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Loss of growth homeostasis by genetic decoupling of cell division from biomass growth: implication for size control mechanisms.

Schmidt-Glenewinkel H, Barkai N - Mol. Syst. Biol. (2014)

Bottom Line: This was achieved by modulating glucose influx independently of external glucose.Division rate followed glucose influx, while volume growth was largely defined by external glucose.We present a class of size control models explaining the observed breakdowns of growth homeostasis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Molecular Genetics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel.

No MeSH data available.


A model for size control explaining the loss of homeostasis through type I and type II arrests
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fig04: A model for size control explaining the loss of homeostasis through type I and type II arrests

Mentions: To examine the possible implications of our results for models of size control, we first revisited the simplified mathematical description of cell growth explaining why size control mechanisms are required to maintain growth homeostasis. Consider exponentially growing cells with specific growth rate λ and cell cycle duration T. A cell i born at a size Vi will generate a progeny of size Vi + 1 =Vi exp(λT)/n (Fig4A), where n denotes the division ratio between the two progenies (n = 2 for symmetric division and n > 2 for budding yeast daughter cells). Denoting v = log(V), we can write1


Loss of growth homeostasis by genetic decoupling of cell division from biomass growth: implication for size control mechanisms.

Schmidt-Glenewinkel H, Barkai N - Mol. Syst. Biol. (2014)

A model for size control explaining the loss of homeostasis through type I and type II arrests
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4300492&req=5

fig04: A model for size control explaining the loss of homeostasis through type I and type II arrests
Mentions: To examine the possible implications of our results for models of size control, we first revisited the simplified mathematical description of cell growth explaining why size control mechanisms are required to maintain growth homeostasis. Consider exponentially growing cells with specific growth rate λ and cell cycle duration T. A cell i born at a size Vi will generate a progeny of size Vi + 1 =Vi exp(λT)/n (Fig4A), where n denotes the division ratio between the two progenies (n = 2 for symmetric division and n > 2 for budding yeast daughter cells). Denoting v = log(V), we can write1

Bottom Line: This was achieved by modulating glucose influx independently of external glucose.Division rate followed glucose influx, while volume growth was largely defined by external glucose.We present a class of size control models explaining the observed breakdowns of growth homeostasis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Molecular Genetics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel.

No MeSH data available.