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Loss of growth homeostasis by genetic decoupling of cell division from biomass growth: implication for size control mechanisms.

Schmidt-Glenewinkel H, Barkai N - Mol. Syst. Biol. (2014)

Bottom Line: This was achieved by modulating glucose influx independently of external glucose.Division rate followed glucose influx, while volume growth was largely defined by external glucose.We present a class of size control models explaining the observed breakdowns of growth homeostasis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Molecular Genetics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel.

No MeSH data available.


Conditions leading to the loss of balanced growth
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fig03: Conditions leading to the loss of balanced growth

Mentions: To examine this prediction, we expressed the intermediate affinity transporter HXT4 at high induction levels and varied the external glucose (FigA). At intermediate glucose concentration (0.1%, where maximal influx is expected Reifenberger et al, 1997), cells maintained steady-state growth, with division time and cell size similar to that of wild-type (Fig3B and C, 0.1% glucose). In contrast, when grown in 2% glucose medium, cells continuously increased in size until arresting as large cells, consistent with our predictions (Fig3B and C, 2% glucose; Supplementary Movie S1).


Loss of growth homeostasis by genetic decoupling of cell division from biomass growth: implication for size control mechanisms.

Schmidt-Glenewinkel H, Barkai N - Mol. Syst. Biol. (2014)

Conditions leading to the loss of balanced growth
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4300492&req=5

fig03: Conditions leading to the loss of balanced growth
Mentions: To examine this prediction, we expressed the intermediate affinity transporter HXT4 at high induction levels and varied the external glucose (FigA). At intermediate glucose concentration (0.1%, where maximal influx is expected Reifenberger et al, 1997), cells maintained steady-state growth, with division time and cell size similar to that of wild-type (Fig3B and C, 0.1% glucose). In contrast, when grown in 2% glucose medium, cells continuously increased in size until arresting as large cells, consistent with our predictions (Fig3B and C, 2% glucose; Supplementary Movie S1).

Bottom Line: This was achieved by modulating glucose influx independently of external glucose.Division rate followed glucose influx, while volume growth was largely defined by external glucose.We present a class of size control models explaining the observed breakdowns of growth homeostasis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Molecular Genetics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel.

No MeSH data available.