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Loss of growth homeostasis by genetic decoupling of cell division from biomass growth: implication for size control mechanisms.

Schmidt-Glenewinkel H, Barkai N - Mol. Syst. Biol. (2014)

Bottom Line: This was achieved by modulating glucose influx independently of external glucose.Division rate followed glucose influx, while volume growth was largely defined by external glucose.We present a class of size control models explaining the observed breakdowns of growth homeostasis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Molecular Genetics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel.

No MeSH data available.


External glucose regulates cell size independently of glucose influx
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fig01: External glucose regulates cell size independently of glucose influx

Mentions: Glucose is a major carbon source of budding yeast. It effects growth rate directly, by providing an essential nutrient, and also indirectly, by binding membrane receptors or intracellular regulatory proteins (Schneper et al, 2004; Gancedo, 2008; Zaman et al, 2008; Busti et al, 2010; Kim et al, 2013). We characterized how glucose affects cell division and cell size using a microfluidics device, which enables following individual cells over a long time while maintaining constant media conditions. Cells were pre-grown in maltose to log-phase and were then transferred to the device and provided with SC media complemented with a defined glucose concentration. As expected (Alberghina et al, 1998; Busti et al, 2010), wild-type cells adapted to the transfer within 1–2 generations and maintained a constant size and division rate throughout the experiment (Fig1A; Supplementary Figs S1A and S2). This steady-state growth was observed for a wide range of glucose concentrations, ranging from 0.01 to 2%. Consistent with previous results (Johnston et al, 1979; Porro et al, 2003), division time and cell size were tightly coordinated with glucose levels (FigC; Supplementary Fig S1B).


Loss of growth homeostasis by genetic decoupling of cell division from biomass growth: implication for size control mechanisms.

Schmidt-Glenewinkel H, Barkai N - Mol. Syst. Biol. (2014)

External glucose regulates cell size independently of glucose influx
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4300492&req=5

fig01: External glucose regulates cell size independently of glucose influx
Mentions: Glucose is a major carbon source of budding yeast. It effects growth rate directly, by providing an essential nutrient, and also indirectly, by binding membrane receptors or intracellular regulatory proteins (Schneper et al, 2004; Gancedo, 2008; Zaman et al, 2008; Busti et al, 2010; Kim et al, 2013). We characterized how glucose affects cell division and cell size using a microfluidics device, which enables following individual cells over a long time while maintaining constant media conditions. Cells were pre-grown in maltose to log-phase and were then transferred to the device and provided with SC media complemented with a defined glucose concentration. As expected (Alberghina et al, 1998; Busti et al, 2010), wild-type cells adapted to the transfer within 1–2 generations and maintained a constant size and division rate throughout the experiment (Fig1A; Supplementary Figs S1A and S2). This steady-state growth was observed for a wide range of glucose concentrations, ranging from 0.01 to 2%. Consistent with previous results (Johnston et al, 1979; Porro et al, 2003), division time and cell size were tightly coordinated with glucose levels (FigC; Supplementary Fig S1B).

Bottom Line: This was achieved by modulating glucose influx independently of external glucose.Division rate followed glucose influx, while volume growth was largely defined by external glucose.We present a class of size control models explaining the observed breakdowns of growth homeostasis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Molecular Genetics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel.

No MeSH data available.