Limits...
Fish oil supplements in New Zealand are highly oxidised and do not meet label content of n-3 PUFA.

Albert BB, Derraik JG, Cameron-Smith D, Hofman PL, Tumanov S, Villas-Boas SG, Garg ML, Cutfield WS - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Almost all fish oil supplements available in the New Zealand market contain concentrations of EPA and DHA considerably lower than claimed by labels.Importantly, the majority of supplements tested exceeded the recommended indices of oxidative markers.Surprisingly, best-before date, cost, country of origin, and exclusivity were all poor markers of supplement quality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

ABSTRACT
We evaluated the quality and content of fish oil supplements in New Zealand. All encapsulated fish oil supplements marketed in New Zealand were eligible for inclusion. Fatty acid content was measured by gas chromatography. Peroxide values (PV) and anisidine values (AV) were measured, and total oxidation values (Totox) calculated. Only 3 of 32 fish oil supplements contained quantities of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) that were equal or higher than labelled content, with most products tested (69%) containing <67%. The vast majority of supplements exceeded recommended levels of oxidation markers. 83% products exceeded the recommended PV levels, 25% exceeded AV thresholds, and 50% exceeded recommended Totox levels. Only 8% met the international recommendations, not exceeding any of these indices. Almost all fish oil supplements available in the New Zealand market contain concentrations of EPA and DHA considerably lower than claimed by labels. Importantly, the majority of supplements tested exceeded the recommended indices of oxidative markers. Surprisingly, best-before date, cost, country of origin, and exclusivity were all poor markers of supplement quality.

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The actual n-3 PUFA content (EPA + DHA) contained in individual retail fish oil products in relation to the claimed content (dotted line).
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f1: The actual n-3 PUFA content (EPA + DHA) contained in individual retail fish oil products in relation to the claimed content (dotted line).

Mentions: The total oil content of individual capsules exceeded 97% of the labelled oil content for all supplements tested (Table 1). However, there was a marked disparity between the label-claimed content of EPA + DHA and the actual capsule content of these fatty acids (Table 1; Figure 1), with supplements containing on average 68% (SD = 23%) of the claimed content. Only 3 of the 32 oils tested contained a quantity of EPA + DHA that was equal to or higher than that claimed by the label, with more than two-thirds of supplements tested (22; 69%) containing less than 67% (Table 1; Figure 1). Two supplements contained approximately one third of the label concentrations of EPA + DHA (Table 1; Figure 1).


Fish oil supplements in New Zealand are highly oxidised and do not meet label content of n-3 PUFA.

Albert BB, Derraik JG, Cameron-Smith D, Hofman PL, Tumanov S, Villas-Boas SG, Garg ML, Cutfield WS - Sci Rep (2015)

The actual n-3 PUFA content (EPA + DHA) contained in individual retail fish oil products in relation to the claimed content (dotted line).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4300506&req=5

f1: The actual n-3 PUFA content (EPA + DHA) contained in individual retail fish oil products in relation to the claimed content (dotted line).
Mentions: The total oil content of individual capsules exceeded 97% of the labelled oil content for all supplements tested (Table 1). However, there was a marked disparity between the label-claimed content of EPA + DHA and the actual capsule content of these fatty acids (Table 1; Figure 1), with supplements containing on average 68% (SD = 23%) of the claimed content. Only 3 of the 32 oils tested contained a quantity of EPA + DHA that was equal to or higher than that claimed by the label, with more than two-thirds of supplements tested (22; 69%) containing less than 67% (Table 1; Figure 1). Two supplements contained approximately one third of the label concentrations of EPA + DHA (Table 1; Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Almost all fish oil supplements available in the New Zealand market contain concentrations of EPA and DHA considerably lower than claimed by labels.Importantly, the majority of supplements tested exceeded the recommended indices of oxidative markers.Surprisingly, best-before date, cost, country of origin, and exclusivity were all poor markers of supplement quality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

ABSTRACT
We evaluated the quality and content of fish oil supplements in New Zealand. All encapsulated fish oil supplements marketed in New Zealand were eligible for inclusion. Fatty acid content was measured by gas chromatography. Peroxide values (PV) and anisidine values (AV) were measured, and total oxidation values (Totox) calculated. Only 3 of 32 fish oil supplements contained quantities of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) that were equal or higher than labelled content, with most products tested (69%) containing <67%. The vast majority of supplements exceeded recommended levels of oxidation markers. 83% products exceeded the recommended PV levels, 25% exceeded AV thresholds, and 50% exceeded recommended Totox levels. Only 8% met the international recommendations, not exceeding any of these indices. Almost all fish oil supplements available in the New Zealand market contain concentrations of EPA and DHA considerably lower than claimed by labels. Importantly, the majority of supplements tested exceeded the recommended indices of oxidative markers. Surprisingly, best-before date, cost, country of origin, and exclusivity were all poor markers of supplement quality.

Show MeSH