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Noninvasive evaluation of left ventricular force-frequency relationships by measuring carotid arterial wave intensity during exercise stress.

Tanaka M, Sugawara M, Ogasawara Y, Suminoe I, Izumi T, Niki K, Kajiya F - J Med Ultrason (2001) (2014)

Bottom Line: We first confirmed that HR increased linearly with an increase in work load in each subject (r (2) = 0.95 ± 0.04).The slope of the WD1-HR relation ranged 0.30-2.20 [m/s(3) (beat/min)].These data should show the potential usefulness of the FFR in the context of cardiac rehabilitation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Health Care Sciences, Himeji Dokkyo University, 7-2-1 Kamiohno, Himeji, Hyogo 670-8524 Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background and purpose: Estimation of the contractility of the left ventricle during exercise is important in drawing up a protocol of cardiac rehabilitation. It has been demonstrated that color Doppler- and echo tracking-derived carotid arterial wave intensity is a sensitive index of global left ventricular (LV) contractility. We assessed the feasibility of measuring carotid arterial wave intensity and determining force-frequency (contractility-heart rate) relations (FFRs) during exercise totally noninvasively.

Methods: We measured carotid arterial wave intensity with a combined color Doppler and echo tracking system in 25 healthy young male volunteers (age 20.8 ± 1.2 years) at rest and during exercise. FFRs were constructed by plotting the maximum value of wave intensity (WD1) against heart rate (HR).

Results: We first confirmed that HR increased linearly with an increase in work load in each subject (r (2) = 0.95 ± 0.04). WD1 increased linearly with an increase in HR. The goodness-of-fit of the regression line of WD1 on HR in each subject was very high (r (2) = 0.48-0.94, p < 0.0001, respectively). The slope of the WD1-HR relation ranged 0.30-2.20 [m/s(3) (beat/min)].

Conclusions: Global LV FFRs can be generated in healthy young volunteers with an entirely noninvasive combination of exercise and wave intensity. These data should show the potential usefulness of the FFR in the context of cardiac rehabilitation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Measurements of diameter-change waveform and blood velocity. Left Long axis view of the common carotid artery and ultrasound beams. By setting the tracking positions displayed as small pink bars on the echo tracking beam (line A) to arterial walls, echo tracking automatically starts. The blood flow velocity averaged along the Doppler beam (line B) crossing the artery was measured using range-gated color Doppler signals. Right The diameter-change waveform, which is calculated by subtracting the distance to the near wall from that to the far wall, is displayed on the M-mode view. The blood flow velocity waveform is also displayed on the M-mode view
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Fig3: Measurements of diameter-change waveform and blood velocity. Left Long axis view of the common carotid artery and ultrasound beams. By setting the tracking positions displayed as small pink bars on the echo tracking beam (line A) to arterial walls, echo tracking automatically starts. The blood flow velocity averaged along the Doppler beam (line B) crossing the artery was measured using range-gated color Doppler signals. Right The diameter-change waveform, which is calculated by subtracting the distance to the near wall from that to the far wall, is displayed on the M-mode view. The blood flow velocity waveform is also displayed on the M-mode view

Mentions: According to Eq. 4, the maximum value of carotid arterial WD during a cardiac cycle (WD1) correlates with the maximum value of WI (W1). Therefore, WD1 correlates with peak dP/dt as W1 does (Fig. 1). WD is obtained by measuring U and D without measuring upper arm pressure (Fig. 3), which is easier to perform during exercise. The details of the method of measurements were described elsewhere [11].Fig. 2


Noninvasive evaluation of left ventricular force-frequency relationships by measuring carotid arterial wave intensity during exercise stress.

Tanaka M, Sugawara M, Ogasawara Y, Suminoe I, Izumi T, Niki K, Kajiya F - J Med Ultrason (2001) (2014)

Measurements of diameter-change waveform and blood velocity. Left Long axis view of the common carotid artery and ultrasound beams. By setting the tracking positions displayed as small pink bars on the echo tracking beam (line A) to arterial walls, echo tracking automatically starts. The blood flow velocity averaged along the Doppler beam (line B) crossing the artery was measured using range-gated color Doppler signals. Right The diameter-change waveform, which is calculated by subtracting the distance to the near wall from that to the far wall, is displayed on the M-mode view. The blood flow velocity waveform is also displayed on the M-mode view
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4300423&req=5

Fig3: Measurements of diameter-change waveform and blood velocity. Left Long axis view of the common carotid artery and ultrasound beams. By setting the tracking positions displayed as small pink bars on the echo tracking beam (line A) to arterial walls, echo tracking automatically starts. The blood flow velocity averaged along the Doppler beam (line B) crossing the artery was measured using range-gated color Doppler signals. Right The diameter-change waveform, which is calculated by subtracting the distance to the near wall from that to the far wall, is displayed on the M-mode view. The blood flow velocity waveform is also displayed on the M-mode view
Mentions: According to Eq. 4, the maximum value of carotid arterial WD during a cardiac cycle (WD1) correlates with the maximum value of WI (W1). Therefore, WD1 correlates with peak dP/dt as W1 does (Fig. 1). WD is obtained by measuring U and D without measuring upper arm pressure (Fig. 3), which is easier to perform during exercise. The details of the method of measurements were described elsewhere [11].Fig. 2

Bottom Line: We first confirmed that HR increased linearly with an increase in work load in each subject (r (2) = 0.95 ± 0.04).The slope of the WD1-HR relation ranged 0.30-2.20 [m/s(3) (beat/min)].These data should show the potential usefulness of the FFR in the context of cardiac rehabilitation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Health Care Sciences, Himeji Dokkyo University, 7-2-1 Kamiohno, Himeji, Hyogo 670-8524 Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background and purpose: Estimation of the contractility of the left ventricle during exercise is important in drawing up a protocol of cardiac rehabilitation. It has been demonstrated that color Doppler- and echo tracking-derived carotid arterial wave intensity is a sensitive index of global left ventricular (LV) contractility. We assessed the feasibility of measuring carotid arterial wave intensity and determining force-frequency (contractility-heart rate) relations (FFRs) during exercise totally noninvasively.

Methods: We measured carotid arterial wave intensity with a combined color Doppler and echo tracking system in 25 healthy young male volunteers (age 20.8 ± 1.2 years) at rest and during exercise. FFRs were constructed by plotting the maximum value of wave intensity (WD1) against heart rate (HR).

Results: We first confirmed that HR increased linearly with an increase in work load in each subject (r (2) = 0.95 ± 0.04). WD1 increased linearly with an increase in HR. The goodness-of-fit of the regression line of WD1 on HR in each subject was very high (r (2) = 0.48-0.94, p < 0.0001, respectively). The slope of the WD1-HR relation ranged 0.30-2.20 [m/s(3) (beat/min)].

Conclusions: Global LV FFRs can be generated in healthy young volunteers with an entirely noninvasive combination of exercise and wave intensity. These data should show the potential usefulness of the FFR in the context of cardiac rehabilitation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus