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Autism cornered: network analyses reveal mechanisms of autism spectrum disorders.

Auffray C - Mol. Syst. Biol. (2014)

Bottom Line: Despite a wealth of behavioral, cognitive,biological, and genetic studies, the causes of autism have remained largely unknown.In their recent work, Snyder and colleagues(Li et al, 2014) use a systems biology approach and shed light on the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying autism, thus opening novel avenues forunderstanding the disease and developing potential treatments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: European Institute for Systems Biology & Medicine CNRS-ENS-UCBL Université de Lyon, Lyon, France.

ABSTRACT
Despite a wealth of behavioral, cognitive,biological, and genetic studies, the causes of autism have remained largely unknown.In their recent work, Snyder and colleagues(Li et al, 2014) use a systems biology approach and shed light on the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying autism, thus opening novel avenues forunderstanding the disease and developing potential treatments.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Network analyses reveal a functional module linked to autismThe human protein interactome was modularized by topological decomposition. ASD-associated modules were identified based on the presence of ASD-related genes. Validation analyses using newly generated and existing exome/genome sequencing data indicated enrichment for rare nonsynonymous mutations in the ASD-related module #13. Functional characterization of the module by network and transcriptome analyses indicated the corpus callosum as a potential tissue of origin of ASD and provided evidence for a function of the module in oligodendrocyte maturation (MRI image of the corpus callosum: Allen Institute of Brain Science).
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fig01: Network analyses reveal a functional module linked to autismThe human protein interactome was modularized by topological decomposition. ASD-associated modules were identified based on the presence of ASD-related genes. Validation analyses using newly generated and existing exome/genome sequencing data indicated enrichment for rare nonsynonymous mutations in the ASD-related module #13. Functional characterization of the module by network and transcriptome analyses indicated the corpus callosum as a potential tissue of origin of ASD and provided evidence for a function of the module in oligodendrocyte maturation (MRI image of the corpus callosum: Allen Institute of Brain Science).

Mentions: This is the route taken by Snyder and colleagues (Li et al, 2014) in a bold attempt to leverage a number of rich sources of data and knowledge and to complement them with relevant additional measurements to unravel the molecular networks of ASD (Fig1). They first curated the human protein interactome through co-expression analysis and by topological decomposition they identified over 800 modular components. These modules were examined for the presence of the 383 ASD-related genes reported in the literature, thus identifying a number of modules highly enriched in ASD-related genes, each of which represents a working hypothesis worth further exploration. They then focused their attention on a module of 119 genes (module #13) enriched in ASD-related genes, and by comparing whole genome or exome sequences of 25 ASD patients to those of 4 control subjects, they detected 113 nonsynonymous mutations in 38 genes in this module, 28 of which are associated with ASD for the first time.


Autism cornered: network analyses reveal mechanisms of autism spectrum disorders.

Auffray C - Mol. Syst. Biol. (2014)

Network analyses reveal a functional module linked to autismThe human protein interactome was modularized by topological decomposition. ASD-associated modules were identified based on the presence of ASD-related genes. Validation analyses using newly generated and existing exome/genome sequencing data indicated enrichment for rare nonsynonymous mutations in the ASD-related module #13. Functional characterization of the module by network and transcriptome analyses indicated the corpus callosum as a potential tissue of origin of ASD and provided evidence for a function of the module in oligodendrocyte maturation (MRI image of the corpus callosum: Allen Institute of Brain Science).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4300496&req=5

fig01: Network analyses reveal a functional module linked to autismThe human protein interactome was modularized by topological decomposition. ASD-associated modules were identified based on the presence of ASD-related genes. Validation analyses using newly generated and existing exome/genome sequencing data indicated enrichment for rare nonsynonymous mutations in the ASD-related module #13. Functional characterization of the module by network and transcriptome analyses indicated the corpus callosum as a potential tissue of origin of ASD and provided evidence for a function of the module in oligodendrocyte maturation (MRI image of the corpus callosum: Allen Institute of Brain Science).
Mentions: This is the route taken by Snyder and colleagues (Li et al, 2014) in a bold attempt to leverage a number of rich sources of data and knowledge and to complement them with relevant additional measurements to unravel the molecular networks of ASD (Fig1). They first curated the human protein interactome through co-expression analysis and by topological decomposition they identified over 800 modular components. These modules were examined for the presence of the 383 ASD-related genes reported in the literature, thus identifying a number of modules highly enriched in ASD-related genes, each of which represents a working hypothesis worth further exploration. They then focused their attention on a module of 119 genes (module #13) enriched in ASD-related genes, and by comparing whole genome or exome sequences of 25 ASD patients to those of 4 control subjects, they detected 113 nonsynonymous mutations in 38 genes in this module, 28 of which are associated with ASD for the first time.

Bottom Line: Despite a wealth of behavioral, cognitive,biological, and genetic studies, the causes of autism have remained largely unknown.In their recent work, Snyder and colleagues(Li et al, 2014) use a systems biology approach and shed light on the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying autism, thus opening novel avenues forunderstanding the disease and developing potential treatments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: European Institute for Systems Biology & Medicine CNRS-ENS-UCBL Université de Lyon, Lyon, France.

ABSTRACT
Despite a wealth of behavioral, cognitive,biological, and genetic studies, the causes of autism have remained largely unknown.In their recent work, Snyder and colleagues(Li et al, 2014) use a systems biology approach and shed light on the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying autism, thus opening novel avenues forunderstanding the disease and developing potential treatments.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus