 bison were included in this study, all them very close to the early Holocene (8,000; 8,200; and 9,300 years BP). All samples were analysed by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (GLC-MS) and GLC flame-ionization detection (GLC-FID). Fat samples from two bison showed two well-differenced areas, i.e. brown and white, the latter being saturated fatty acid enriched, corresponding to an intermediate stage of adipocere formation, while the brown ones yielded α-linolenic acid in higher percentages than found in present-day bison. As demonstrated in this work, the subcutaneous fat of bison consumed by Mesolithic hunters contained amounts of n-3 fatty acids in higher quantities than those found in current bison; thus, the subcutaneous fat of bison could have contributed to meet today's recommended daily intake of essential fatty acids for good health in the Mesolithic to a greater extent than previously thought.

Show MeSH