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Periosteal osteoblastoma of the pelvis: a rare case.

Patel S, Agrawal A, Maheshwari R, Chauhan VD - Iran J Med Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: The unusual location and inconclusive radiographic findings with diffused diagnostic evidences delays the management of benign osteoblastoma.Peroperatively, the tumor appeared as oval, reddish brown, bony hard mass lying just over the cortex of the right pubic ramus and not breaching the cortex.Histopathological study revealed an osteoid rich lesion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedics, Himalayan Institute of Medical Sciences, Swami Ram Nagar, Dehradun, Uttarakhand, India.

ABSTRACT
Among the rare bone tumors, the osteoblastoma is a fascinating tumor. The rarity, the predisposition to occur in any bone and the diagnostic dilemma makes this infrequent tumor interesting. It is sporadically reported in the literature and what is rarer is its occurrence in the pelvis. The unusual location and inconclusive radiographic findings with diffused diagnostic evidences delays the management of benign osteoblastoma. We encountered a patient with benign osteoblastoma of the pubic ramus of right side. An excisional biopsy was performed. Peroperatively, the tumor appeared as oval, reddish brown, bony hard mass lying just over the cortex of the right pubic ramus and not breaching the cortex. Histopathological study revealed an osteoid rich lesion. Its presence in pubis must not be ignored and periosteal osteoblastoma should be considered as a differential diagnosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A) Microphotograph (×10, hematoxylin and eosin stain) showing numerous osteoid trabeculae of variable size, shape and separated by vascularised cellular stroma. 3) Microphotograph (×10, hematoxylin and eosin stain) showing some non-calcified osteoid. All are surrounded by plump osteoblast and the stroma is highly vascularised
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Figure 3: A) Microphotograph (×10, hematoxylin and eosin stain) showing numerous osteoid trabeculae of variable size, shape and separated by vascularised cellular stroma. 3) Microphotograph (×10, hematoxylin and eosin stain) showing some non-calcified osteoid. All are surrounded by plump osteoblast and the stroma is highly vascularised

Mentions: Histopathological study revealed an osteoid rich lesion. The osteoid trabeculae were variable in size and thickness and were covered by plump osteoblast, which were also seen as a collection in between the osteoid trabeculae. Some osteoid was partially calcified. The inter-osteoid space contained many dilated capillaries, a few scattered osteoclast, and focal free collection of blood. Mitotic figures were absent and there was no necrosis. No cytological evidence of malignancy was noted. Normal periosteum and bone was seen on one side of the lesion without any evidence of infiltration (figure 3A, 3B).


Periosteal osteoblastoma of the pelvis: a rare case.

Patel S, Agrawal A, Maheshwari R, Chauhan VD - Iran J Med Sci (2015)

A) Microphotograph (×10, hematoxylin and eosin stain) showing numerous osteoid trabeculae of variable size, shape and separated by vascularised cellular stroma. 3) Microphotograph (×10, hematoxylin and eosin stain) showing some non-calcified osteoid. All are surrounded by plump osteoblast and the stroma is highly vascularised
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4300486&req=5

Figure 3: A) Microphotograph (×10, hematoxylin and eosin stain) showing numerous osteoid trabeculae of variable size, shape and separated by vascularised cellular stroma. 3) Microphotograph (×10, hematoxylin and eosin stain) showing some non-calcified osteoid. All are surrounded by plump osteoblast and the stroma is highly vascularised
Mentions: Histopathological study revealed an osteoid rich lesion. The osteoid trabeculae were variable in size and thickness and were covered by plump osteoblast, which were also seen as a collection in between the osteoid trabeculae. Some osteoid was partially calcified. The inter-osteoid space contained many dilated capillaries, a few scattered osteoclast, and focal free collection of blood. Mitotic figures were absent and there was no necrosis. No cytological evidence of malignancy was noted. Normal periosteum and bone was seen on one side of the lesion without any evidence of infiltration (figure 3A, 3B).

Bottom Line: The unusual location and inconclusive radiographic findings with diffused diagnostic evidences delays the management of benign osteoblastoma.Peroperatively, the tumor appeared as oval, reddish brown, bony hard mass lying just over the cortex of the right pubic ramus and not breaching the cortex.Histopathological study revealed an osteoid rich lesion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedics, Himalayan Institute of Medical Sciences, Swami Ram Nagar, Dehradun, Uttarakhand, India.

ABSTRACT
Among the rare bone tumors, the osteoblastoma is a fascinating tumor. The rarity, the predisposition to occur in any bone and the diagnostic dilemma makes this infrequent tumor interesting. It is sporadically reported in the literature and what is rarer is its occurrence in the pelvis. The unusual location and inconclusive radiographic findings with diffused diagnostic evidences delays the management of benign osteoblastoma. We encountered a patient with benign osteoblastoma of the pubic ramus of right side. An excisional biopsy was performed. Peroperatively, the tumor appeared as oval, reddish brown, bony hard mass lying just over the cortex of the right pubic ramus and not breaching the cortex. Histopathological study revealed an osteoid rich lesion. Its presence in pubis must not be ignored and periosteal osteoblastoma should be considered as a differential diagnosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus