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The effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy in treating a case of obsessive compulsive disorder.

Vakili Y, Gharraee B - Iran J Psychiatry (2014)

Bottom Line: The treatment led to reductions in symptoms of OCD, depression and anxiety.Gains were maintained at follow-ups.The treatment approach appears to be effective in the treatment of OCD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: North Khorasan University of Medical Sciences, Bojnord, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) in treating obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD).

Method: In a single-subject experiment trial, the treatment process was carried out on a 39-year old male subject. The patient satisfied the DSM-IV-TR criteria for OCD and was assessed for pre-duration and post treatment. The scales used in this study included: The Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale(Y-BOCS), Beck Depression Inventory-II-second edition (BDI-II), and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). In addition, all scales were again completed by the subject at 1-month, 3-months, and 6-months follow-ups.

Results: The treatment led to reductions in symptoms of OCD, depression and anxiety. Gains were maintained at follow-ups.

Conclusion: The treatment approach appears to be effective in the treatment of OCD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

OCD symptoms severity, depression, and anxiety scores for patient during baseline, treatment, and follow-upu.
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Figure 1: OCD symptoms severity, depression, and anxiety scores for patient during baseline, treatment, and follow-upu.

Mentions: The patient was a 39-year-old divorced male, with an educational level of high school diploma, who was admitted to Tehran Psychiatry Institute for resistant OCD and was referred for ACT by the attending psychiatrist. His problem started at the age of 23, and the duration of his OCD symptoms was 16 years. The patient was evaluated by administering the SCID-I for Axis I disorders and SCID-II for Axis II disorders. The resulting evaluation confirmed the diagnosis of OCD; no psychiatric comorbidity was observed. His primary obsessions included harming others, intrusive thoughts (The belief that he was “damned to hell” by God because he had sex with a prostitute. Also, he believed that God may not forgive such sins, and these obsessions triggered feeling anger. Primary compulsions consisted of checking and washing rituals. The disorder had deteriorated his social and interpersonal relations. He underwent several different kinds of SSRIs, including full doses of sertraline and fluoxetine. The mentioned medications did not affect his obsessive compulsive symptoms. At the time, ACT was initiated for the patient and he received sertraline (100mg) daily. Sertraline continued during the assessment period. Although the mentioned medication indicated a positive outcome, the main effect was due to the ACT illustrated in the baseline treatment (Figure 1).


The effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy in treating a case of obsessive compulsive disorder.

Vakili Y, Gharraee B - Iran J Psychiatry (2014)

OCD symptoms severity, depression, and anxiety scores for patient during baseline, treatment, and follow-upu.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4300464&req=5

Figure 1: OCD symptoms severity, depression, and anxiety scores for patient during baseline, treatment, and follow-upu.
Mentions: The patient was a 39-year-old divorced male, with an educational level of high school diploma, who was admitted to Tehran Psychiatry Institute for resistant OCD and was referred for ACT by the attending psychiatrist. His problem started at the age of 23, and the duration of his OCD symptoms was 16 years. The patient was evaluated by administering the SCID-I for Axis I disorders and SCID-II for Axis II disorders. The resulting evaluation confirmed the diagnosis of OCD; no psychiatric comorbidity was observed. His primary obsessions included harming others, intrusive thoughts (The belief that he was “damned to hell” by God because he had sex with a prostitute. Also, he believed that God may not forgive such sins, and these obsessions triggered feeling anger. Primary compulsions consisted of checking and washing rituals. The disorder had deteriorated his social and interpersonal relations. He underwent several different kinds of SSRIs, including full doses of sertraline and fluoxetine. The mentioned medications did not affect his obsessive compulsive symptoms. At the time, ACT was initiated for the patient and he received sertraline (100mg) daily. Sertraline continued during the assessment period. Although the mentioned medication indicated a positive outcome, the main effect was due to the ACT illustrated in the baseline treatment (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: The treatment led to reductions in symptoms of OCD, depression and anxiety.Gains were maintained at follow-ups.The treatment approach appears to be effective in the treatment of OCD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: North Khorasan University of Medical Sciences, Bojnord, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) in treating obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD).

Method: In a single-subject experiment trial, the treatment process was carried out on a 39-year old male subject. The patient satisfied the DSM-IV-TR criteria for OCD and was assessed for pre-duration and post treatment. The scales used in this study included: The Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale(Y-BOCS), Beck Depression Inventory-II-second edition (BDI-II), and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). In addition, all scales were again completed by the subject at 1-month, 3-months, and 6-months follow-ups.

Results: The treatment led to reductions in symptoms of OCD, depression and anxiety. Gains were maintained at follow-ups.

Conclusion: The treatment approach appears to be effective in the treatment of OCD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus