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Participatory evaluation of chicken health and production constraints in Ethiopia.

Sambo E, Bettridge J, Dessie T, Amare A, Habte T, Wigley P, Christley RM - Prev. Vet. Med. (2014)

Bottom Line: Several programmes, in Ethiopia and elsewhere, have attempted to improve chicken production as a means to reduce poverty.Many of the challenges faced by both groups were associated with difficulty accessing agricultural and veterinary inputs and expertise.Provision needs to be made to allow access to inputs for a wide range of business models, particularly for those, such as women, who have limited access to the capital to allow them to make the jump from backyard to semi-intensive producer, and require support to slowly build up a flock into a profitable venture.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Institute of Infection and Global Health, University of Liverpool, Leahurst Campus, CH64 7TE, United Kingdom.

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Examples of chicken housing on semi-intensive holdings in and around Debre Zeit, Ethiopia. Materials used in construction made cleaning and disinfection impractical. Footbaths were only used on 2 of the 30 semi-intensive production premises (pictures E and F) and in both cases were unlikely to be effective.
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fig0010: Examples of chicken housing on semi-intensive holdings in and around Debre Zeit, Ethiopia. Materials used in construction made cleaning and disinfection impractical. Footbaths were only used on 2 of the 30 semi-intensive production premises (pictures E and F) and in both cases were unlikely to be effective.

Mentions: Biosecurity measures on most of the farms visited were lacking or likely to be ineffective. Reasons given for the relative lack of biosecurity included both practical concerns (such as the high cost of disinfectants) and beliefs about disease (such as the perception that biosecurity was only important when chicks were young and more vulnerable to infection). Cleaning of chicken houses usually included manual removal of manure and bedding, which was subsequently used (or sold) as fertiliser. Additional cleaning and disinfection was uncommon and only 2 of the 30 semi-intensive farms visited had a footbath; however these footbaths were unlikely to be effective on the day observed as the solution in one was mostly water and the other contained high levels of organic material (Fig. 2). Even when cleaning and disinfection of houses was reported, the materials used to build the poultry houses (wood, mud and cow dung) made it difficult or impossible for adequate cleaning. Although efforts were sometimes made to exclude rodents and wild birds (such as by using wire mesh on windows), even when present these were observed to be inadequate to prevent access by these animals.


Participatory evaluation of chicken health and production constraints in Ethiopia.

Sambo E, Bettridge J, Dessie T, Amare A, Habte T, Wigley P, Christley RM - Prev. Vet. Med. (2014)

Examples of chicken housing on semi-intensive holdings in and around Debre Zeit, Ethiopia. Materials used in construction made cleaning and disinfection impractical. Footbaths were only used on 2 of the 30 semi-intensive production premises (pictures E and F) and in both cases were unlikely to be effective.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4300415&req=5

fig0010: Examples of chicken housing on semi-intensive holdings in and around Debre Zeit, Ethiopia. Materials used in construction made cleaning and disinfection impractical. Footbaths were only used on 2 of the 30 semi-intensive production premises (pictures E and F) and in both cases were unlikely to be effective.
Mentions: Biosecurity measures on most of the farms visited were lacking or likely to be ineffective. Reasons given for the relative lack of biosecurity included both practical concerns (such as the high cost of disinfectants) and beliefs about disease (such as the perception that biosecurity was only important when chicks were young and more vulnerable to infection). Cleaning of chicken houses usually included manual removal of manure and bedding, which was subsequently used (or sold) as fertiliser. Additional cleaning and disinfection was uncommon and only 2 of the 30 semi-intensive farms visited had a footbath; however these footbaths were unlikely to be effective on the day observed as the solution in one was mostly water and the other contained high levels of organic material (Fig. 2). Even when cleaning and disinfection of houses was reported, the materials used to build the poultry houses (wood, mud and cow dung) made it difficult or impossible for adequate cleaning. Although efforts were sometimes made to exclude rodents and wild birds (such as by using wire mesh on windows), even when present these were observed to be inadequate to prevent access by these animals.

Bottom Line: Several programmes, in Ethiopia and elsewhere, have attempted to improve chicken production as a means to reduce poverty.Many of the challenges faced by both groups were associated with difficulty accessing agricultural and veterinary inputs and expertise.Provision needs to be made to allow access to inputs for a wide range of business models, particularly for those, such as women, who have limited access to the capital to allow them to make the jump from backyard to semi-intensive producer, and require support to slowly build up a flock into a profitable venture.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Institute of Infection and Global Health, University of Liverpool, Leahurst Campus, CH64 7TE, United Kingdom.

Show MeSH